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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, November 25, 1932, COUNTY EDITION, Image 2

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
Published weekly at Plentywood, Montana, bjr
The Peoples Publishing Go
y, Inc.
Official Organ of the
UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
Official paper of the City of Plentywood, Montana
Subscription Rates: National Edition—In the United States;
per year, $2.09; six months, $1.00; three months, 50 cents.
Foreign per year $2.50; six months $1.26; three months 66 cents.
County Edition—In the United States: year $3.00; six months
$ï.60; four months $1.00. County Edition to foreign countries,
year $3.50; six months $1.76; four months $1.26.
Advertising Rates furnished upon application.
ERIK BERT, Editor
HANS RASMUSSEN, Business Manager
Friday, November 25, 1932
The latest expressions of the bankers' program have
come from Louis Clarke, president of the Nebraska Mort
gage Bankers Association and O. M. Corwin, of the Cor
win Company of Minneapolis. Clarke's statement was
to the press while Corwin's was made at the North Da
kota Landowners Conference meeting in Fargo. North
_ . . . ,
Dakota, this past week.
BANKER'S 'LENIENCY' MEANS
INTENSIFIED EXPLOITATION
If farmers anywhere thruout the country needed to
be convinced of the necessity for the Farmers National
Relief Conference the recent statements of bankers as to
their future program would carry conviction.
The bankers have made these statements with a
view to hindering the organization of the farmers to
struggle for their own interests. Therefore the slogan
of the bankers is "leniency." But while they talk of
leniency'' they actually plan for foreclosures and evic
tions.
4 «
* *
Here are the statements of "leniency.
No foreclosures are being started by legitimate in
stitutions unless the farmer's case is absolutely hopeless,'
11 11 x .1 .
Clarke said. 1 he average banker, when he sees there is
a chance, is working with the farmer.
« «
»t
Mortgage companies are not pursuing a policy of
ruthless foreclosure,'' said Corwin. "Perhaps that might
not have been said of conditions 10 years ago. But it
certainly is not true today that mortgage holders are forc
ing people off the land except as a last resort, and where
the farmer says he is through, or where he is so heavily
involved that he cannot possibly work out.
There are cases, of course, where mistakes eure
made where some clerk in a loaning agency may take an
arbitrary attitude and bring about a condition of misun
derstanding that may end in needless foreclosure, but
those as isolated instances.
These are the WORDS about "leniency,
are the facts?

* »
♦ *
* *
What
C. F. Mudgett, manager of the Bank of North Da
kota, state-owned agency for exploiting the farmers,
speaking at the Land Owners Conference, agreed with
Corwin that "land is not foreclosed except when it is
found that there is no other resource.
The Bank of North Dakota itself has, according to
the statement of Mudgett himself, at the conference fore
closed on 387,000 acres of farm land. This is the result
of the program of "leniency" of the bankers.
This program falls into two parts—one of which
follows directly on the other. The first part is "leniency.
**The average banker, when he sees there is a chance, is
working with the farmer," says Clarke. Chance of
what? Why is the banker working with the farmer or
how is he working the farmer?
As long as the bankers can squeeze more out of the
farmer who is on the land than they can expect to get
from a new buyer or from a new tenant they are 'lenient'
they allow the farmer to remain on the land and be ex
ploited.
» »
»»
The second part of the program is brought into
, when the farmer's case is absolutely hopeless," accord
ing to Clarke, and "as a last resort ... or where he is so
heavily involved that he cannot possible work out,
( cording to Corwin.
I ! the most impoverished farmers, those who have been
I bled to the bone by the capitalist class.
I These two steps are part of the same program,
I While there is yet a possibility of exploiting the farmer
! who is on the land the bankers let him stay. When, how
ever, thru their ruthless plundering, he has been driven
j to a point where there is nought left but the farm, stock
i and machinery, then they demand that also as their trib
ute.
use
• •
ao
44
Who are these fanners? These are
I
This is the program of the bankers and of the other
j great mortgage holders. What must be the program of
/the impoverished farmers? This program will be worked
i out at the Farmers National Relief Conference in Wash
ington, Dec. 7-10.
This program is being carried out already by im
poverished farmers thruout the northwest as this issue of
■ the Producers News indicates. The program is one of
:i|nws8 resistance to the onslaught of the robber capitalists.
