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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, February 10, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, Image 1

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
COUNTY
fvery ufl member
a reader of the
producers news
EDITION
1,
P..KIwIwh 1 Weekly
_ OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE _
PLENTYWOOD, SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1933
VOLUME XV. Nombre 46
Entered a« second Claas Matter, October II, 1111, at the Poat
nfflce at Plentywood. Montana, Under the Act of March S. 1ITI
insurance companies FORCED
TO HALT FORECLOSURES; IOWA
FARMERS' ACTION IS EFFECTIVE
NEW YORK LIFE i
Iowa Farmers Threatened
Company's Lawyer With
Rope at Foreclosure
NFW MANOF.UVER
Farmers Must not be Lulled
Into Inactivity by Par
tial Victory
In order to stem the rising re
volt of. the Iowa farmers against
, 'ware, and evictions the New
York Life and the Aetna life In
line« companies, have suspended
foreclosure activities in that state
ornrilv
y
* . ... ,• _ i
The first «top m this action was
president Buckneî made a
SSLSTto this effect' on Jan.
■ut it followed on the request of
Herring cf' Iowa who
Governor
mggested to the life insurance
companies that no foreclosures be '
undertaken until the legislature |
The insurance companies are not
planning similar action In other
stat<*. The excuse given for the
actions in Iowa is that the situa
It i*
but not in the way
had had time to act.
IOWA IS "PECULIAR"
dern there is "peculiar.
"peculiar,
that the insurance companies say.
The "peculiarity" they have talked
shout in the press, is that in Iowa
fireclofiures have been demanded
by second mortgage holders.
The real "peculiarity" which the
New York life Insurance company
knows about thru its experience,
but which was not mentioned in
the statement of Buckner, is that
the fanners in Plymouth nounty
threatened to hang an agent of
the New York Life when he bid
less than the full amount ofj a
farmers mortgage en Jan. 4. By
bidding less than the amount of
the mortgage the farmer would
have bail a deficiency judgment
hanging over his head. The farm
U'ontlmiod «n P*»*. -Two)
BANKERS START
SCHEME IN NEB.
„ , . I P ,
The politician* and the bankers
»*
"Voluntary Adjustment
Boards Organized to
Rob Farmers
in Nebraska, have started their
own program of "conciliation" in
order U> stop the struggle against
foreclosures and evictions.
Governor Bryan appointed a
semi-official committeed to work
with similar local committee«
to rob the farmer* peacefully. The,
board, according to the governor,!
"will act as a voluntary adjust
ment board until a refinancing
program for agriculture can be
worked out by Congress." The
governor wants to pass the buck
for legislation to Congres» and
maintain the hope« of the farm
er* In Congress.
"1 AIK AND EQUITABLE
ADJUSTMENTS"
"The fir»t of March la rapidly
approaching/* continued the gov- I
«rnor in his statement "That fa |
the time for farm settlements. In- ;
tercKt payments, extending mort- !
Rages and renewing leases, and 1 j
fael that a board of conciliation
•hould be created to assist In the
hnnguig about f a l r and equitable!
:::rr Mwecn ,iobto " a,,d ,
TV loci committee, which will
** »opoioted for this benefit work !
»il he composed of II,. loci ,
bu*lne«men who win a «
thing 5 their power £ Z
possiWe "settlement" for the
"«'kern.
Fauui'h«
KMKRS ^PRESENTATION
If such rammiif . ... .
«I the LTm . T
the, »rc X*. .ï! th,t
"»tali™ "'"'. .a ."."J"
elect their ,, wn ri ' lh * 1 .f h,y
Bä CJTÎÎÎ
lltld rtl#ni Wd '^closures by
«houl i ."T Rct,on 1f th ® fa>ard
•Mnstot on thi. policy of tha
»
$400,000,000 IN
INSURANCE CO.
LOANS IN IOWA
The latest figures available on
insurance company mortgages in
Iowa are published i n the annual
repo it of the New York State Sup
erintendent of Insurance as of
Dec. 31, 1931. They show that
Equitable Life Assurance Society
ha« the largest stake in Iowa, with
$90,040,000 of mortgages on the
farms. The Metropolitan Life had
on that date, $64,423,000 in Iowa
farm mortgages, the Prudential
had $26,059,000 and the New York
Life $1,838,000.
