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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, December 09, 1932, COUNTY EDITION, Image 1

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
pvery ufl member
A READER of the
PRODUCERS news
COUNTY
EDITION
PubUsh e< ^
VOLUME XV. Number 37
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
Entered u second Class Matter, October 18, 1818. at the Post*
office at Plentywood. Montana. Under the Act of March t. 1SU
PLENTYWOOD, SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1932
FARMERS unite !
WITH WORKERS
TO GET RELIEF
_ . « /"y
Call Meeting In Oregon
Town and Expose
r>„fi
SHOW UP JUDGE
WÄ ÄÄT
Shut Off
(BY R. L. HOGAN)
Bend, Oregon, Nov. 22 .—Faced)
* ith actual starvation conditions.
•fter three years of unemployment
farm crisis, the workers and
farmere of this sawmill town of '■
8 M0 population controlled by the
Bneks-Scanlon and Shevlin-Hixon j
to b«- barooa. are begmmng to,
a milltsnt Unemployed Coun
«Ü and fight back against the bos
ms' starvation system. !
In order to rally the unemployed
and part time workers of Bend to
carry on a determined struggle
aeainat the vicious discrimination
!fttie boss-controlled countv relief
TTnpmnlovjhd oT
aeency, p y
Bend called an open meeting of,
workers and farmers at Sathers
H° V E. DeAzmond,
« *•>
aL, Z r, aAl _ *
adequate relief. DeArmond ap
peared and spoke for an hour cr
so, shedding crocodile tears for the
plight of the workers and telling
ihem that they should not form
their own committees of action but
should be "pood citizens" and take
what the (rood kind relief board!
what the g °° d . kind board
h, it i °j a n« ho P ed tba ^
fte Unemployed Council would
cooperate with the relief board
>»d not cause them any trouble,
WORKFPS EXPOSE GRAFT
WORKERS KXPOSE GRAFT
CALL OPEN MEETING
fave them.
However, when worker after
... „ , .
th relief office as well as bring
«i?» out « masses where the stores
filling the already inadequate
worker took th© floor and exposed
the grafting and discrimination in
gro
eery orders had overcharged and
short-weighted the workers, De
Annond began to get nervous. The
workers raised militant demands
for the abolition of the highly
(Continued on Pace Two)
GOVT. DEMANDS
DEBT PAYMENT!
European Powers Remaiif
Firm In Refusal to
Pay
Both the British and French
governments have demanded the
postponement of payment of war
debt installments due the United
States December 15.
U. S. REMAINS FIRM
President Hoover remains silent
concerning these demands and
"ÎÂ U Â
of demanding payment. It is un
derstood that Congress will accept
no delay or remission on the war
debts unless the U. S. government
receive« substantial concession by
the debtor powers in colonies and
markets which will come under the
heel cf U. S. imperialism.
IMMINENT WAR DANGER
The war like nature of imperial
rivalries are shown in the
sharpened struggle over the war
debts, and the firm stand taken by
England and France on the one
hand and the United States gov
, e mment cn the other brings the
danger of war even closer to the
workers of the world.
FEAR WORKERS ACTION
The collapse of world trade is
Pointed to by the British note as
a danger signal to American cap
italism that the whole capitalist
structure will totter and the work
ers will move more rapidly to the
revolutionary way out, if de bt
Payments are pressed upon the
European governments. It says,
directions there are signs
°f paralysis of trad© and threat
»f bankruptcy and of financial «1
Great Britain has already threat
e ned to impose a special high tar
lf f on U. S. g oods.
. New York, Nov. 29.—The Brit
ls h pound dropped to an all-time
«cord low of $3.15% today. Eu
ropean currency showed a general
decline, the French franc also
dropping off slightly .
Insistence by th e U. S. govern
ment on payment of war debts is
contributory to the decline. Euro
Pean nations will point tc the in
^l.^rXSf'tot to
Ä KS* of the war
TO DIMINISH COSTS
! that the machine picks a bale of
i cotton at a cost cf $3.08 comnared
with $15. 1 5 for hand-picking.
■ an implement is far out
°* *he reach of southern tenants
and share-croppers. The machine
.will not only push many farm
workers off the farms but' it will
also reduce still lower tenants and
small owners who won't be able
to afford expensive machinery.
