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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, November 18, 1932, COUNTY EDITION, Image 1

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
cVERY ufl member
a reader of the
PRODUCERS news
COUNTY
EDITION
Weekly. /
Volume XV. Number 34
__ OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE _
PLENTYWOOD, SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1932
Entered as second Class Matter. October IS. 1912, at the Fo«t
office at Plentywood, Montana, Under the Act of March 3. 1819
Forward to the
farmers national
relief conference
WASHINGTON, D.C.-DEC.M0
iatcom county, wash.
ENDORSES DEMANDS
(BY' HAROLD BROCKWAY)
Suma-s Wash., Nov. 5.— During
week farmers in What
county, Wash., have been
holding many meetings and dis
the past
tern
cussing the plans for the Farmers
National Relief Ccnfernece.
AIDED NEW YORK STRIKERS,
WE SEND DELEGATE
The fanners of Tioga, Tomp
kins and Chemung counties in the
state of New York who were re
cently helping the Waverly and
Athens Silk Mill strikers, did not
let their relief organization go to
pieces after the silk strike was
over.
They have collected enough food
keep the hunger march well
to
NORTHWESTERN FARMERS
Ä1READY EN ROUTE
(BY WILLIS HIBNER)
Buhl, Idaho, Nov. 14.—Delega
tions of farmers are expected here
tomorrow, coming over the Old
Oregon Trail from Oregon, Wash
ington and western Idaho. Many
farmers have offered to be hosts
to the truckloads of farmers
their way to Washington. There
will be
cn
a farmers' meeting in
WASHINGTON STATE DELEGATION
ON WAY TO FREDERICK, S.D.
(BY ARCHIE YOUNG)
Mounr Vpmnrr WocV, vr
im w ,. ' '' v '. 'i
Washington state delegation |
to th e Farmers National ReUef
Conference started today. It will,
get into Montana about the 15th !
plans to reach Frederick, S. I
•, about November 20. 1
Keep a look out for our delega-1
DANIELS COUNTY, MONTANA
Scobey, Mont.—At the meeting ence was discussed and a oommit
o the Farmers Holiday Associa- tee of three was appointed to get
on held here November 1 the all available information as to the
farmers National Relief Confer
routes, plans and dates of journey.
HOW TO PROFIT
WITH POULTRY
Farmer* f.iwp« 1 asonn , d_. '
up ,, . __ ^
*^pert m Maple Valley
Washington
I
j
(BY WILLIAM FERGUSON)
? Kenton, Washington, Nov. 11.—
, Maple Valley district is one
°f mixed farming, or rather "was"
Until the majority of the farmers
Went broke.
The best thing that I have
heard lately is that the school dis
nt has hired an agricultural ex
Pert to teach the poultry raisers
hew to make large profits on poul
This is in line with Hoover's
'•ack-to-the-land" movement and
his program of "self help."
The farmers in this district are
Retting about the same relief as
«ty slaves,
jak ef about $2.50
family of 4, i
cents
which is at the
a week for a
other words. 2V*
Can you imagine
Jone needing to go to a doctor
a prescription for diet for
.. Purpose of reducing because
®y get fat on the enormous feed
^ 214 cents will buy.
UI course the farmers must pay
'«this so «4 P
in return.
^«Unemployed Citizens League
I highly endorsed bv Hoover
7 0s «velt, Tromas Coin Harvey'
Erding to them i t is the real
J^hod of saving the people and
^ring about such a ^sperous
fon<iition as cou ld scarcely be
lrrif *i?irH(i
in
a meal.
the
'^unemployed army is taking
, place of the unemployed, in
r^, of 8 °me getting $4.40 a day,
uces us to conditions where
tj** accept $2.60 a week in
rations, thus increasing the
unemployed and bringing
level or lower than
^ Chine«« coolie.
Here in Sumas at a meeting
held at Liberty Hall October 27,
the farmers endorsed the demands
for the Conference,
pected that delegates will repre
It is
ex
sent the farmers of the county at
th e Conference.
supplied during the over night
stay in Binghampton, N. Y.