These total* represent mot the
face amount of the mortgages, but
the amount of the principal re
i "lining unpaid. They are re
P° ,ted to b ® th ® same as amounts!
outstanding at the end of 1932.
^ revea l tha t of total farm
mortgages of $618,706,000 held by
all these companies, $182,360,000
^ on Iowa propertiM io£
Mortgages on Iowa farms held P
at the end of 1931 by the fifteen
l® adin 8 companies licensed to
writ ® »f® France la New York
State follow: I
jin
$14,066,000
86,181,000
8,148,000
Aetna Lifo
Banker» Life
Connecticut General
Connecticut Mutual
Equitable (N.Y.) .
j Equitable (Iowa)
John Hancock ....
Metropolitan .
National Life ....
Naw York Ufa ..
j Northweatam Mutual— 4O3O0JOW
.... 26,069,000
.... 10,610,000
.... 11,233,000
12,479,000 j
90,040.000
50,098,000
88,252,000 •
64,428,000 '
6,467.000
1,888,000
I Prudential .
Travelers ......
j Union Central
j INSURANCE CO.'S
|HOLD BILLIONS
This table, showing a total of
more than $370,000,000, indicates
that theie is outstanding with life
insurance companies thruout the
country approximately $400,000,
000 in mortgage« ( >n farms in the
one state cf Iowa.
IN MORTGAGES
The following table show« the
totals of farm mortgage« outstand
ing with various leading compan
ies at the end of 1931:
$ 63,408,000
, 66,341,000
Aetna.
Bankers Life
. 21,747,000
Connecticut Gen-l.
Connecticut Mutual .... 39,890,000
Equitable (N.Y.)
Equitable (Iowa) . 64,178,000
John Hancock .
Metropolitan .
Mutual Benefit ....
National Life .
New Yoik Life ..
N'westem Mutual
Penn. Mutual .
.Phoenix Mutual
| p rovldent Mutual . 7 929,000
209.248.000
78,966.000
188,920,000
196,682,000
.... 174,536,000
.... 184 594,000
.... 160,270,000
.... 88,720.000
.... 26.003,000
.... 216,506,000
.... 16.800,000
. 30,616,000
_ ,
to Buy Auto Licenses
Prudential .
Travelers .
Union Central
1 - - —
| Farmer» Will Refuse
_ ^
Greeley, Jan. 31. y
Uv farmers, organized into the
Farmers Holiday
refused to buy 1933 license plates
ftw tb «fa autoB a!nd tn J ckfl untu
J IR® legislature reduces t e ees.
This decision was retched upm
adoption of a resolution at the or
ganization meeting at Greeley of
nearly 400 farmers and bu«iness
men. Joe McCarthy, Greeley was
elected presided! of the county
J group
I
Oklahoma"Farmers Threaten to Smash Red Cross Doors
„ .
(By a Farmer Correspondent)
aw»*, oh»., j«n. 2».-i* «,«
H* rur "' //'^«To^c
« There are
tal , lle, ' >"• ^„t"re ln
'only between 50 and 60 voter* w
^^ecinct and It i* considered a
tow ™ ,lip - ^° U (
it went Democratic as every one
knew it would. The encouraging
thnig about it is that 10 out of the
60 voters refused to vote for
'■itt'T Hoover or Rooeevelt. Thl.
happened in a community where
-rarcely any of th. p«pl* "»
road or write and never heard of
But thfy ,re hun ™
naked>
This county is strictly an agrl
cu i tU ral district. There Is no manu
factoring ef any kind in the coun
HUGE HOLDINGS
Insurance Company Heads
Determined to Get Most
Out of Farmers
Insurance Companies Hold
LENIENCY" MOVE
* *
$1,700,000,000 of Farm
Mortgage*
I .. . VT v , ...
84:11011 ^®w ^ or * t
(France Company fa. suspending
| mortgage foreclosures in Iowa has
1)6011 followed by other leading in
| J companh*.
' The threat of miUtant action by
I the farmers has become so serious
that the Prudential Insurance Co.
America has announced atop
in * ot all foreclosure proceedings
on farm^ thruout the country on
which it holds mortgages.