LEAGUE MAKE 1
_ , _ __ „ _
RAPID ADVANCE!
16 New Members Join In
Week- Senrl Tum #•«,
I ' , , * wo *°
1 Washington
- 1
(BY W. E. BROCKER) !
~ 0wen wis ._ Nov . 27 ,_ Thc
United Farme ; s League he , d a
mass meeting in the Elmwood
school house, Wednesday, Nov. 23,
which was addressed by Harold I
Olmstead of Superior. |
Olmstead explained the United
Farmres League program and cal
led upon the farmers present to
support the Farmers National Re
üe * Conference in Washington. It
was declded at this meeting tosend
delegates to the conference and to
collect finances for sending them.
ft.Lt.CT DELEGATES
farmers.
Harvey Witt and John Hetts
were elected ti go to Washington
and are we 1 on their way now.
Two other delegates from Tripoli
and C lea son picked up the Owen
i de egates Nov * 27 '
NFfa MFMRFRS JOIN
At the November 23 meetine 10
j ^At Uie^Wovemtoer 23
i.^ j , t hsrrintion«.
e ^ gu Producer« New«
-j ^Jhe N ?v p 2 5 meeting six new
thi United
I W e Mope to spread tue united!
Farmers League throughout more
townships as we develop struggles,
such as stopping forced sales. The
farmers will then see that we
mean business and aim to' keep
; our leadership only in the hands
|
j
I
;
I
i
90 Per Cent of Farmers
of the farm ers themselves,
UNABLE TO PAY
TAXES FOR 1932
Broke; County Will
Close Schools
!
1
i Copemis, Mich., Nov. 16.—Only
40 per cent of the farmers in
Manistee county paid taxes last!
year. There will be a lot more
who won't pay their taxes this
year. I don't believe 10 per cent
will be able to pay them.
(BY RUDOLPH ISAACSON)
THREATEN TO CLOSE
SCHOOLS
They are talking about closing
the school the first of the year, if
to*1aîS here are
Republicans and still believe there
j oresneritv around the corner.
" yOU faVOr
NEED FOR ORGANIZATION
With the crisis deepening we
must explain to them the good of
having an organization such as
the United Farmers League. Thru
it we can fight for the abolition of
taxes for poor farmers, prev^
morttrage sales, and demand relief
for the needy.
PEASANTS CLASH WITH POUCE
WHEN LAND IS SOU) FOR TAXES
MANY PEASANTS WOUNDED: TWO
KILLED OUTRIGHT
... . t v e nPOI> .
During the selling of P
er ty of peasants behind with tax
p a y men ts fierce collisions took
between masses of peasants
P - tb mythes and other pn
ar ^ "fand the heavily
, ,: e The collisions took
iTpftomka (Slovakia).
SCYTHES NO MATCH FOR
RIFLES
ne police f i r ©d at the peasants,
killing two J utr i? a ^^jl y W g?ythes
many others. Naturalig,
were of
rifles of the p • ^
the peasants is at boilmg pi^n
cause not only la f as a ^ ab f e J rop -
be f ». ^."/'^ocked down for a
erty is b ®| 2 » . a qr ite small
song m „ orde L ta nce b the case
debts. Fo bloody collisions
r. h, Ä to
RSSTL Ä* «" rment
FARM WORKERS
STRIKE AGAINST!
25 CENT PAY CUTi
I
Ranch Workers Also Get !
Hours Increased to Nine
and a Half

:
300 ON STRIKE
K-Iik. Solid Despite Entry
,
of the National
Guards
I
V ß ULL ETI N m
i Vaca ydle, Calif., Nov. 28.—At
a *^ eetln S of 509 strikers a com
J"**®®. w f f lec ted to Posent
+ v
™" d LlV he S° ss< f..
fiwed toSSrt Ïm, «. 'tSS T
tee. later decide™
outcome is not yet know,.
Do uald Bmgham and John
£°P? Z who . wer ^ arrested in a
* lght growing out of the attack
guards on the 300
. g tree pruners, were ar
Jr*: ff 1 * "® ld -J" J ail tf ™ der
gn . Dal1 and
. workers demon
""g* «S? *i jai1 T and d ?"