.The United Farmers League has continuously advocated
i such actions by the impoverished farmers and now many
bf the most determined struggles against evictions and
rforeclosures are taking place under the leadership of the
U. F. L.
i
I
t
.i
Why this kind of a program rather than such "relief
wograms as are proposed by all manner of
» *
• 4
progressive"
Doings of the
Advance Guard
At this time farmers from far away states are mov
ing towards Washington and those closer by are getting
ready. Telegrams have been sent to all governors telling
them to try and get the farmers to stay at home. They
don't want the farmers in Washington. They want them
to stay at home and slop the hogs, and let it go at that;
On the seventh day of December one year ago I was among the
1675 National Hunger Marchers standing before the capitol singing the
"Internationale" with guns of all descriptions pointing at us, with
countless thousands of spectators looking on. Later it was the ex
soldiers, now it is the farmers, and in Washington they are getting
nervous, they don't want these demonstrations brought right home to
them, they want the farmers to stay at home.
In Washington they just hate to see the farmers come, and that
is one good reason why farmers should go there by the thousand and
present their demands to the people who are responsible for the mis
erable conditions. What will count more than the demonstration in
Washington are the meetings held going and coming all over the coun
try. There they will have a chance to organize themselves into some
thing worth while, something that will protect our homes from fore
closure and sheriff sales. And they will have a chance to tell about
the Producers News and get more subscriptions for a real farmers
paper. Don't forget to take a bundle along.
DOINGS OF LAST WEEK
Joseph Vlach, Terry ville, L. I.,
N. Y., sends in a one year sub
scription.
Willis Hibner and Geo. Keith, of
Buhl, Idaho, are here again wdth
six new subscribers.
Perry Morris, Twin Falls, Idaho
sends us two subs.
Carl Jokela, Clastskanie, Oreg.,
one sub.
James Allen, Minot, N. D., pays
for six sub cards sold and also
pays for a bundle.
Victor Heino, Roberts, Mont.,
subscribes.
Oscar Kiviaho, Clatskanie, Oreg
subscribes.
Perry Morris, Hansen, Idaho,
sends us two subs.
se ^ d Q J!* Renton ' Wasb "
HOOVER ^rowîf IT
Wm Ferguson, Seattle, Wash.,
sends in three more subs and
p^s for a bundle^ William
says he is going to Washington,
D. C., for the big farmers dem
onstration.
John Lopez, Vacaville, Calif.,
writes and says they expect to
^ Ram ? e the U. F. L. and order
i 15 copies to be sent each week.
I J. D. Blodgett, McCabe, Mont.,
I sends us one sub,
Roy Miller, Frederick, S. Dak.,
sends one sub.
FARMERS LIKE IT REAL
WELL
Rarold Brockway, Sumas, Wash,
writes: "I am sending 85 cents in
this letter for more copies of the
FARMERS RELIEF CONFERENCE
(Continued from Front Pag*)
DELEGATES SENT TO SEATTLE
FARM RELIEF CONFERENCE
(BY HAROLD BROCKWAY)
Sumas, Wash., Nov. 17.—Two of
us have started organizing a Com
mittee of Action in Whatcom
county.
organized now and hope to get
the rest of the county organized
before long. It is pretty hard to
get around since we are all broke.
We had a mass meeting at the
high school on Monday, Nov. 7 to
elect delegates to the state
ference at Seattle on Nov. 10
About 125 farmers were present
an"d it was a real meeting,
were elected, one of whom will
probably go to the National Con
We have one township
con
Five
DELEGATE FROM SOUTHERN
MONTANA IS ELECTED
Roberts, Mont., Nov. 15.—One
delegate was elected at the Rob
erts National Farm Relief Confer
ence which was held here on Nov,
14, to attend the Washington Con
ference.
Thirty farmers were present at
the meeting. The conference bul
letin Was read and explained by
the chairman, Arne O. Kainu, and
discussion was opened to all those
present.
The following demands
adopted ;
1. We demand a moratorium on
interest and mortgages for
farmers.
2 . We demand that there be
evictions.
3. We demand higher prices.
are lighting the middle man
and the monied interests who
with the consent and approval
of the govern meint control the
national marketing machinery.