The Prudential is the largest
single holder of farm mortgages
the country, having $209,248,
ooo invested in about 37,000 farms
t the end of 1931.
It is reported that the remftin
er ^ the Insurance companies
wiU follow the lead of the
Prudential.
Latest estimates, by the Asso
ciation of IJfe Insurance presi
dents, indicate that the total of
farm mortgages outstanding In the
hands of the life insurance com
panies at the end of 1982 was
nearly $1,700,000,000.
CONCENTRATED IN SEVEN
STATES
The Insurance company farm
mortgage holdings are c olncen
Piilfe Two)
• Continued •»•>
FARMERS MUST
PAYSAYSBANK
Chicago Bank Reveals That
Farmers Will be Robbed
to Limit if Possible
The Chicago Joint Stock
bank has hastened to tell the farm
ets of Iowa that it has no inten
tion of stopping collecting inter
est cn it* bends. I*ast week In
Plymouth county, two agent« of
the bank made a deal with a farm
by which the two years' Inter
est due on his $16,000 mortgage
was cancelled and the mortgage
reinstated.
O. H. Noel, assistant receiver
for the bank, when told of the
deal, stated that this did not mean
that the bank had changed it«
policy, and that furthermore, the
farmer who has his Interect can
celled was paying for it.
"Campbell's case might have
merited some special considéra- •
tion," Mr, Noel said. "Other case«
will be handled on their own
merits. I do not know the terms
of the agreement made with
Campbell by our agent, Jacob
Grest, but I am sure Campbell will
not stay on the farm for nothing,
There mu*| be eofadltfcms to the
agreement that wlU give us some
thing."
Regardles« what It might mean
for the farmer» the bankers do
mand such conditions that "will
give us (the bankers) something."
er
Most of the people have al
been renters and what few
ty.
owned their farms had them mort
have lost
gaged and of course
them now. The result is that the
Ixian companies own most of the
county. The price of farm pro
ducts went down so that the rent
from the land would nothing like
pay the taxee, *o of course the
loan companies let the farms go
for the taxe», or charged the
farmer cash rent which he i* not
able to raise. In some cases the
farmer Is required to pay $50 for
the use of the house above the
Th* house» and barn» are going!to
crop rent.
HOUaSES AND BARNS GOING
TO RUIN
h
ich Get 90 Per Cent
of R.F.fc. Loans Direct
*
During the eleven months of operations of the Re
construction Finano Corporation during 1932 the cap
italist class received 90 per cent of the $1,648,622,393
cash actually distributed. The destitute farmers and the
city workers got at the most 'ten per cent of this huge
sum.
On crop loans the farmers received $64,204,506, of
which $16,707,080 has been repaid as a result of the
hounding of the government collectors. The states and
their political subdivisions received $100,993,175 for re-1
lief purposes.
The rest of tlv huge funds doled out by the RFC
was distributed amo ig the capitalists as follows:
Banks, insurance companies, building and
loan associations, railroads and others: $1,427
603,122.
Regional Agricultural Credit Corporations:
$35,768,618, (for rich farmers and big landown
ers).
Construction of self liquidating projects (the
great "public works program"); $17,793,000.
Carrying and orderly marketing of agricultural
commodities (to aid speculators and "co-opera
tives"); $1,439,974.
INDICT SHERIFF
IN GUN ATTACK
At Least Five Businessmen
Aided Sheriff in Bloody
Attack
mer Sheriff Tilton, and five busi-1
nessmen have been indicted by the
grand jury for the shooting of 14
farmers last August during the
farm strike around Sioux City.
Those indicted are Harrison
Steele, bank president; Ralph
White, an employe of Steel's bank,
ex-Sheriff Tilton, Dr. Forrest
Barns, Claude Bensely and six
others.
The farmers were shot when
several cars drove past their camp
on the picket lines near Sioux City
and fired on them without warn
ing. At the time of the shooting
the sheriff disclaimed any knowl
edge of the assailants.
The sheriff who was afraid to
attack the farmen» In broad day
light, tried to murder them at
night. In this he was elded by
the businessmen accomplices of
the milk trust.
Eleven persons, including for
FORCED SALE IN
W1S- BRINGS $1.35
District Attorney Threatens
Fanners With Charge
of "Rioting
and 'was then turned back to Mrs.
