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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, February 24, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, Image 2

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
Published weekly at Plentywood, Montana, by
The Peoples Publishing Company, Inc.
Official Organ of the
UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
Official paper of the City of Plentywood, Montana
Subscription Rates:
National or County Edition—In the
United States: per year, $2; six months, $1; three months,
60 cents. Foreign per year $2.60; ax months, $1.26; three
months, 60 cents.
& Ti
Advertising Rates furnished upon application.
ERIK BERT, Editor
RUTH BERT, Associate Editor
CHARLES E. TAYLOR, Managing Editor
HANS RASMUSSEN, Business Manager
Friday, February 24, 1933
BRING OUR PROGRAM TO THE
AMERICAN FARMERS
During the past four weeks we have published the
Draft Program of the United Farmers League, "The Mili
tant Program of American Farmers." This program has
been published bjr decision of the Organizational Confer
ence of the U, F. L. which was held in Washington, D. C.
Dec. 10.
It is not the final Program, it is published as a draft.
This has been done in order to make it possible for all
farmers, members of the United Farmers League and
others, to take part in the final shaping of the Program,
We now open the columns of the Producers News for
discussion on the Program and By-laws.
This discussion will probably last until the next na
tional conference or convention of the United Farmers
League. On the basis of the discussion the Executive
Council will present to this convention or conference, a
final draft for amendment and adoption.
In order that the Executive Council have the bene
fit of our views we must all participate in the discussion
and get as many of our neighbors to do so as well. Each
local of the United Farmers
League
sion meetings on the program, inviting not only mem
bers of the League but all the farmers in the commun
ity to take part.
We plan a widespread distribution of the Draft Pro
gram. It will be issued in a five cent pamphlet form in a
few weeks time.
Each of
Draft Program.
has three tasks in connection with the
us
1. Participate in the discussion ourselves.
2. Read the program over with our neighbors,
and get them to take part in discussing it. Each
United Farmers League to hold discussions for all
farmers: in the community.
3. Spread the Draft Program in pamphlet form
to every farmer in the community.
In this way we will not only help to make the
gram, The Program of American Farmers,
build the United Farmers League in doing it.
pro
but will
* »
NORTH DAKOTA FARMERS UNION
AND HOLIDAY LEADERS ATTEMPT
TO DISRUPT STATE CONFERENCE
(Continued from page One)
Relief meeting, who had been se
lected by the faker leadership to
put some semblance of decency on
meeting.
Burdick, the lawyer farm "leader"
took his feet roaring like a mad
bull charging a matador, with his
eyes bulging and his lips quiver
ing, bellowel that the mass meet
ing had heard of
the face of the
mass
and his outfit. He continued by
saying that the actual dirt farm
ers, who have been accorded the
privilege of the floor several times
and who have done nr thing dur
ing the ma®s meeting but disturb i
it with their attacks and by dis
tribution. of circulars and leaflets
attacking the "farm leaders" of
the state and the good faith of
the mas® meeting, and that he
would not listen to him anymore.
An organized gang of relatives j
of the high salaried "farm lead-1
ers' aixd politicians and their
henchmen, planted for the pur
pose, booed Ingerson and cried
"throw him out" but a few real
farmers in the crowd were ®ilent.
As soon as Burdick the faker, had
subsided, purple with rage, chair
man Walker without motioïi de
clared the ma®s meeting ad
journed.
Angry and disillusioned farmers
Holiday and Farmers Union mem
bers in good standing, had gotten
their first insight into the duplic
ity and fakery of the leaders to
whom they are paying more in
salary each year to lead and eave
them than the gross receipts from
a whole township of whcatland.
As things now stand it looks as if
Charlie Talbot had better be get
ting a job from the democratic
administration for it is safe to
predict that as a result of this
mass meeting he will not be re
elected to his $6,000 job.
Ashbel Ingerson, the Secretary
of the Call Committee for the
Farmers State Reiief Conference,
! had caused to be mimeographed
! an<i distributed at the convention
a circular charging that Talbot
an d Burdick had called the mass
relief meeting two days before the
scheduled date for the convening
! the State Relief conference for
the vicious purpose of liquidating
the rank and file conference. He
also distributed a circular, and
open, letter to John Walz,
fakers wild and they showed thei» -
spleen on several occassions dur
ing the two days of the mass
meeting,
printed story of the Producer®
News, the official organ of the
United Farmers League, to all
those who attended the mass meet
ing. These circulars drove the
The maes meeting was called to
order Sunday afternoon at 2 o'
clock by "Dad" Walker^ who had
been appointed by the "leaders"
to act as chairman. There was no
election. The leaders did u»ot think
lhat a secretary was necessary.