"|" d ? d th . ei * Lop f. z 18
T out and the International
abor Defense 18 handling the
cases * ,
JÄÄ Terfel
*?$
i£€S WsS
eieht to nine and a half
DEMOCRAT CUTS WAGES
The strike broke out under the
leadership of the Agricultural
Workers Industrial Union on the
Frank Buck ranch and has been
spread to nearby ranches. Imme
diately u P° n bein S elected to Con
Qn the Democratic ticket,
Buck announced the wage cut and
i also said workers would be re
quired to fumishe their own trans
, tion ^ work _ an ge t0
I * he w »' k « of 25
Spanish and Latin American
workers were the first to strike,
They were joined 100 per cent by
the Japanese and Filipino workers
after the bosses tried to get the
100 PER CENT SOLIDARITY
latter to scab. The workers have
so far blocked every attempt of
the bosses to put scabs on the job,
although the National Guard has
been sent out against them.
The strikers are in an advan
tageous position because the strike
takes place in the midst of the
■tree trimming season and all trim
Iming must be finished before the
rainy season sets in.
DEMAND $1.50 A DAY
Demands of the strikers include
$1.50 for an eight hour day; free
transportation; no discrimination
because of race or color; no evic
tions and also recognition of the
Agricultural Workers Industrial
Union.
! The bosses have offered $1.20
1 for an_ eightdiour day but the rank
j and file strike committee nas re
I fused this proposal.
. . ,
f-ü- £om htefaihoad »e have
B a > T abau t el £bt cen s per
dred pounds for hauling
The total crop won t even pay
half of the fertilizer bill. Money
has practicaUy disappeared from
circulation m this j"«mty. I have
sotne coming from farmers who 1
worked for this summer, i hey
are as broke as I am on account
I of poor prices, so can't collect.
! No Money In Circulation
In Dalbo, Minnesota
Dalbo, Minn., Nov. 30. —The
farmers out here receive 25 cents
per hundred pounds for potatoes,
Since we live
of overdue taxes amounting to 600
crowns ($18) only.
DETERMINED TO PREVENT
SALES
The peasants have succeeded in
preventing 8 a number of such sales
and they are in a state of despera
tion and capable of anything. If
there were rifles to be had a
regular insurrection would sweep
through the country against the
brutalities of to Czech author .-1
tl 6 f' t , , s session of the Czecho -1
i Ü MrUament th© commun
Slovak P d£manded ^ n i mme -
j, ;T ,t 0 .ho Trillin »? of the
neunte ' The communist^motion
was reiected by th© bourgeois dep
uHea with the support of the so
ciàî democrats.
Renew Your
Subscription Now
NEBRASKA FARMERS
STOP SALE BY USE i
OF MASS PRESSURE
Newman Grove, Nebr., Ncv.
16.—A sale was stopped by
farmers in Battle Creek last
Wednesday. It was a personal
property sale on a note for $290
plus interest. The note was re
newed for $200 and a year's ex
tension given. The $90 plus in
terest was a pure gain to the.
farmer.
A sale in Gordon, about 350
miles from here, was stopped
without a hitch by farmer mem
bers of the Holiday Associa
tion.
ONLY 12 CENTS
FDR POTATOES
Takes Four Bushels to Buy
One Pound of
Coffee
ParaSTS^'in",^ i
hunTredwdg™ f "rtheirpotaÆ
here in Benzie county. The (aim
e r has to sell, at that rate, foui I
bushels of potatoes t 0 buy one 1
pound of good coffee. He has to
se u 0Tie bushel of potatoes to buy
a loaf of bread. He doesn't get i
enough from his crops to pay for i
t be foodstuffs he has to buy. j
^ tXT , ri , l>aV
CANT PAY 1AXES ;
About 60 per cent of the farm
e rs have back taxes which they
can't pay. Last year many of the
farmers paid taxes on only part
-"d Ät|
*35 ÄW'&rt'l
doors and the farmers savings are
j gone.