Hermaneon.
When Sehock put In a bid for
$86 the fa r mers told the auction
1 eer that the bid was not to be
accepted, escorted Sebock out on
the road where they kept him out
of mischief until the sale had been
concluded.
The district attorney of Jeffer
son county U trying to brow beat
j the farmers with th r eats of court
( action. He h«» threatened to
| issue warrants for eleven of them
charging "rioting."

Jefferson, Wis., Jan. 19.—One
separator went for 16 cents and
12 cows for 10 cents a piece when
250 farmers participated in a
Sears and Roebuck sale near here
on Jan. 16. The separator and the
cows were the property of Her
man Hermaneon. One Otton Se
bock held a chattel mortgage on
them. The lot was sold for $1.86
MANY FARMER CHILDREN WITHOUT CLOTHES
DURING MOST OF YEAR; ONLY MEAGER
RED CROSS RELIEF
.... ,
to ruin so that the fanner cannot
Veep his family and stock properly
protected from the cold winter
weather. The fence» are down
an( j ou tside stock eat up the crop
bef^r« ho can gather It. In 80me
par t a 0 f the county where there
is a little timber left the farmers
have taken to tie-hacking f° r an
existence. Thl» affords them 26
80 cents a day for the hardest
!
jFARM YOUTH IN
MINN. CONFERS
Young Fanners Will Take
Part in Minnesota
Hunger March
Virginia, Minn., Feb. 4.—In the
face of growing mass resistance to
foreclosures, sheriff's sale«, 123
farm youth delegates met in Vir
ginia, Minn., on Jan.. 29, to out
line plans and activity to win re
lief for the youth of Minnesota.
The conference was marked by de
tailed reports from various lo
calities and sections of Minnesota.
The delegates hod been elected
from mass meetings, various and
youth organizations, sports clubs,
and local house meetings. All of
the delegatee spoke on the grow
ing resistance of the farmers to
loss of their homes and pointed
out increasing role of the farm
youth in the militant action« tak
ing place.
The main report for the provis
ional Committee, was given by
Elmer I*apakko, and dealth with
the situation nationally, and with
the conditions of the farm youth
in Minnesota. Following the main
report, the various delegates also
pointed out their activities and
particularly the methods used to
win youth to the militant program
of the Farmers National Relief
Conference.
STATE YOUTH COMMITTEE
OF ACTION
The conference elected a State
Youth Committee of Action of 16
members to prepare the farm
youth for the coming State Work
ers and Farmers Relief March on
February 20.
A slate of youth demand« was
drawn up and was ratified unani
mously, The main demands were:
1. No discrimination against the
youth in getting relief work.
2. Free medical and dental ser
vice to all needy and unemployed
workers and farmers.
8. Hot lunches, free transporta
tion and clothing to children of
unemployed, and needy poor farm
ers.
4. No forced labor at «täte for
est reserve projects, and all Wages
to be paid in cash.
6. Free sports equipment and
facilities for all farm youth.
6. Establishment of libraries In
rural communities, and youth in
(Continued from Page Two)
Many of the farmer»' children
^ ave ^ en out 0 f 8C hiool all year
becaUBe Q f insufficient clothing,
j n Cross
pnomi««« a little help in tse way
c j pt hlng for the children, but
tW# dj( j n0t arr i ve until after the
f j rBt January, and then In such
meager quantities that It fa very
little good.
kind of work.
DESTITUTE FARMERS, MADE
DESPERATE BY RED CROSS,
DISTRIBUTE RELIEF GOODS
1
FOUR WOUNDED
IN PICKET FIGHT
Open Fire on Farm Pickets;
Sheriff Refuses to Arrest
Assailants
In a fight with pickets on the
I highway, four miles north of Rlv
j erside, South Dakota, three truck
ers were wounded by gunshot on
Friday, Feb, 3 one picket was also
wounded.
R. D. Markell, of Elk Point, the
I owner of the truck, suffering from
j two rifle bullet wounds in the ab
tHe is not expected to live.
eats Markell and Harry Mar
I keil, two sons of R. D. Markell,
suffering from buckshot wounds
loj
about the face and head. Keats
also had a finger on his left hand
shot off with a rifle bullet.