We are resolved that increased
were
poor
no
politicians and farm "leaders"? Because such a program
[which unites all of the impoverished farmers for strug
gle is the only one which will win relief for the farmers
from the brutal attacks of the capitalist class. Any other
program, no matter how plausible it may sound, is only
a means to keep the farmers enslaved to the capitalists
and the misery they breed, by keeping them from the
path of united mass action.
Forward to more determined and widespread
mass struggle against forced sales, evictions, and
foreclosures!
**/""*" Nahon a! Relief Con
ference, fte delegated representative of the impov
erished farmers of the United Slates.
--"
Producers News, it sure is a won
derful paper and the farmers like
it real 'well, r
about ten copies
ought to be able to sell a hundred
a week before very long,
are organizing the counties into
committees of action and are
ing to send a delegate to Wash
ington, D. C.
DEMOCRATIC TIMES NOT
QUITE HERE YET
Frank Martlnchek, of Custer
Mich., "Enclosed find $1 for a
sub to be sent to me. Looks
like you don't know that we have
democratic times now, as you
stopped the paper and that is
*not what democracy stands for,
Frank write». Now Frank, we're
not stopping papers in order to
be mean, we would like to hand
tliem tout to everybody free of
charge if we only could afford
to do so, but we simply can wot
afford it. We have a heck of a
time keeping above water as it
ia, so it is hard for us to make
exceptions and be as democratic
as we would like to be.
G. V. Pearson, Ruthven, Iowa,
sends one more sub.
Farmers League, Twin Falls,
Idaho, sends money for 10.. copies
of the paper to be sent.
OREGON FARMERS
READY
Frank M. Owe, Salem, Oregon,
writes for sample copies. "I will
see what I can do getting sub
scriptions. I think we can do
something with the farmers in
this vicinity," he says.
Keep On sending
a week. We
They
go
/
ff
ference. We raised $5.91 at the
mass meeting on the 7th and the
«ext two days we went around U
the farmers and raised enough to
make a total of $20 which should
be enough to get one of our dele
gates to Washington, D, C.
Jake Komen was elected as tfie
delegate to the Washington Con
ference.
There are seven committees of
action organized now around Su
mas.
more dope on how to go on with
the work. Jake Komen and I
appointed as organizers in this
county.
Will you please send some
were

Success In Soviet Union
__ .
The Soviet Institution for Rareî
Elements has successful in obtain
ing considerable quantities of a
new element known as Vanadium
by the application of new methods.
Vanadium is a rare metal of great
value in the production of high
quality steel. Previously it was
produced almost; exdusivdy in the
United States where the secret of
its manufacture was jealously
g
prices to the farmers must
come, hot from higher prices to
city consumers and other work
ers , but from the profits of the
middlemen and monied Interests.
K, E. Weidman was elected to
go as our delegate to Washington
and lists have been put into circu
lation to collect the
funds to send him.
necessary
New Technical-Scientific
DETROIT JOBLESS JEER HOOVER
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Hundreds of jobless work
of Detroit demonstrated
against Hoover as he ar
rived in the station on his
pre-election tour.
ers
I
Sr&.i6a>4Ej|
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DELEGATES FROM WEST COAST
START FOR WASHINGTON, D.Cj
(Continued from Front Png.)
holding British subject and presi
dent, Hoover.
UNEMPLOYED LIVE IN TIN
SHACKS
Billings' Hooverville is construct
ed on the same general plans as
in all other cities of this land of
the free—old tin, pounded flat and
a bunch of refuse lumber makes
the city. It is not hidden. It
covers about 400 feet in the rear
of the depot and is on a garbage
dump.
All along the line of the march
we have been confronted with the
. . . j ... .. . .
iTLo ul.tZ, WIT'S
of evictions because of inability to
pay taxes, of a lack of organisa
tion and organizers. Whitehall
heeds organizers and we are told
that the farmers would welcome
an organizer at any time.
lÄSÄ
IZV/ "an^ha"^
«èn'to lM lld memhers a în < 'a g Thort
taon to 100 members m a short
GET A SUB
B. F. Thompson of Billings wel
comed us to his house, took a six
months subscription to the Pro
ducers News and gave each out
fit $1 for gas
No funds have reached the
STOP EVICTIONS
IN Mid COUNTY
(Continued from Front Page)
----i
visors. The Baraga county UFL
got busy and mobilized the farm
ers to demonstrate against the
eviction of Ellis and also to de
mami a stop toall foreclosures and
evncttoma and tlmttb e coun ty board
provide food and dething. The
farmers and their spokesman,
Frank Arvola, kept the supervis
in i S . e f S 1 ?7 1 * or tbree hours >
whlC j had t0 agree to
the demands of the farmers. The
farmers also demanded the remov
al of the county agricultural agent
who is at all times working again:it."
tne mterests of the poor farmers.