About 400 were present, maybe a
hundred fanners who had come in
from scattered points in the state
in response to the cab, eent out
by Talbot and Burdick, while the
lest were members of the legisla
ture and visitors. The number of
farmers increased a few on Mon
day while some of the Sunday
delegates went home.
A whole string of functionaries
of the St. Paul business activities
came over for the mass meeting.
A. W. Ricker, editor of the Farm
ers Union Herald, Crool, grain
buyer, and several others.
Townley did not come as had
been advertised, but wired his re
gret® aftd greetings, telling the
farmers "to fight the banker® and
loan sharks like hell, pay no
debts, pay no taxes, stop evictions,
and raise halL" Townley who had
been hired by the farm leader
fakers to come to Bismarck and
help bust the raiik and file Farm
ers State Relief Conference thot
Farmers Union Terminal Is Renamed
FARM MORATORIUM I
BY INSURANCE CO.S
IN GEORGIA AGREED
The Georgia Real Estate Loan
Association, an organization of 16
of the largest lifç ,insurancexom
panics doing business in the state,
farm mo^a^es^ep^ere the
property has been abandoned. The
companies agreeing to the mora
torium hold about 85 per cent of
the farm mortgages. These will
be renewed if the farmer agrees
to remain on the property.
This step was taken in, order to
prevent the development of Sears
and Roebuck sales in Georgia,
such as have taken place in other
parts of the country.
RAIL Y1H ARCH 4
TO WIN RELIEF
Demand Unemployment
Insurance for Jobless
Workers
Utr.der the leadership of the Un
employed Councils, workers all
over the country will demonstrate
on March 4 for unemployment and
social insurance.
Already woikers have won sub
stantial gains in their struggles
to force relief. In Chicago they
forced authorities to withdraw the
In St.
13,000 families that had
been put off the relief list were
reinstated. The national and the
state hunger marches have also
compelled authorities tj make
more and more concessions to the
unemployed.
NATIONWIDE STRUGGLE
However, hunger gro'ws and the
struggle deepens. The Unem
ployed Councils call for the unity
of the worker® to make March 4
a success. Huge demonstrations
are expected in every city in the
country to demand immediate fed
50 per cent relief cut.
Louis,
eral relief an dunemployment in
surance.
CALL NATIONAL CON.
FERENCE
On March 5, the Unemployed
Councils are calling a national con
ference in Washington, D. C., to
which elected representatives of
the rank and file of all unem
ployed organization® are invited.
The conference will work out
joint demands and elect a delega
tion to prêtent them to Roosevelt
on March 6.
200 DELEGATES
MEET IN PIERRE
Lewis Benzley, president of the
United Farmers Protective As®)
ciation of Pennsylvania, and Lem
Harris, executive secretary of the
Farmers National Committee for
action were enthusiastically
ceived.
(Continued from Front Page)
re
PROGRAM ADOPTED
The program adopted included:
Cash relief for ruined farm
ers.
No» evictions and foreclosures.
Cancellation of back taxes,
feed and seed loans, and delin
quent interest.
No deficiency judgment®.
Abolition of state militia.
Production credit without col
lateral, for impoverished farm
ers.
„ , „
Reduction of auto and truck
license fee«
! ,
Resolutions were parsed con
demring imperialist war, for re
lease of Tom Mooney, and support
of the unemployed demands for
cash relief.
The demand® were presneted to
the legislature after a marcs, to
the state house. "Solidarity" was
sung in the legislative hlals by
the farmers as they filed in.
The only thing that the legisla
ture promised the farmers was
"sympathy".
A permanent organization was
set up in the form of a state com
mittee for action. Affiliation of.
tlus state committee with the Na
. °. mml ee r cri°n was
completed. j
Every delegate pledged himself :
to permit no evictions or fore- i
closures of any kind to take place i
in. South Dakota. The conference i
then adjourned. i
;
better of the idea and staid at
home, tho he needed the money
badly. The president of the Min
nesota Farmers Union also de
clined to come to North Dakota it
is reported when he learned what
Talbot and Burdick intended to
use him for.