The farmers will cooperate with
the Binghampton Unemployed
Council in feeding and caring for,
the hunger marchers, in addition
to electing their own delegates to
the Farm Relief Conference and
caring for the fraternal delegates
of the farmers from western New
York.
Buhl as soon as the delegates ar
rive.
The following day there will be
another meeting in Twin Palls,
where another load of delegates
from the northside will join the
march.
Buhl is on one of the six main
highways on which fleets of trucks
conveying farmers—like caravans
cf covered wagons— will move on
Washington.
tion. It is expected that it will)
g° through Helena, Great Falls,'term
Billings, Miles City, Dickinson,
Bismarck and Frederick. At Fred
-rick it will b e met by a delega
tion from South Dakota.
I Will write in a few days about
our state conference and plans for
organizing the farmers in this
state.
Chinese Peasants In
Fight on High Taxes
A mass revolt of Chinese peas
ants has broken out fifty miles
from Nanking, seat of Chiang Railing
Shek's nationalist government.
[Thousands of peasants marched,on
to Yangchow to protest the recent
increase of taxes, which was put
through 40 W for the civil wars
now raging in China. The upns
ing followed the arrest of fifty
peasants for not paying these new
taxes. Local authorities arrested
200 of the marchers, drove the
rest outside the city, and barri
caded themselves inside the city
walls. The city is now complète
ly surrounded by mobs of angry
peasants, while messengers hurry
through the countryside pounding
gongs and ringing bell«/ to «um- 1
mon peasants from more distant
places to join the revolt.
UNBEARABLE CONDITION
For centuries the Chinese peas- ;
ants have lived in great poverty. |
in the past few years» econo
mic conditions have been st^dûy |
reducing their standards of ^ g
even further, to unbeara y
levels. In addition to the burdens
taxes, rents and U P«ces o
their crops they have
i worst effects of the civ
Jiv,Uch h... swept Chin, in «eent
' year8 * Rlval Chuiese war lords
a * often backed by foreign gov
«»ment« or foreign business men,
ia y waSte their üelds » P"* extra
taxes on their lands and produce,
**d draft them into unwilling ser
vice in the armies. Even funds
collected for repairing river dikes
are taken for the armies, and the
In
ta ™ bl€
nsm *s of the Chinese peasants
^v« ««rated.
In central China, it was chiefly
a peasant revolt against these con
ditions which led to the setting
up of Soviet governments, which
1 now include close to one hundred
million people In their area.
FRAMED NEGRO
BOYS WILL GET
ANOTHER TRIAL
I
! Supreme Court Ruling
Scottsboro Case Result
of Mass Pressure
on
STILL IN DANGER
Boys Can Only Be Saved
by Intensified Mass
Struggle
Washington, D. C., Nov. 7.—On
the eve of the Presidential elec
tions, the U. S. Supreme Court,
in a decision handed down today,
granted a new trial for the Scotts
boro boys. The decision reverses
the death verdict of the Alabama
lynch courts against the nine in
nocent Negro boys who were
framed up on a "rape" charge in
Scottsboro, Ala., and originally
sentenced to die in the electric
chair on July 10, 1931.
This partial victory is a direct
result of the international cam
paign of protest organized and led
by the Communist party of the
U. S. and the International Labor
Defense. In practically every coun
try of the world mighty demon
strations of protest were held, and
millions of workers—Negro and
white— mobilized behind the cam
paign to force the freedom of the
Scottsboro defendants.
DOES NOT MEAN BOYS
ARE FREE
The decision of the U. S. Su
preme court means the Scottsboro
boys get a new trial—it does not
mean that they go free!
While the decision postpones the
execution in the face of over
whelming evidence of their inno
cence, the U. S. Supreme Court
turns the Scottsboro boys back to
the hands of the court which en
gineered the original frameup.
Meanwhile in Fort Wayne, Ala.,
Judge A. E. Hawkins, who im
posed the death penalty on the
Scottsboro boys, said that the new
trial will be set for the March
of the Circuit Court at
Scottsboro. He said that the trial
date would be set within the next
few weeks, and that h e would ask
for troops at the second trial, over
which he probably will preside,
"The presence of militia will be
more imperative than ever,' he
said.