Both sons weie concealed in the
back of the rtuck among the milk
cans, waiting to open fire on the
pickets.
The fourth casualty, Nile Coch-1
ran, of Moville, said to have been
one of the picketers, suffered a ;
slight scalp wound. He was taken j
to the police station where he is I
being hied on an open charge.
Steps were taken in Sioux City,
Saturday, Feb. 4, by Sheriff Tom
Collins of Union county, South Da
kota, and State Attorney G. C.
Donley to extradite Nile Ccchran,
Moville, Ia. f farmer, to South Da
kota on a charge of assault with
a deadly weapon. The strike pick
et, who was held in jail here, was
accused in Iowa of being a fugi
tive from justice. When arraig
ned in municipal court Cochran's
bond Svas fixed at $3,000 which he
failed to furnish.
Extradition papers for submit
tance to Governor Clyde Herring
I have been prepared and will be
I dispatched as soon as Governor
Tom Berry of South Dakota makes
a formal demand for the prisoner.
A hearing on the extradition re
quest probably will be held In Dee
Moines within 10 days.
RAN STRIKE LINES
|
The Markell* ran the strike lines
last fall and since that time have
been antagonistic to the farmers.
On Friday they tried to get a
1,000 gallon, load from Elk Point,
South Dakota, to Sioux City, de
spite the warning« of the farro
ers.
The Markels were preceded by
the sheriff who tried to convince
the farmers that they should let
the truck through. The farmers
refused and put two telephone
poles across the road to »top the
truck.
TRUCKERS FIFED FIRST
Th© »heriff and many witnesses
to the fight admit that the first
shot» came from the Markell truck.
The sheriff fa repotted to have
taken no part in the fight, since
he saw himself "outnumbered."
One of hi» deputies received a
black eye from the picketing farm
The farmers demanded that
ers.
the «heriff arrest the Markells for
starting the shooting, but he took
only the wounded picket to jail.
Frocmont, Neb., Feb. 8.—By a
notice posted on its front door,—
signed by its president, Frank
Hammond, the Union National
bank Friday Informed depositors
it has declared a 80 day mora
torium on business.
It has capital stock of $160,000
and surplus of $60,000 according
to its Dec. 81 statement.
THREATEN TO SMASH RED
CROSS DOORS
Several times in the l**t month
the crowds gathered round the
Rod Cross headquarters in the
county seat were so desperate they
threatened to smash the doors. On
January 1 hundreds of families
went to town for the purpose of
securing Red Cross aid. The local
committee refused to open the
doors because It was a legal holi
Most of the schools will
close down now for the lack of
funds and hundreds of children
have rot gone to school a day.
This is the kind of free education
the State of Oklahoma is provid
ing for It* p®opl®.
day.
r
Joints
y
oi
Pw A
t:
f
Ip» *+
YOUR RED CROSS
NEEDS YOU
...... vo - ¥C , 0
ALWAYS I- Iro
' "Your" Red Oosb needs you—
needs your money. But when
* ou *®®d "your" Red Cross, you
Bnhl, Idaho, Jan. 29.—There fa
&n interesting story going
around here. Everybody kn |ws
all about It but you can't gel In j
touch with any eye witnesses.
In Twin Falls there is a man
by the name of Pringle. He is
a modern money shark. He was
foreclosing on a farm for which
the farmer had paid $17,904) but
on which he could not pay the
taxes this year.
Thl« man, Pringle, took a ride
to where there was a new suit
of tar and feathers, which he re
ceived. Then he proceeded to
the Hainson bridge which spans
the Snake river. The bridge is
about 500 feet above the water.
He was going to dive off the
bridge.
The only facts known without
a shadow of doubt fa that fore
closure proceeding» have been
withdrawn.
are put off with empty phrases.
The Red Cross ads when it is
forced to. Montana farmers Have
leu dned this.
TAR-FEATHERS
FOR BANKER IN
IDAHO RUMORED
(A BUHL FARMER)
The Producers New» fa your
paper, renew your subscription
FARM PRICES FALL TO NEW LOW
LEVEL: 51 PER CENT OF PREWAR
Department of Agriculture Admits Drop in Hog Prices
Is Due to Inability of Consumers to purchase;
Result of Wage Cuts and Unemployment
Farm prices reached a new low
point on Jan. 16 when the index
of the Department of Agriculture
fell to 61 per cent, of the pre-war
level. One year ago, on Jan. 16,
1982, the price level was at 63 per
cent of pre-war.