Milo Reno, tho advertised as a
drawing card, did not put in an
appearance and it was later inti
mated about °n the street that his
and some other names had been
used as bait to lure the farmers
in 90 as to make a showing at
the Mass convention.
renew
YOUR
SUBSCRIPTION
LAST RELIC OF FARMER CONTROL, NAME OF
COMPANY, PASSES TO FARM
BOARD
fRY C* I \
' r l 10
. Avpndale, Mont., Feb. 12.—
t ^ at istbave a pretty little piece of paper t
a share in the Farmers Union Terminal Association,
rectlv controlled by Hoover's Farm Board,
a stockholder,
hat says 1 own
Under date of Jan. 20, 1933, the board of directors
of the Farmers Union Terminal Association issued a
circular letter to the stockholders asking us to vote YES
for a cliange in the Articles of Incorporation of the Ter
minal Assn., so that the Association would be more di
In this letter appears the following bright statement.
If legislative plans now pending in Congress mature,
« •
agriculture will be re-established, and the buying power
of the farmers restored. There is every reason to believe
that the program now pending in Congress will be en
acted into law. Ihe enactment of this program into law
will re-establish agriculture and end the depression.
What is it in Washington, that these "gentlemen"
can so emphatically say is going to end the "depression?
Can these "gentlemen" of the Farmers Union ex
plain how they reconcile such tripe with the assertions
that the Farmers Union is not in politics?
♦ *
* *
Those signing this letter are such as C. C. Talbott,
D. L. O'Connor, W. J. Maddock, Lieut. Gov. O. H. Ol
son, etc.
These "leaders" of the feed trough type are surely
busy trying to cool off thn farmers i
s in their fights against
foreclosures, evictions, etc. and in their strike for higher
prices. ' »
These tactics should be thoroughly exposed The
farmers Union is surely a bulwark of capitalism, and
these misleaders are doing their utmost to keep us farm
ers trusting in the feed bag politicians in Washingt
on.
300 DELEGATES FROM FORTY
COUNTIES MEET IN UNCOLN
t »
(Continued from page One)
many of whom were entirely sym
pathetic. And no one would have
dared to heckle that determined
army of farmers and workers.
Christen® en, Lux and others spoke
from the bottom steps. Lux
reached the high point when he
declared that, regardless of the ac
tion taken by the legislators, the
farmers would cotntinue their ac
tive policy of keeping the produc
ers on the land,
over fed international banker® is
big enough, strolng enough to whip
us," he said.
No bunch of
READY TO FIGHT
Christensen said that he knew
any man that was a man would
gladly die fighting rather than go
passively to the poor house and
starvation. Again he stated "This
is a peaceful revolution. If this
doe® not work, all those standing
1 our wa y wil1 ^ held respotti
siMe."
Farmers came to the Conference
to draw up a fighting program
against evictions, for a morator
ium on debts, against the profits
of middlemen, and for certain defi
nite demands like the abolition of
the state militia and its funds to
be used for public schools. With
almost no success the lobbyists
and enemies attempted to coinfuse
the farmers with every kind cf
fake bill from inflation to compli
cated refinancing. Not only were
their bills rejected but the creden
tials of those who had slipped by
the gate were challenged, and they
were ejected by vote of the farm
ers.
500 UNEMPLOYED ALSO
1 MARCH
On the second day of the Con
I ferer.™ a non _ . "
1 ferei T 4 »°0° fanners came in to
-1 join the march on the capital. The
farmers had passed to their con
ference resolutions of
with the city writers add, when
they formed their ranks to march
to the capitol, 600 unemployed
workers of the Unemployed Coun
cil joined up and paraded arm in
arm with the farmers thru main
street® of Lincoln. Their banners
along with the farmers' banners
were all taken into the capitol
and placed before the speakers
rostrum, while the farmers de
mands were being read.
The House and Senate met in
joint session to hear the demands,
w 1 e the farmers crowded bal
conies and aisles. When the farm
er spokesman reached the part of
the preamble "We declare our
selves disgusted and in revolt as
against the "leadership" of bank
era and other business men," the
crowds of farmer® and workers in
the hall of the legislature burst
into a loud cheer,
BOL) P ARMENTER
Ha\mg failed to mislead the
fanners of the convention, the
desperate gang 0 f agents attempt
ed to substitute in the pree s a
weak and submissive program for
the fighting demands of the farm
t T l' iA eut Govem#r P®nnit
ted H. C. Parmenter, an insurance
man, to read this eubmissive pro
gram which had been drawn up
without consulting with the farm
ers. His appearance to read this
program was greeted by loud boos,
hisse® and cat calls from the farm
ers who were enraged at this at
tempt to confuse their demands.