ASK IMMEDIATE LYNCHING
A dissenting opinion was
dered by Judge J. C. McReynolds
and Pierce Butler, two judges who
upheld the contention of th e Ala
bama authorities that the judicial
(Continued on Pa«» Two)
ren
Manchuria, the so-called rebels
I and 'bandits' tvho have been fight
the Japanese, are in reality
I mostly peasants who are carrying
a heroic fight against foreign
| oppression,
TRY HINDER UFL
FARMERS MEET
Hobart and Issaquah Locals
Asked to Contribute
Short Articles
(BY WILLIAM FERGUSON)
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 12.—Some
of the members of the United
Farmers League came along with
held a meeting at the
me ^ wg _
Tanner sch<)ol on Nov. 9.
^
K « success We
^ diff . cuJty ^ getting th e use
school even after we had
permission * u£ * it,
- it was especially antago
board members had
d«»rid<»d that it was to be a Com
decided ttatit to ^ ^
S*d JTa husky bunch of men
P "* edl ™
to fight us.
FIGHT FOR NOT AGAINST
WORKERS
I assured them we had not come
to fight, especially against the
that the United
workers and
Farmer» League was a
farmers to fight for their own de
mands.
I have received » great deal of
help from the members who be
long to the Hobart, Wash., unit of
the U. F. L. These members are
particularly active and have con
tribu ted to the UFL in everX_gfM
union of
No Improvement for
Farm Masses Admits
.
State»-are promised that there is
a "fair prospect" that in another
!
year, during the 1933-1934 season.
the market conditions for their
crops may be better. This "pros-1
pact" that the Department of Ag
riculturc sees, means not that
will be any improvement, but that
the Department of Agriculture
mits that there will be km im -
provement during the next year at
INCOMES GO DOWN
According to the estimate of the
Department of Agriculture itself,
which is not noted for accuracy,
when advising the farmers, gross
income from farm production dur
ing 1932 will be less than $5,000,
000,000 as compared with $ 11 , 900 ,-,
000,000 in 1929, $9,300,000,000 in)
1930 and $6,900,000,000 in 1931.
How much less than $5,000,000,
000 the department failed to state.
The basis of hope for even a
year from now is that there has
already been an improvement,
from July to October, in the basic
conditions of the country, accord
ing to the Hoover agriculture de
partment. This is nothing but a
continuation of the lies circulated
by Hoover during the campaign to
win the election.
NO CHANGE IN DEMAND
The real "unfavorable factors"
which are mentioned in the report
of the Department of Agriculture
will more than offset the imagi
nary "favorable factors" which
were invented by Hoover.
The Hoover Government is
forced to admit that "the domes
tic demand for farm products in
general has increased ONLY
SLIGHTLY from the low level
reached so far !n this depres
ison, and white NO MARKET
CHANGES FROM THIS LEVEL
ARE LIKELY DURING THE
NEXT FEW MONTHS, there is
a fair prospect that domestic de
mand during the 1933-1934 sea
Liberty ,, Leaders Aided Fusion
Economy Ticket to Win Offices
u
k
Straight Communist Vote of 575 Is Core of Development
of Further Struggles In Sheridan County, Others
Thru With Old Capitalist Parties
Renegade Larson Diverted Bitterness of Hundreds of
Farmers Against Present Regime Into Support of
Liberty Party, to Put Polk Back In Courthouse
(BY CHAS. E. TAYLOR)
The Economy League fusion can-|
didates on the republican ticket in
Sheridan county were ail elected
Tuesday by a substantial pluralities
'The victory of the
ROOSEVELT _ -
CARRIES COUBTT
Nationally Roosevelt «wept U**
county. receiving a rer'--keh "
The Roosevelt democrat
Txnocihle a „d if it were nof for
possible and H « were not■ "> r
members like these it would be
hard for an organizer to do the
work.
and majorities,
fusion ticket, bo complete, was ac
complished by the liberty party in
splitting the vote in opposition to
the fusion ticket as was designed
by those responsible for the filing
of that ticket.
plurality.