ORf \MI 7 F PROTPrTIVP
I ORGANI E T .CT \L
UNION
The farmers are now organizing
- into a Farmers Protective Union
to prevent foreclosures of mort
gages, obtain higher prices for
farm products and lower taxes,
The farmers dent get a chance
to work on the road because the
county has taken over the,road
work and it gives the work to
f her w0 ? ers
farmers who pay for the improve
ments. Those who do have work
I on the roads get very low wages.
! Sometimes they get money and
j other times they have to work for
script.
(BY EDWIN HELGREN)
7 1 / p 1
I hnTTlhPT DT i OTT1T71PTPP r *OTITIC
Uß I U/I/IO
P O r , j .
1^/7777? v OTY1 I H til 1 SITIP^S I tlTPTP*sf*\
1 UIMi '-'VI II. i/I LJUÖU l CÖO MIlLriCÖLÖ
-
WII I MAT 0171 p rAPMITDQ 1M
**
ANY WAY
Another investigation has been
launched to "solve" the farmers.
The United States Chamber of
Commerce has organized a com
mittee to discover a solution for
tricably tied up with the wel
fare of agriodturo. I„ fact,
there is scarcely a person gain
tuUy employ«! who to not di
rec.ly affected by conditions ota
the farm. Consequently, the
farm situation is not the exclu
sive concern of the farmer, him
self. It to a major item in ainy
plan looking to the economic re
the agrarian crisis.
CAN'T MAKE MONEY IF
FARMERS CAN'T BUY
In order to make the farmers
believe that this investigation
might be of some use to them the
president of the Chamber Henry
I. Harriman, referred to the "de
pendence" of all of "us" on agri
culture.
"Fortunately, the disaster which
| has overtaken agriculture has
brought home to all of us the
plain truth that the welfare of
our urban population is inex
habilitation of the country.
COMMITTEE ALL RICH MEN >
The committee which has been
organized cons^ts of the follow
mg 17 "distinguished" men:
General Robert E. Wood presi
dent of Sears Roebuck and com -
pany, will be chairman of the com
mittee.
_ _ ...
Lyman E WakeMd president
of the First National Bank, of
Minneapolis. ...
Sydner Anderson, vice president
General Mills, Inc.
.Burton F Peek vice president,
Simonds-Shields-Lonsdale Gram
Co *' I ^ ansaa City * ^
* L. Wilson, head department
of agricultural economics, Mon
tana State college,
R. R. Rogers, assistant secre
tary Prudential Life Insurance Co.
0 f America,
H . A Wallace, editor. Wallace'.
Farmer, Des Moines.
Earl c * Snuth > P«« d «nt, Illinois
Agricultural association.
Harper Sibley, managu.g direc
tor, Sibley farms, Rochester, N. Y.
H. R, Safford, vice president,
Missouri-Pacific railroad.
Cornelius R. Berrien, vice presi
Central-Hanover Bank and
m p \r 0tlT
Tro rt Ce .. New Yo r k City .
Wenden Endic tt, Boston.
A H. Stone, president, Long Sta
FARMERS FROM WEST ARRIVE IN
WASHINGTON, D. C.; LET UNEMPLOYED
PARADE AFTER A STRONG PROTEST
I
: .
POUCE ARMED
Herd Workers Into Empty
L " 2ra, w " h
WORKERS PROTEST
1
.
Washington, D. C. Dec. 6 —
Hunger Marchers were finally
allowed to march through the
city of Washington to the capi- (
tot grounds. Demands ft>r relief
were handed to Vice President
Curtis, Speaker Garner* and other
government officials whose hos
tile attitude to the dire need» of
the unemployed stows workers
clearly that these represent*
,he a ' >unlr> -_
hunger marchers have arrived in
Washington to petition the gov
ernment for winter relief for the
unemployed of this country. About
3,000 are in Washington already,
an d more are on the way.
j The federal government has
.shown its attitude to the unem
ployed by refusing the marchers
i permission to parade in front of
the capital. It has kept the march
e rs prisoners in an encampment a
few miles from the capitol and has
p i aced a guard of 450 police
arouod them armed with ^uos.
tear gas and smoke bomb®.
lxrrm « TT , A *, _ .. _
INTIMIDATE HALL
OWNERS
■ It was reported by Police Com
! (Continued on i-a*e Two)
___We
Win Right to March to
Capitol and Present
Demands
BULLETIN
pie Cotton association, Dunleith,
Miss.