. , , . , ,
After the delegates had got the
hearing, maïiy of the farmers left
town immediately. But many oth
er® stayed on to arrange for fur
ther organization. They left with
a sense of the power they have.
They discovered, too, those that
did not already know, that the cap
italist is not on their side. They
could read for themselve® and un
derstand the attacks made by the
"Journal
"Omaha World-Herald,
new thing for the farmers to be
attacked by the "Red-scare" pro
gram, a thing that city workers
have long been accustomed to.
of Uncoln and the
It is a
ILLINOIS GOV. ASKS
FARMERS BE QUIET
Real Relief on Debts Will
Come Only Thru
Cancellation
In order to avert the sharp
struggles that the farmers to. the
various parts of the oouutry have
put up against foreclosures and
evictions from spreading to Illi
nois, Governor Homer, on Feb. 4,
iseued a statement asking the
mortgage holders to be "leinient."
asked the mortgage holders
to use "the utmost forbearance in
foreclosures on mortgages on the
farms, homes and chattels when
the farmer or home owner i® in
such desperate financial circum
stances that he is actually unable
to pay."
He
AVOIDS REAL ACTION
.
The governor used this means to
id tak j ng real which
» real action wmen
"I"" prev "' '»«closur« a " d
evlctl0ns > wlu ch he ®aid neither he
«V» legislates could do be
ca ® se * w * uld im P air 0r invah '
date contracts.
Th® governor wants to make the
farmers believe that conditions are
going to get better.
"Thfe U proposed as tempo
rary relief only and until ecu
dirions change for the better,"
the governor said.
What the farmers want is not
temporary relief but permanent
relief. Onlv cancellation of debts
wWc h the "impoverished farmers
owe will give them some measure
-,„1 re ii e f

THF. SC AND AL Or
"EASTERN RELIEF'
Scandaelous details have now
been revealed concerning the dis
tribution of the so-called "Eastern
Relief," the government subsidy
f 0r the rich farmers to the east
eTT1 areas of Germ an v. It is now
revealed that the eastern relief in
fact was a form in which to pre
gent the rich fanners with htm
dreds 0 f thousands of Marks pci
mfm to do what they like with
»rheorcttcallv the ®ums granted
to have been u®ed to dear
^ property in the eastern areas
^ debts and mortgages and to
tidc the estates over the crisis. It
has now been revealed that in fact
sum® were used to purchase
fondons private motor cars, to
fo du1 g e in expensive journeys to
the Riviera, etc. etc. The leader
0 f the eastern fanners, Oldenbttrg
Januschau received 621,000 Marks
"COOPERATION" OF
FARMERS WITH BIG
BANKS IS ADVISED
P. H. Daniel, president of the
Federal Laînd Bank of Columbia,
not think
iftdrm 3 on
farm loans is advisable. His views
were presented by Harry D. Reed,
counsel for the Bank, at a confer
ence of mortgage holders on Feb.
14, called by Governoi Ibra C.
Blackwood.
In order to divert the farmers
from a demand for a general mora
coriura or cancellation of their
debts, Daniel suggested a "full
cooperation between the borrower
and the lender."
This is the scheme that is being
spread by the politicians thruout
iuth Çaro
u 1
era
moi
the country and has been orga
nized in State Board of Concilia
tion in Nebraska.
The farmers want an end of
eviction® and foreclosures not full
"cooperation
They have been bled white by
that.
with the banks.
MAKE JOBLESS
FARM (»ACRES
Tell Them to go "Back to
Land" Altho Farmers on
Land Can't Make Living
(BY ROBERT WARREN)
Beaumont, Texa®.—"Back tc the
This fake cure for unem
Land!
ployment is being peddled by local
Young Men's Business League and
Chamber of Commerce in an ef
fort both u) iclievc its members
from contributing to help tne un
employed and to prevent possible
organization cx the unemployed
FORCED LABOR ON
LAND
Jobless wotktr.- of thi® .uty art
beirg consciptec; to ev.Juie fur
thei misery ir, h t malaria-infest
ed swamplands of Soutn Texas
The city 1 already come into
possession »'f a (>C acre tract where
the unerr.pl > ,co are sert to work
for a .scanty amount «-f groceries.
Now it is oronos •! to get rid of
these workers altogether by setnd
ir.g them to '.he farms permahent
iy.