It would be fine if they could be
.. «... VnGii
gotten into the habit °I contrinui
ine shoit stories to the Producers
f im a In this
News, from time to time, in ims
particular phase of the work the
i Mon „.i, nn jf „«„id Ho a lot of
Issaquah unit could do a lot oi
good and I would like to near
from Ruch members as could write
irom suen m rnoer«
WRITE IN!
even a little hit.
nr l.ij „«„fprpnce in Se
We held our conf
attle on Nov. 10 and I wa« one
- thrtcp elen+pd ns a delegate to
of those elected as a deieg O
the Washington Conference. 1
will keen vou nested all along the
W11 * ^ vT j ., . - •_
route if I can find anytmng Of in
h»rA«sf to write about.
and how 1« the work Of the
_ __
United Farmer« League pro
gressing?
__ » „u K1.M we don't
Just Who M to Diaiwe we •
know but we think that some
l w . w -b Anl d l, ave written to us
body MOUW MW wniwn w u»
about the Seattle OMltereuce
—.«.A Hm« am and more ex
some time ago. a U
_ _
about «ometWng to write Do
_ WaTI _ Rasmus
yon remember nan» I^ssmiw
•en*« letter« on the Himger
Hens found
March loot yearr /v*
something to write aoouf every
» w ,_J thev were real fine pie
day and '"*T w *" ^ *
hires of the March that he #ae*
Editor's Notes How about it
Hobart and Is«aquahT We would
all like to hear from you. What
the conditi cris of the fartn
are
era
tenelvdv.
We think that delegate
who possibly can, «hould tell w
a |j about the trip to Waahing
You don't have to worry
ton.
ment over present conditions.
[ ,
! Tre reasons for improvement in
1933-34 are; more "confidence"
yy
. . .
/ba" previously there is a
K 1 «*" "need for goods and more
hcrej«!»* somewhat. - These
ar . e n ° more than so much hypo
ad-'«™? 1 ^ a hrniger admln.strahon
that has tried its best to put the
*>« of the crisis on the
. toiling masses.
i FOREIGN MARKET CUT
I, Not only has the domestic mar
ket be ™ ™rtmled but the foreign
mar Kets which usually take a
lar S e Proportion of the domestic}
cas J 1 .^P a !^ so becoming more
restricted. The: Department of Ag-.
«culture admits this also.
< Trade wier« and restriction
affecting American »exports have
been intensified, however, and
no substantial improvement in.
the foreigia demand for most
Américain agricultural products
appear likely during the remain
der D f th e 1932-33 year."
The prospect seen by the Hoover
Department that "improvement
bë n "f only '"modCTa
means that the farmers face fn
1933, despite changes in admini
tration, a future which is not
going to be one whit better thanj
the present, and may be as much
worse than the present than 1932
has been Worse than 1931.
ON TO WASHINGTON
This is the future that faces
farm masses of the country.
order to get relief for themselves
and their families in the face
these conditions the delegates
the impoverished farmers thruout
the country will meet in Washing
\on, D. C., Dec. 7-10 to formulate
their demands to be presented
Congress and also to organize
struggle for these demands thru
out the country.
vote was 1450 against 739 for Hoo
ver republican, against 677 for Fos
ter Communist, and against 372 for
1 t j, e liberty candidate, whoever he is
which Is not certain—however most
of the voters thought they were vot
ing for W. H. (Coin) Harvey, the
84 year old sage of Monte Ne, Ark.,
and against 109 for Norman Thom
as, socialist. y
The vote for the old capitalist
party candidates combined was .2197
as against 1058, the combined anti
old capitalist party candidates. How
ever, many of the voters that went
for Roosevelt cannot actually be
classified a»s democratic or capital
; ist votes; they were rather antl
Hoover votes. For there were an
average of 250 more votes cast for
Rodney Salisbury Tpr governor and
i the rest of the Communist State
candidates than there were for Fos
ter. The vote cast for Erickson,
democratic candidate for governor,
was 500 less than the vote cast for
Roosevelt, and Roy Ayres, democrat
candidate for cdhgress and the rest
of the democratic state ticket, was
just as much 1038 than that cast forl
] the New York governor. Looking
over the Liberty returns for presi
d(>nt rt a PP ears tha t over 120 more
votes were cast on the average for
the state ticket than for the liberty»)
national electery. The 250 Commun
lgt voteg and the 126 llberty votea
totaling 870 went to Roosevelt.