Ihis the board of supervisors did
not concede to. so the farmers de
fî^f tn f 0 hf a ^ lze a i Wide
fight for the removal of the coun
tyagont.
This demonstration and the
tones it won shows that the farm-j
ers can win only by mass action
noficiJf of 0 l t°hTn -Sf * lghting
League. The farmers also"
ence Which is being held in Wash
ington, D. Ç., in December.
Many farmers are joining the
UPL as »result of this demon
stration, which was the biggest
victory the Baratra countv farm
ers have gained this far. P60pIe
here know from Roosevelt's speech
.before election that they will get
110 more from him than from Hoo
I ver. Farmers want a char p-e but
n <>t from one brand of capitalist
politicians to another. Ihose who
! did vote ^ Roosevelt were fooled
i h 1 * 0 believing all kinds of "radical"
«Poches th.t dont moon any
, _
F ! 0Wl " g aye he demands
a ^ Und , . wbich 016 fa^-ers lallied
and which were . accep ed by the
Bowrd of Supervisors with cne or
two small changes:
1- Against foreclosure ,,f the
farm of Eriiest Ellis of Aura.
2. That the Board of Super
visors stop all foreclosures and
evictions of farmers from their
laud.
3. That the Board of Super
visors see to it that plenty of
warm clothing and good food
be distributed to those in need.
4. Abolishment of the couinty
agent's office.
5. Exemption of poor farmers
from taxes for one year.
6 . Abolishment of the electric
lighta new used along tbe Ugh
ways outsode of towns.
7. Free doctor car« to all un
Ä . . ._ . . .,
farmers^ ^
8 . Cash relief or work k, .1.
mTUn "* PW
UTmen -
Washington de ie ga ti„„ so far
which puts us in danger of not
being able to carry on. Comrades
in Washington should rally to our
support and send funds at once.
SAVE TRUCK OF
S. DAK. FARMER
d „ , delegate to
n ,® n eiected a deiegate to
go with him to call the sheriff.
He was told what to say and how
; , *
m " c , h *°. ;sa .^ ... , ... „
^ 5 TF arm a ln
minutes " d Ws sur f" ed ^ Me
I "JÜT puT^Yeu can't tekei
i ... p „ " t .
Sm
^rs^thtehtThest Mt
to sen and asked * 8end a
committee to Britton to see the
man who held the mortgage.
We elected a committee of seven
H. Tangen. Peter Smith, J. W. Ry
strom, Frank Heis, Roy Miller,
' J '
(Continued from Front Page)

Martl " , Tve '',' " d TT K T
Schnabel. We found Thorp, the
IT J 0( T * ut ? f ">?"/. who
looked as though he had never
done a day's work in his life. He
was well dressed, drove a nice new
car and had a big office.
j We told him we would not stand
1 ^ see f ft mily robbed. If
took their stock they would be
.on the county the next day. He
mad e us an offer to take a little
off the bill which was $292 plus
( $15 expenses.
This was still robbery, we told
him, and offered him just $50 for
all the mortgages he had against
the family. "That offer only
stands for right now" we said,
j "If y° u don't want to accept this
you'll have to deal with some other
committee. This stock is going
to stay on the place if we have
to keep some one there to guard'
| Thorp took the money and
turned over the papers. The fam
, ily still has its livelihood for the
1 "ÏST* . g. ,
j Only through united action can
j we exist with these wolveTs jump
at us from all sides.
;
Uni (H A V ACCM
j HUUÜAY AoOlN,
STOPS NEB SALE
VI Li illjU« \Jl\LiLi
(Continued from Front Pagv)
take place A com
1T; was ^ taKe place -
mittee of action was immediately
sent to see the banker. They ar
rived after bankln ^ hour s but ob "?
^ ained admittance to the bank and
dlscussed * be matter with the
banker . Discussed is a mild word,
^ fter a few Preliminary remarks
the banker asked the spokesman
for tbe H <> lida y wba t ba recom
mended.