A. C. Hardison, vice président
and manager, Hardison Ranch Co.
Santa Paula, Calif.
N. P. Hull president Grange Life
Insurance Co., Lansing, Mich.
John A, Law, president, Saxon
Mills, Spartanburg, S. C.
From this group the farmers are
supposed to get "recommendations,
. . . . for measures, legislative or
otherwise, which might be taken
for its (agriculture's) improve
ment in the national interest."
REPRESENT RULING CLASS
Of the 17, Wakefield and Ber
Hen represent the great banks;
Anderson, Theis and Stone repre
sent the monopolies dealing in ag
| ricultural products; Peek repre
I senta the machine trust; Rogers
and Hull represent the robber in
suran ce companies; Sibley and
Harrison represent the rich farm*
erg . Endicott and Law represent
the corporations processing agri
cultural products; Safford repre
gen t s the plundering railroads;
Wond renresont« th» Ardor
house* which live off of the farm
e^T JdÆn WaltoLSd
Sm ' ith are the "friends" of the :
farmers whose profe8sion it is to<
make ^^tural "relief plans.''
Parom thes © the farmer? can ex
pect nothing but new plans for
carrying on their old robber ac
tivities. Only from the farmers
aaM€l ^ ^ m real of
and the means to mke these
plans effective— man* action.
^ Farmers National ReUef
Conference, meeting in Washing- (
^ Dec 7 . 10 will outline these
p]ana ^ organize the
era to fight for them.
j
CMcag0 _ N „
hibiters took first place in five
0 f the six wheat classes at the
International Grain an d Hay show,
Montana stands first in durum and
white winter wheat, white spring
wheat, hard red winter, and soft
]? d w ! nte . r ^heat. Canada took
th !P nze m hard rtd 8 P r ®» wheat *
some of trio finest wheât in vn 0
wor , d Me practicaU> . dMtitute .
Their wheat doesn't even bring
them the cost of production.
MONTANA FARMERS
PRODUCE FINEST
WHEAT IN WORLD
BULLETIN
The 3,000 Hunger Marchers now in Washing
ton, representing at least 40,000 members of Unem
ployed Councils throughout the country and thou
sands more unorganized workers make the follow
ing demands upon the federal government:
1. $50 winter relief, from the federal govern
ment in addition to local relief.
2. Federal unemployment insurance at the ex
pense of the employers and the government, and
not workers.
The Farmers National Relief Conference which
meets in Washington December 7-10 will take
the following demands to be presented to Cong
1. Debt moratorium.
2. Stopping of all foreclosures, tax sales or
evictions of farmers.
4. Cash relief to all ruined farmers.
The veterans who
Washington demand:
I. Immediate payment of the bonus to ex-sol
up
ress:
:
now on their way to
are
diers.
2. No cuts in disability allowances.
TR ICC TA ADDCCT
I1U " ,u AKK " 1
FARMERS IN IOWA!
_
jvi . . f
to Conference
Win Release Through
o i; i », ,
ooiiaaniy
~
(BY ,WM. FERGUSON)
clinton Iowa w . v ™ Wo
W€ r. at
a , , s halltown the 29th ajid,
. , er .t t î^ ay *. T £ e
^ j. 0 .^ fi rst truck and or
10 ** ***** ^
dro Y® ri2at u B. ß b /l lde th ®
^ police chief began to
eat out of our hands, like a g^od
dog. Shows what united action
Wld d °*
OLD FARMER TALKS
had a meeting in Marshal-jT
town and tonight we had one in
this town. We were all glad to
hear C. J. Christianson of New
man Grove, Nebr., talk. He is an
old man and crippled.
rea L forceful talk in language
that ^ farmers ^ ^^5 c an
understaid.
R°Y Miller, Charles Taylor and
I also spoke on the necessity for
organization.
He gave a
GOT A GOOD START
We found that the workers and
farmers her© had already held
two meetings and had a start of
200 members. They admitted that
they had not built their oiganiza
tion on a militant basis. They said
they would get a larg© hall for us
on our return from Washington
and advertise a big meeting.