These votes were not eo much for
against
ver—Indicating that these voters
were afraid that Hoover might win
and they did not want to take a
chance on it. Turn'ng to the re
Publican rV 1 it seems that about
lg0 Repub i lcan capitalist voters
scratched their ballot against cap
It allst Hoover for capitalist demo
crat Roosevelt and then voted the
rest of the rcpubMcan Straight.
(These votes were capitalist votes In-;
dicatlng a choice between capitalist
Taking all things together it would
seem that about half of the voters
of Sheridan county are prepared to
vote against the old capitalist bl
party machine now. There were
1068 votes against the old capitalist
party candidates. Add to these the
870 whQ voted for Roosevelt to be
aure of beating Hoover who really
expect nothing of Roosevelt but are
. t gore at Hoover an d want him
out of the president's chair, and
(there are 1428 anti old capitalist
party votes to '819 old capitalist
.'party votes, or «4819 to 1428 who
still believe in capitalism and that
capitalism can find a way out of
the present crlste. There were 3238
cast for president In the county.
The 1068 votes cast for the ml
norlty candidates, broadly speaking,
; indicate that there are that many
! voters In Sheridan county who are
thru wJth bot h old capitalist par
t*es and understand that there 9s
no different between a democrat
and republican candidates: that
whether Hoover or Roosevelt was
elected meant nothing to them
to the working class, or anything
either to the capitalist c'ass Five
I .tk.. ..«» ...
candidates.
HALF OT VOTE»»
AGAINST CAPITALISM
MASS PROTESTS OF HUNDREDS
OF FARMERS LED BY U. F. L
PREVENT TWO FORCED SALES
Swedish Socialist Government
Attempts to Slash Wages
of Agricultural Workers
Prior to the recent elections the social democracy in
Sweden used the threatened wage cuts for agricultural
-l—tion nronaaanda and declared the bast
workers as election propaganda and declared the bast
wa y tight the cuts was to vote for social democratic
candidates. Since then a social democratic government
has been formed. It appointed a 'Mediation Committee'
■ , n . , . ,,
( the conflict Bnd this committee now proposes 3Ti a.11
i round wage cut of 20 per cent. A ballot of the agricul
composed exclusively of bourgeois gentlemen to settle
tural workers has rejected this proposal with a majority
1 of 83 per cent. At the next election it will be more diffi
; to persuade the agricultural workers that a vote for
the social democracy is a vote in favor of their own in
terests.
|
1
i
IOWA FARMERS TO
FIGHT EVICTIONS
BY MASS ACTION
:
Spencer, Iowa.—Failing to ob
In tain official action in their re
the
quest for delay in the delinquent
of tax sale, 100 Clay county farmers
of 1 Wednesday, Nov. 2, met at the
court house here and voted to pre
vent, by force if necessary, any
bids or attempts to buy tax cer
to tificates when offered for sale by
the County Treasurer C. C. Bender,
December 5. The group is known
as the United Farmers
to the minority parties and espec
ially to the Communist party still
thought there was a choice between
the capitalist candidates, or anyway
they didn't want any more of Hoo
ver. and without a doubt many of
these voters succumbing to the
demagogy of Roosevelt and the
democratic party had a hope that
maybe Roosevelt can bring back
prosperity. Y'hese are going to t»e
sadly disappointed as are going to
be the mass of the democratic vot
ers who showed by their votes that
they believe that prosperity is just
around the corner which while re
fusing to come* around for Hoover
will come around for Roosevelt.