Of course, the local magnates
are not concert!ed with the welfare
of the Jefferson county farmers,
whose products will become even
less valuable with the introduction
of these competing producers
Farm products in this region bring
such a low price now that farmers
are bartering their vegetables and
produce at the dime store, in ex
change for merchandise. Tf the
farmers cannot make a living on
the farms, how can inexperienced
worker®? The farmers and work
ers of Jefferson county , must
ganize for mutual self-protection.
or
as. his ehare of the "relief". With
this sum, or a part of it he pur
chased a new estate, probably in
the hope that at the distribution of
the next "relief" he would receive
a double share. The Count of
Sautma wh „ also r eiy
sum purchascd an £legant priva g te
car.
BUYS CAR WITH "RELIEF
MONEY"
The Prince of Scboen burg used
Ms share of the boodle to
gsnize expensive hunting sport for
Ms numerous friends. The revela
tions threaten to develop into a
scan dal on a giant scale and the
^ 0vernmen t is doing its utmost to
hush up the affair and prevent an
official inquiry. At the same time
the condition of the poor peasants
is really terrible, but there is lit
or
flp tv? r_, ,,
" e or nothing for them and noth
mg for the millions of hungry
, .
the &Sn® Hetorlift Heto.
« ^rm^ HemnÄ Heine
un
re
Jteked ^.o has much reemves
little" AM who has »th w J5 ÏÎ
. . , Jf, , g t
elf „ with AV P rPntîn d -
nowad ' those who
anl tboi who hive nothkJ
rallying to the revolutionarv muted
front y
!
. ___ __
IvlTAKJ SHIRTS SEE
! LIBERTY PARTY AS
j
1

are
POLITICAL ALLY
The fascist outfit, known, as the
Khaki Shirts of America, who
! claim to have six million members
1 (and may have six thousand), and
j who hope to imitate Muaeolini's
Black Shirts or Hitler's murderous
Brown Shirt hordes, have endorsed
Harvey and the Liberty
P 31 ^
^ a letter dated Jan. 27 written
*° Mr. Harvey, a "Corps Comman
der" in Illinois, writes, "If we
be °* service to yon at any « me
P lease let « know—for after read
in g your paper you can depend
u P°n our full cooperation at all
times."
° tber rear-admirals, etc. of the
Khaki Shirts are ordering copies
Coin's books and his papers,
Harvey has been rampaging
»round the money powers. Bird®
of a ^ ock together
and ^ be Khaki Shirts know Just
wbpre Coi " Harvey's "radical"
Phrases lead—into their fasdst
can
i "»P*
Producers News—$2
per year
Doings of the
Advance Guard
Now we are going to put on a real drive for the
paper. Starting March I we are going to give a prize
each month to the one who gets us the most subs.
We are not going to give away any enclosed cars.
But, each month we will give away to the winner a book,.
Slid its a good one, one-you will appreciate .and want to
read.
The price of the book is $2.30. It is written by John
L. Spivak and is called "Georgia Nigger." It is a stirrfng
and interesting novel, telling facts about how the people
in the south are treated today, after they were supposed
to be freed from slavery.
The one who gets us the most subs during the month
will get this book. If the winner already has this book
and would rather have another one, we will get one not
costing over the $2.30 for him. Just tell us which
you want. - c
one
In order to get this down Uni
form we will figure a sub otn. the
25-cent base. The same credit
will be given to the person send
ing in a year sub ($2.00) a® to the
one who sends us eight 25 cent
subs. The biggest humber of the
yearly subs sent in during the
month is what count®.
Now, let Us go to it and see
who will get the prize for March.
It is going to be quite an inter
esting race and quite an honor to
be the winner. Thru the Advance
Guard you can keep track of it
right along. Let us all start out
with the intention of being the
Winner.
j
Say, folks, be sure and send in
your bundle orders here in time,
otherwi«e we are not always able
to fill your orders. We print
quite a few extras but sometimes
we run out.
DOINGS OF LAST WEEK
United Co-operative of Eben
Junction, Mich., wants some back
copies.
BROKE AND FEEL
DIFFERENT
?5opha Gillespie, Port Angeles,
Wash., subecribes for sjx months
and pays for a bundle to he sent.
"Most folks aroumd here have been
so sure they were "patriotic" but
now two of our three banks went
broke the last week in January, so
now they feel different," he eays.
The U. F. L. of Twin Falls,
Idaho, got 100 papers and wants
200 more. They send $3.
THINKS PAPER IS
GREAT
Marvin Dutton, Stroll,. S. D.,
renews for another six months.
"I think the paper is great," he
writes.
Jim Flower, our National Sec
retary, sends Us five sub®.
Nick Larson, Brush Prairie,
Wash., orders a receipt book and
sample copies.