They were certainly good to us
and showed us th© best they know
^ The Unem lo d c* uncil took
care of us in gioux Fallg j agked
a w0ma n member what they were
d >
("We get $1.76 to $2 a week in
""halTmUeT dra*
four aaa a ha |f miI ® s and drag
0Ur cbddr en with us to get it.
«all
h . v l as packad ^ u l., for a
^ 2 alth «ugh
'^TÆmomJÎ Ioffe °cî to
j farmers who lived nearby gave
speeches that showed they were
ready for a change from the pres
ent system. The farmers and on
employed council are getting to
g e fber fine here.
, We are in ho P 68 °f meeting a
., rge caravan of farmers in Coun
how.
BIu / f u althougb we have been
° f wddenta -
WISCONSIN FARMERS THREATEN
STRIKE AT LOW MILK PRICES
GET ONLY $1 PER HUNDREDWEIGHT
FOR SURPLUS MILK
Milwaukee, Wis., Nov. 26.—The
^ tate Department of Agriculture
has set a price for December de
b 1 , 1 ^ a * _^- 60 P e ^
dredweight for 8.6 per cent test
fluid milk in the Milwaukee area.
u j 8 , a • ff t . a V T \ ce $1 per
hundredweight for all surplus.
THREATEN STRIKE
Dairy farmers receive hardly
enough for their milk to buy feed
for their cows, much less clothe
and feed their families. When a
conference of producers and deal
called to set December
prices, the farmers endeavored to
win from the trust a price which
would insure a decent standard of
living. This the dealers refused
to do. Farmers threatened to
strike against the low prices of
fered by the trusts.
PRICES TOO LOW
The Stat© Department of Agri
ers was
!RANI IC MADPHCDC
MARCHERS
DEMAND PAYMENT
i
_ -
3,000 Gather In Wash
in of on fn Petition
r etltion
Congress
i -
1 Washington, Dec. 2.—With
lthan 3 ' 000 ex ' servi cemen already
i fa WashingtoT1 and large
marc hing from all parts of the
t country to demand at the opening
of Congtess Dec. 5 immediate
ment of th e boifus and'noVdtsrin
MizabiUty allowances, the Veterans
National Rank and File Commit
' tee in a statement issued today,
| ca lied on all groups of bonus
marchers to elect their own rank
1 and file committees and report at
jthe bonus mardi hearduarters 905
St., N. W., as soon as they ar
:
FULL EQUALITY FOR
NEGROES
Instructions to the bonus march
rive in Washingtin.
ers also urge th© full participation
of rank and file vets in all pro
posals and decisions, the registra
tion of the vets by their own rep
resentatives, the inclusion of Ne
gro veterans on all committee and
a de ^ erm i ned struggle against all
tempts to segregate the Negro
ve l s 7 D ,_, „ ...
^ he Kank d Fi. ( jT-lr*
a So ^pounced that, in addition to
P re |entmg a petition for the im
m .^ iat ® payment of the bonus
without cuts in disability allow
ances * th e märchers will J obl i n a
mass rxbute to Hushka and Carl
Son ',^ be , v ^ eran ^. wba w ® r ®.
IT ur .. } ® d wb 11 be poke© attacked
itbe first bonus marchers on Bloody
I msday, J ly 28.
Many of the ex-soldiers are hop
I
. . ___ T
P in f freigbt tra }. ns g et to Wash
i ir l 5 toI l' wh ® re tb ®y have been un
f. , ge * f^u^ks. Railroad po
CWca"t veferan" nU Uma^OhW,
and ne bonus marcher was so
badly beaten tbat he had be
sen t back to Chicago. The Rank
and File Veterans Committee in
d ign ant i y protests this inhuman
treatmen t of their comrad e,
CHOPPED TO $15 PER MONTH
Fallon, Nevada, Nov. 21.—The
wages in large ranches for farm
hands have been chopped to $16 a
month, figuring board and all.
Many small and middle farmers
will not be able to pay taxes here
and officials fear a tax strike
which is being advocated by the
United Farmers
culture then stepped in and set
|the prices givwi above. These
pri ce 8 don't satisfy th© dealers
who want to make even more pro
fits at the farmers' expense,
Neither do they satisfy th© farm
ers who can't make a decent liv
in g at such ruinous prices.