When these workers and farmers
learn once and for all times that
there is no prosperity around the
corner under capitalism, that pros
perity for them will come only with
the abolltioi> of the capitalist sys
tem, will corné marching around the
corner to the tune of the Interna
tional and under the folds of tne
red flag, they will then vote Com
munist. But as long as they be
lieve that prosperity is coming back
and that they are going to pay their
taxes, pay their intererst and re
deem their farms and homes and
get their old Jobs back again with
good wages, they are going to vote
for one or the other of the old cap
italist party candidates—the best
man.
COMMUNIST ASS THBV
WITH CAPITALISM
The vote cast for Foster and Ford
the 577, means that there arô just
that many basic Communists Tn
Sheridan county. This vote in it
se if is a splendid victory for the
l Communists. If means much more
than most people realise. And then
there are the 600 more almost Corn
munist who are stiu contused and
• c ii ng to the lesser evil illusion, and
bes £ es thi8i there are the 50U mort
w tio have separated themselves from
j the capitalist parties for keeps who
yet
communist proposals. All of theae
u e convinced ot the truth uiu
soundness of the Communist con
tentions before anotner year rolls
aruu nd, as they awaken to the re
auction that Rooeevelt will not and
cannot bring back prosperity, and
the hard truth comes home that
prosperity is not lurking just about
the corner and as they are con
v j nce< j by experience and fact .
the facts of foreclosures and evic
tions and further wage cuts and in
creased unemployment, by the facts
of hunger ana starvation—they will
come to understand clearly that
there is oniy one way out of the
crisis and that way is the overthrow
of the capitalist system and the sub
stltution of the Communist system
in its place which system will pro
! vide jobs and food for every worker;
! they will come to understand that
capitalism, the cause of their star
1 vatlon and misery, can only be over
thrown by organisation and militant
, struggle: and they will further come
to undenstand that the socialist and
Hbertyite farmer and worker must
organize with the Communist farm
ers Into the Communist party and
struggle mllltantly with that party,
the only party of and with a pro
gram for the Impoverished voters,
together with
still voting old capitalist tickets foi
capitalism, when They come to un
deiwtand will do that very thin*.
Andlt will occur before the next
election campaign.
_
FRESXDERT
,2* î hc * , B °i vote
or,^ 8ld U lt at a11 - . Th,s . !> d " e to
/ ac » that the voters do not un
I der *tand how to vote—they look for
1 irnnhitiMA nn P,»
by
hundreds who are
PLAN OF SLASH
IN PRODUCTION
Federal Farm Board Tells
Farmers Production Must
Be Decreased
The Federal Farm Board has
discovered that "selling no longer
can be considered the sole func
tion of agricultural cooperative
marketing associations." In a
bulletin which the Farm Beard
issued on November 8, it at
tempts to keep the farmers of the
country looking to "co-operation"
a way out of the crisis—even
tbo it no longer dares to promise
them higher prices as a result of J
these marketing activities.
CURTAILMENT OF
PRODUCTION
The main aim of the Farm !
Board is now "curtailment of pro
duction." The program which the
Farm Board offers the toilers of
the country is not relief for the
unemployed and for the farmers (
so that they can buy the agricul
tural products of the country, but
reduction of production while mil
lions starve and go ragged.
The bulletin of the Federal Farm
Board reads in part as follows:
"It should be emphasized that
«elling no longer can be consid
ered the sole function of a co
operative association A coop
erative should also enable farm
ers to improve and standardise
production and quality of its
products and encourage the most
profitable adjustment of produc
tion in relation ot other farm
enterprise». It is not economic
ally sound to dncommge, either
directly or indirectly the produc
tion of dairy products beyond
the point of maximum returns.
Rather, it is the function of co
operative associations to en
courage curtailment of produc
tion, if there is "Overproduction,
to assist their members to re
A»ce costs of production, to im
prove the quality of the pro
ducts, a|nd to offer economically
and efficient marketing srevlce.