From Dec. 15 eggs took a larg
er than seasonal drop, prices of
hay, hogs, cattle and calves went
down to new reoord levels in the
23 year statistical record of the
Department of Agriculture.
HOGS ONE THIRD LES*S
Hog» were bringing an average
farm price of $2.68 per hundred on
Jan. 16, or 29 per cent less than on
January 16, 1982. This drop of
nearly one-third is due, the de
1
HOOVER'S R. F. C. RELIEF
Bill Murray and Hoover have
been promising us some help ever
since November through Hoover's
R. P. C. In December a few men
worked the road four days for
$2.40 a day, and then had to wait
30 days f«r their little bit of pay
while their families were hungry
and without shoes. They told us
that in January every one in the
county would get to work, but
when Jan. came they put another
little group of men to work for
five days at $2 a day and then
said we would have to wait until
after Feb. 1 before any more work
could be done.
The last crew of men are »till
waiting for Bill Murray to Mild
them their check*.
10PEN BY MAGIC
I
Postmaster, Minister and
Judge Refuse to Hear
Needs of Farmers
more is needed
Minister Calls Sheriff and
Deputy to Beat Fanners'
Wives
"It opened by magic 1" said one
of the farmers of Sheridan coun
ty, Montana, when the door of
the Red Cross store room at Plen
tywood swung open and two hun
dred needy white and Indian farm
ers helped themselves to the un
derwear which had been stored
there for several weeks.
But it wasn't magic. It was
because the farmers came togeth
er in a body and decided that if
the chairman and the custodian of
the Red Cross refused to hand out
the goods that they were so badly
in need of, they would take It
Gathering at the Farmer-I*abor
Temple in Plentywood, the farm
ers with their wives and children
had answered £he call of the Un
ited Farmers league for a two
day meeting February 8 and 4 to
take up the burning question of
relief. Many came 85 miles —
from the farthest reaches <A the
county—although it was 20 be
low zero when they started out.
KEEP GOODS LOCKED UP
These farmers were shivering
from the cold while the underwear
they needed was locked up in a
storeroom! Many had applied foi
the goods previously but they had
always been told that it would be
given out later.
Enraged at this delay the farm
ers applied to the chairman of
the Red Cross, Judge S. E. Paul,
for the goods. Ignoring their des
perate plight, he refuted to au
thorize the distribution of the
goods. The farmers then decided
to march to the Red Cross office
and demand that the good» be
given out.
(Continued on ra»e Two)
j partment of agriculture admit», to
« the reduced consumer demand,
This "consumer demand" is the
amount of pork that the working
class in the cities can buy and not
the amount they would eat if they
could.
Sheep were selling at $2.10 per
100 pound* in local faim markets
on January 16, and lambs at $4.99
per hundred pounds. The price of
sheep was about 16 per cent, un
der that of a year ago, and of
lambs about 8 per cent under the
price on January 16, 1982.
WHEAT DOWN ONE-FOURTH
IN JAN.
Wheat was bringing farmers an
average of 82 9 cents a bushel on
Jan. 15, 1982, about 25 per cent
than the price on Jan. 16,
1932.
Com was yielding farmers 19.1
cents per bushel on January 16 or
about 43 per cent less than tn
January a year ago.
Flax reached 90.8 cents per bu.
at local farm markets in mid-Jan
uary, a price that was about 22
per cent less than that on January
16 last year.
Cotton was selling at an aver
age of 6.6 cents per pound at
farms on January 16, at about th®
same level as on January 16 last
Y 6 ® 1 ' 1
January 16, 1932.
Eggs were selling at «n average
farm price of 21.4 cents a dozen In.
mid-January, and although that
! figure represented a drop of about
24 per cent from December 16, the
pr j ce on January 16 was 24 per
higher than on the same dat® fa
Potatoes were bringing farmers
37.4 cents a bushel on January 16.
about 21 per cent less than on
or
1932

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