Leonard Vedder, Gibbs, Idaho,
eends ug tWo six month subs.
Frank Walters, Sioux City, la.,
orders another 100 copies of the
paper.
From Casper, Wyo., we get an
order for 100 copies.
W. E. Clement, Pierce county,
Wash., sends a dollar and or
ders a dollars* worth of papers
sent each week. "We have
makiy good workers and we are
going after more," he says.
Robert Kirmo, Ludden, N Oak.
sends us three more subs.
Claus Carlson, Santa Cruz, Cal,
sends a dollar for a bundle cf
papers for distribution.
INTEREST IS AWAKENING
John Wustehberg, Chico», Calif,
pays for bundles. 'The interest
in the Producers News is awak
ening. The near future we will
have some subscribers for you,
he writes.
Roy Miller, Frederick, S. Dak.,
ie here again with another two
subs.
DON'T WANT TC BE WITH
OUT PAPER
Elmer Johnson, Palermo, N.
Dak., says he likes the paper
very much and dori't want to be
s without it. He sends a dollar
for renewal.
Julius Walstad, Claire City, S.
*
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m
m
North Dakota Farmers
tf
i*]
*
IZI
The Producers News
will have a special reporter at the
F armers Relief Conference
at Bismarck
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Subscribe at once and keep yourself posted
what is going on at your capitol during the
Conference.
Subscription: One year -2; eix months, $1; three months
60 cents; six weeks, 26 cents.
Ameiftit
on
m
*
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*
$....
*
Name .
m
Post Office .
m
State .
*
S*S©SiBiS^
Dak., sends a six month ®ub.
had a good meeting in Siaseton
court house yesterday," he says.
H. Larson, Menno, S. Dak.,
eefrids two more subs.
WANTS TO LEARN MORE
Geo». J. Seifert, Mt, Vernon,
In<L, subscribes and says. M 1
want to leant more about this
farmers organization.
John Pahl, Cromwell, Minn.,
news for six months.
Workers Center, Tacoma, Wash,
pays for bundles received.
RESENT LOSING OUT
Willi» Hibner of Twin Falls,
county Idaho sends i'n four more
subs.
among our farmers when we
hear of Machine companies re
possessing machines and leading
the farmer's horses and cows
away" he writes.
Emil Falk, Glencoe, Minn., sends
a dollar for sample copies to be
sent to the farmers.
^ WILL GO OVER BIG
Frank Arvola, Hancock, Mich.,
sends one sub. "Once we get the
Producers News ïnto this lo
cality we can be sure it will go
over big," he writes.
We
re
Resentment grows n*w
Fred Ruchar, Union Grove, N.
Y., renews for another year.
A farmer of Frakiklin Co., Pa.,
say® he enjoys the paper very
much. He sends a renewal and
one sub.
Joseph Standoitis, Custer, Mich
renews for another six months.
"It is a real farmers paper," he
says.
CANT WAIT FOR NEXT
ONE
Archie Allikas, Gleason, Wia,
want s a receipt book. Tt sure
is a good paper. I caln't hardly
wait for the next weekly copy."
Wm. Ferguson, Seattle, Wash,
wants his bundle order doubled.
He sends us one dollar.
LETTING OTHERS IN ON IT
D. K. Georgieff, Chilco, Idaho,
subscribes and sends two more
subs. "We eh joy your paper and
are sending ours to neighbors
and friends as soon as we read
them," he writes.
Miss Hilma Maki, Sandstone.
Minn., sends in a renewal. "Many
farmers leaki their Producers
News to their neighbors so they
cain read it," she says.
FARMERS COME FOR PAPER
Nick Vukelich, Spokane, Wash,
sends money for bundles received
and sold. "Fanners come to me
for the Producers News and in
formation how to start organiza
tions," he says.
Niel J. Ness, Carbert, Mont.,
subscribes.
Hans Calleen, Uly, S. Dak.,
sends for sample copies.
Olaf Pary, New York Mill, Minn,
renews for ottie year.
August Jacobson, N. Y. Mills,
Minn., ®ends in two renewals.
....Edwin Pfützen reu ter, Hecla, S.
Dak., says. "Shoot me a copy as
soon as possible, can't get along
without it."
Hang A, Olson. Weetby, Mont.,
renews.
H. Rude, Plentywotod, Mont.,
subscribes.
Arthur Rehner, Antelope, Mont,
renews.
Andrew Anderson and John A.
Nelson Outlook, Mont., renew.

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