-Th. Holiday Assn, doo, not
recommend." Lid ihe ioX, -it
demands. Akid we demand from
y.^ that all the machinery, live
stock, and grain be hauled back
to the farm of that poor lod
«.pK that you pay ÏÏTcosts
«f 8uch transportation, costs of
advertising the sale and that
you give an extension of at least
, ® ne year on this note."
**® ut I o» 11 '* do this," answered
th* banker, "t ha»e too much
money invested ïn this sal, all of
»Jlch -onld be Jo«."
You have but <> n e alternative.
do as we say or by God
well have 4,000 farmers in town
tomorrow morning to enforce
deman ds akid you'll be lucky
if y<m get the note."
The banker turned pale accord
ing to reports, and conceded to ali
the Holiday demands T>ia
erty was all hauled baP+o P
was mi named back to the
^
dition,^ fb?Z£S «ptced £
ft'r^ I " e 7 partsthat, ' adb « I
,lost ""s:
OFFER $50
Tax Reductions for
Home Workers in S. U.
1
j
i The Presidium of the Central
'Executive Committee of the Soviet
Union has decided to reduce taxes
paid by home workers and hand
I workers or artizans. Those home
and hand workers organized in
cartels are to be treated with re
gard to taxation exactly as Work
ers and commercial employees. Re
ductions have also been decided
upon for those home and hand
workers who employ no wage la
bor.
PROTEST SALE
OF MICH. FARM
_ _ _ ,
300 Farmer« Meet In Spite
„ _ - -, n.wii
I of Red Scare But Unable
to Stop Foreclosure
l P
Custer . Mich., No», i
9 the United Farmers League or
*** • "ration at the
T La,s \" is .. .
„ Laiskoms had not been able to
™* eTes * his mortgage due
S 1 ® Fe ?f ral Fanr l 1 Loa ; Bank . at
St / aal b ® caaSe ? f ^ farm prices
? ad ^\ ba ? k planned to deprive
him of his home.
•On Nov.
!
I Sympathetic farmers paraded
i through the streets, bearing pla
j cards reading "DoAvn with evic
tions" and "For a Moratorium on
Debts." It was the first time in
the history of Ludington that such
a thing has occurred.
The bankers and the press im
mediately tried to throw a red
scare into the people. They said
j "The reds will confiscate your
; homes," although it was against
I the confiscation of a farmer's
home that the farmers were dem
lonstrating. When the farmers
presented a resolution to the agent
in the Federal Land Bank, the
bankers had it gossipped all over'
town that he had been threatened.
The local press ran a story that!
the attorney had been threatened
j in order to force him to stop the
j foreclosure and that the sheriff
|and a number of state troopers
| and legionnaires would b e at the
sale to protect the attorney.
Despite the Communist scare,
about 300 people attended the sale.
One young comrade talked during!
the hour before bidding began,
However, the bank bought in all
of the property and the farmer
was left destitute.
The wily way the farmers
[around here can ston forced sales
and foreclosures is through mass
organisation. We must expect if
^Spt pLs^m^us reds
—"«
i we mugt struggle and how
; struggle—by mass action.
Following is the resolution which
W3S drawn U P b V the United Farm
ers League
6 ....
.
Jee Lai skoms, hard working
farmer of Custer, Michigan, h»
threatened with dispossession of
«is home and farm,
AND WHEREAS
Said farm is his only means of
an honest living.
bas P aid f°r said
S,
Pe^er^Snd
bank, of St. Paul seeks therebv to
protect its dividends atthe ex
pense of this man's means of ex
istence, and
I Therme, Laiskonis being fore
i closed is brutally unethical
Laiskonis is not to blame for
;the present anarchic system of
'economics which permits the cur
rent depression and is the cause
of his default.
Laiskonis has pleaded humbly
^ leniency,
The Federal Farm Loan Bank
of St. Paul has promised leniency,
Hoover has likewise promised
leniency, and
The government has advanced
billions to the railroads and banks
Enterprises to assure their
W "or tSl "** 0ne Pemly *°
farms >
We believe the farmer deserves
full vnlno VJ. 1 . „
^ - Ä^eVa ip tbe
!Zt T" 0 ? **2™ 01 S"""
''»" a wtalrk^ g ^
II. Interests 'of all poor farm
we can
122 VOTED RED
IN AITKIN, Mnn
Must, Step on it to
Delegates for F arm
Conference
Gs
ers'
Palisade, Minn.,
tion -is overhand '
Hooving with Hoover w e M
with Roosevelt. The elected
turns were a dissappoi n t ment *
the comrades. Foster and v
got 49 votes in & Ur local pr J2
—122 m the county, afte^^T
struggle. «K
Now that election is o«r tw
seems to be an inclination tT*
back and let things slide W **
having quite a time trying u> **
the farmers interested i
Farmers National Relief
ence.
instèadj
w
ffl the
Confeï.