CALL ALL MILK 'SURPLUS'
Farmers get paid at the rate of
$1.60 per hundredweight for only
a small portion of their milk. The
dealers call a great percentage of
the milk "surplus" and pay only
$1 per hundredweight for it. The
farmers have no way of checking
up on the dealers and have had
to accept these ruinous prices
while the dealers made money.
Only by a militant stand such
as was taken by the farmers
around Sioux City last summer can
th© farmers in the Milwaukee area
hope to win better prices.
i SIXTY IN GROUP
Nebraska Delegates Arrive
First; Others are on
Way
AT TOURIST PARK
Chicago, III., Dec. 1.—We are in
the heart of the city. We just had
supper and are in the Workers'
hall. Our car is the scout car.
, Q Ur carava n split at Clinton,
ilowa. The Nebraska delegates
made the trip by way of Sioux
At Marshalltown, the police
groups'jumped on our car ud took us to
the police station. When they
found we were farmers, they re
pay-Jleased ue. Thev let us stay at the
CoSeum Û.JI digiK.*
Last night westayed at worker»
hall in Clinton, Iowa. About 200, -
i families are on the soup line there. .
I
*
Farmers Eyes Opened By
Trip Across the
Country
BULLETIN
Washington, D. CL, Dee. 6.—
The first delegation of 60 farm
ers has arrived in Washington
from the west. The farmers ar
rived by truck atad automobile
from Nebraska, Idaho, Wyoming,
Oregon, Michigan, Illinois and
Iowa.
They are staying at the Wash
ington tourist Camp and so far
have been free from policé in
terference.
(BY OTTO GRANTHAM)
WILL HOLD MEETINGS
ON RETURN TRIP
(
farmers all the way so we can 1
hold meetings on the way back, i
From here on everything is ar- :
ft We hold * fa ™«* meet - '
mg tomorrow night at Syracuse, •
Ind., north of Warsaw, Ind. We
expect the Minnesota and Wiscon
sin delegates here tonight.
01d corn in Iowa is worth nine
cents a bushel; they can't sell new •
com at all. There ar© millions of 1
bu^els piled up on the ground and,
acres 0 f ca bbage are rotting in
t ^ e f{ e j d ,
Q ne of tke f armers on th© Ne- r
braska delegation ate on the soup
jj ne j us ^ see what it was like..
He got up and spoke about it and ,■
almost broke down while he was
talking. This trip is sure doing •
us a n good. We never knew be-,.
fore how bad it wag<
CORN NINE CENTS A
BUSHEL
I*
SCHLEICHER TO
HEAD GERMANY
Pres. Hindenburg Appoint
Army Head to Replace
Von Papen
i
Berlin, Germany, Dec. 2.—Lieut!
General von Schleicher will be th<
new chancellor of Germany, taking :
the place of Von Papen. He wai
appointed by Hindenburg and wil:
attempt to form a new cabinet re i
sponsible only to Hindenburg rm
mediately.
Schleicher is minister of defnec i
and also commissioner of Prussia j
He thus is in charge of the regu'
lar army and the Prussian poli«
His appointment is a direct ste ; 1
by the ruling class to set up , 1
military dictatorship.
COMMUNISTS ONLY REAL
OPPOSITION
Both the Social Democratic par
ty and the Fascists under Hitle :
have made no real opposition t /
Schleicher. The Communist part J
is the only party that is definite) j*
fighting Schleicher. It appeals t j'
all workers to take up a unite» 1
stuggle against the fascist offer ;
sive of th.e ruling class.
[
I
•C
»
-
CAN'T GET MONfeY,
FARMERS HAVE TO
TD A rvr tucid aadi
» KAUL I rTUlK. vAJKJ
and
one
f
Stuart, Iowa, Nov. 21.—A shav
a haircut here costs three
one half bushels of corn. A ha
cut alone requires two bushel* «
(corn. Farmers may also tra<
ar
U
Si
corn for gasoline,
Farmers who are not able to s<
their products for cash find th;
they have to resort to barter ' *
r
i get the things they need Uf Ih

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