Cooperative associations are of
the greatest value to their mem
bers when they are able to per
form these services success
fully."
has
has
years
been telling the farmers that co
operative marketing was the way
out because by this means they
could get better prices for their
products. Now that the farmers
are learning from their own ex
perience that "co-operation"
been part of th© robbery system
of the capitalist class, the Farm
Board brings to the fore again the
horrible program of plowing un
der every third row that the Hoo
ver administration advised at the
beginning of the crisis.
HOOVER CAMOUFLAGE
"Improvement and standardiza
tion of production" and "econo
mical and efficient marketing ser
vice" are included by the Farm
Board in Its bulletin only in order
to camouflage the decay of the
capitalist system which has as its
only solution for the crisis in
creased misery for the toiling
, .
Against auch a program tt'
workers and fanners mnrt nnite
for relief from the eapitallat ' ««
and Its gojerament. Only united
worker and farmer atruggle for
ÂÂîarjs
llnni nf InÜFr*
BANKS RETREAT
800 Meet at Chili, 1500
Protest at Granton,
Wisconsin
FALSE FHA CLAIMS
Bank Attorney Tries Soft
Soap, But Fanners Call
HU Bluff
Owen, Wis,, Nov. 7.—A mass of
800 farmers stopped a foreclosure
sale Saturday, Nov. 5, on the farm
of John Nobel, at Chili, Wis.
Two days later a mass of 1600
stopped a foreclosure sale on the
farm of Fred Jacobi, Granton.
A meeting was called by a rep
resentative of the United Farmer«
League Nov. 2 at the Elmwood
school. At this meeting three ac
tion committees were formed,
from the townships of Green
Grove, Beaver and Longwood,
GIVE F. H. A. POINTERS
Local F. H. A. leaders came to
this meeting, to find out just what
procedure to go through in the
stopping of foreclosure sales, and
evictions. They also informed
those present of the sale that was
to take place on the Nobel farm,
and looked to the U. F. L. to give
them some information.
Walter Harju addressed this U.
F. L. meeting and discussed for
about an hour problems confront
»I
ing the farmers. He also pointed I
out to the FHA leaders the U. P.
L. attitude towards the strike
movement. Nine farmers joined
the UFL at this meeting.
I
GO TO STOP SALE
The newly appointed action com
rnittees were drafted into action
immediately to get a crowd to
gether to stop the sale of Nobel's
property, which was to be sold to
satisfy a chattel mortgage held by
the State bank of Chili, now
closed for liquidation,
They spread the news that the
farmers were going to stop the
sale. A truck was chartered and
took the militant UFL action com
rnittees to the sale two hours be
fore the sale was scheduled to take
place.
!
i!
BANKER REFUSES
MORATORIUM
1
After the crowd gathered they
appointed a committee that would
go and talk to the banker, who
was sitting in a car with the
clerk and auctioneer, to demand
mora
him that he declare a
torium on the mortgage of No
hel's property. He refused to do
so, saying that he Svould sell the
property to satisfy his
creditors.
<<
poor
Immediately someone
in the crowd, that had gathered
around the auto of the banker's, • l ,
said "what about the poor farm
ers?" which won a burst of ap
plause.
i
I
The father of John Nobel said
he would pay his son's mortgage
if the defunct bank of Chili would
give him his money that he had
in the bank. The banker said he
couldn't do that.
FARMERS OUST BANKER
The farmers gave the banker to
understand that if he went ahead
with the sale they would not bid
on a single article The banker
then called the sale off, and got
out of the yard as fast as he
could.
meeting on this farm, which was
addressed by Walter Harju, who
called upon the farmers to pre
iij
The farmers then held a mass
I
vent all future sales.
. They decided at this meeting
that they would all go to Neills
ville, the county seat, the follow
ing Monday morning, to protest
against foreclosures «id evictions.
That night the sheriff came
out and got two of the cotos from
the Nobel farm.
OO TO COURTHOUSE
Monday morning found hun
dreds of farmers on their way to *
the county seat. Three truck»
from th, yiefait, of Owen and
U, u „ith UFL and FHA signs
were loaded to capacity with •
hnm>n that had set eut to
voke ^ o( , heri(t
- 4 to *- —*
officials

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