POOR CONF ERENCE
MEETING
We had a crowded hall for
15th Anniversary of the R UssiaB
Revolution but only a handful t
the meeting to select a delegate t«
the Conference. We are holding.
second conference today fo r L
same purpose and hope f or betU.
results.
Of course money is scan* «
potatoes and rutabagas are nickd
a bushel and the coWs
dry. Returns
them as the
are almost
a fe small i m
price of butterfat
hangs around 20 cents. The prob
lem of getting gas to get the dele
gate out is more and
problem.
nwre of »
11 CENT LOSS ON A COW
A story is told here that Steve
Swartt shopped a cow to South St
Paul and got $2.40 and out of thi*
he had to pay the trucker $2.51
for expenses.
Another farmer shipped recently
10 head of stock and received $61
and paid out of that $20 for ex
penses, so you see the farmers
here aren't Croesuses.
| ao„ for them to be self rrlH«,
^° rkers "V '^county voted for
Foster and Ford, voted again*
I m,ser y aVld oppression, again*
Editor's Note; We don't think
the comrades in Aitkin county
should be dissappointed. There
might be, alnd probably is,
re»
and dissatisfied about the
f they carried on their work, or
the amount of work they put in
to the election campaign.
However, 122 farmers and
way
capitalism, despite all of the
demagogy spilled by the capital
\ ist parties, and particularly the
1 Farmer-Labor and Democratic
| fakers in Minnesota. In four
j local pretincts 49 voted for the
j revolutionary way out of the
crisis.
What these comrades should be
j dissatisfied with is that in a
I coukity with 122 Commuai*
votes the first conference to
elect a delegate to vo tj Wash
ington was so poorly attended
We hope that they have Rone
out despite their unwarranted
"dissappointment
made the second conference for
the election of a delegate a sue

e rs are mutual
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED
' That we support Joe LaiskoM
and secure a moratorium on hi»
debts until such a time as ece
j nomic conditions enable him to pay
them, and
I BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED
That we defend Laiskonis' home
by whatever means the govern
ment and the banks force us to
employ.
UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE,
Signed;
Frank Martlnchek,
Anthony Bafley,
George Casper,
I Quite a cooperative spirit haa tee"
! sh ^ WT1 Ä yea I , ln l . t î!
the main e items° of the 6 neighborhood
gossip includes prices and those
"pin feathers". It is reported
ÜTÂÜo.eÆ'SJt'A 1
week. „ M O , rom .
I Da ^e d a s^rud^rothlrs ^d Mari
n us Jensen to the Carl Hansen
on Thursday. The sale was 0 ^
community regrets very
departure of the Hansen famiiy ,
\T
for his cooperation with
^
i Ï. Kl?,
Edgar and Henry Syverud pÄ
to cÏLiS^leldUg^Â^te to the
Relief Conference at Washington^
£ Nothmg «eflnite however J*
h ?on^ Ul tlme P °that the
bachelors should be given a V»*.
J" 0 ?' consideration i^
j for Chlriey at^thlnext election,
Mr - and Mrs - Edwin Da ^' hn90n
Ä
hen on Friday night at hi»
^
Word has been received th« l >t
fhefr h^mTin Kin&rgCaHf. after
a tireeome trip. Mr. Hansen
1 from^lds^It i^wportVttot th<
raisin growing business and * r ^'*J^*
f a J r e e ^"■ 1 t îon ab time enC ° Ur
A large gathering
Morken Sunlay afternoon.
J- Sheidahi of Grenora condn^
Lutheran services " •
served a very delicious five o
ÄoT^Ä
'"»K.ÎÂÂÿ
C. M,a ' 0, '" ^
a!nd have
cess.
EAST
COALRIDGE
pale
very

relie f
rot*
s'
'clot*

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