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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, April 28, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, Image 4

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Tnlrl In Rviaf
IUtU 111 UIlel
Production of Steel Rails to
1877 Level
Production of steel rails in the United States
during 1932 totaled 402,566 tons, against 1,157,751
tons in 1931 and 1,873,233 tors in 1930, according
to the American Iron and Steel Institute. This
was the smallest amount since 1877- over half a
century.
U. S. Steel Corp. Backs
Roosevelt
Hoboken, New Jersey, April 17.—A stock
holder got up today at the annual meeting of the
United States Steel Coip. and asked that the
stockholders gc on record supporting the
veil administration. 'Tm glad to .offer
resolution.
s ucil a
said Baylor, chairma of the company.
We should rally under this banner 'without re
gam lo party, t-: save this country o. curs. Vve
have always supported the Preside'-1 of our coun
iwOwSO*
<(
Bankers to Demand Cuts in Relief
A "steering committee" of Wail Street bank
ers has been r-ppo!' tec t: deal with New Ycrk
City on the question of refinancing the city bonds
which become due shortly. The bankers will try
to foice through sharp cuts in relief and higher
transit fares, in return for refinancing the city's
obligations.
New Airship for War
Akron, Ohio, April 21. — The M,acon, sister
i-hip of the Akron which crashed recently made
her maiden flight today. The ship cost nearly $2,
500,000 and is part of the American preparations
for the next imperialist war.
Mooney Retrial Is Won
San Francisco.—A partial but impoitant vic
• ory in the mass pressure campaign fer Tom
Mooney's release vva s gained by the workers when
Judge Louis Ward of the Superior Court deried
arguments for the dismissal of the new Mooney
trial on April 26.
Mooney Calls for May Day
Demonstrations
San Quentin, Calif.—A call to all workers to
join ranks in May Day demonstrations as part of
the struggles to free him from prison has been
issued by Tom Mooney. Mooney connects his
freedom with the daily struggles of the working
class agairst unemployment, hunger, and impend
ing wtar by declaring that "to free me now would
give the whole working class new heart
He urges workers to elect delegates to the
Free Tom Mooney Congress in Chicago, April 30
to May 2. The delegates will take part as a body
in the Chicago May Day parade.
• '
Mooney Honorary Chairman of
Scottsboro Conference
New York.—Tc-m Mooney was elected hon
orary chairman of the united front conference
called by the ScotLborc Unity Defense Commit
tee here April 16 to plan a mass protest march on
Washington to demjand the release of the nine
Scottsboro Negro boys.
At the same conference, Mrs. Janio Patter
son, mother of Heywood Patterson, framed to a
death sentence in the Decatur, Alabama court,
wag elected delegates to the Free Tom Mooney
Congress ir Chicago, April 30 to May 2.
World Trade Down 63 Per Cent
in Three Years
According to figures of the National Indus
trial Conference Board, the foreign trade of 24
countries, which between them account for 80 per
cer t of the world's total foeign trade, shows a de
cline of 32.8 billion dollars, or 62.1 per cent from
1929 to 1932.
Middle Class Home Owners Fight
Seveijal bundled middle class persons living
in Sunnyside Gardens, Long Island, New York,
have gone or. strike in order to get a reduction
ir their mortgage debt. "Sink or swim, we will
all stick together" is their sloga'. The banks
which bold the mortgages on the houses in the
-section have threatened the leaders of the move
men! witli eviction. Se\onty*five per cent of tlie
owners are practically destitute.
Disease Affects Unemployed
Sickness is ulnusu^ally prevalent amor g the
300,000 families on the public relief rolls in the
state. Thus admission is contained in a repor-t
made by the New York State Emergency Relief
Administration to the State Department of
Health.
Destitution Among Jobless
Now York.—Nearly everyone cf the 120,000
families receiving relief m New \ork i s m urgent
need of clothing, according to the Welfare Coun
cil. The total of unemployed and members of
their families who have bought no new clothing
for the past two or three years is 900,000.
► Police Club Unpaid Chicago
Teachers
Chicago, April 26.—Several women teachers
were injured today when police clubbed them for
demonstrating for their pay before the First Na
tional Bank. Other teachers were clubber! earlier
in the day before tho Chicago Title and Trust com
pany offices. The teachers used school books iin
an attempt to defend themselves. Several police
men had their uniforms torn.
Silver Mine Owners Cash in on
Inflation
Washington, April 26.—By a vote of 41 to 26
the Senate today passed the Wheeler-King amend
mt! t to the inflation bill.
The amendment pro
vides that the President can coin silver at a ratio
to be fixed by him. By this amendment the silver
mine owner? are getting a charce to participate
in the benefits of the inflation measurt.
Canada off Gold Standard
Ottawa, Ontario, April 25.—Canada has
halted redemption of dominion notes in gold,
according to Minister of Finance Rhodes. Canada
is now off the standard also. This i» one of the
first effects of the suspension of th» gold staki
ùztù V th-i United States.
tf
Dakota farmers brave storm
TO ATTEND MEETING ON RELIEF
*
CHAIRMAN OF RELIEF OUTFIT TELLS DEST1
TUTE FARMERS THEY ARE LUCKY 1
TO EAT SOMETIMES
j
j
(BY A. S.) :
Mir/ot, N. D., April 6.—About
1100 farmers braved a snow storm :
to attend the Mountrail county re- j
1 lief meeting which was held in the
courthouse at Stanley on April 5.
I The discussicin of the relief situa- |
tion brought out clearly that the
( ta?k of the appointed County
'Emergency Relief Committee '
! not to see that those who need
,
j irei would be assured of getting it
; but Js to discourage as many as
possible from applying for relief,
and giving out as little as possible
to those who applied and in many |
| cases turning them down alto
; gether.
IS
ie
CHAIRMAN QUESTIONED
j It wag decided to ask the Chair
1 man of the County Relief Com
mittee to come to the meeting and
explain what the results were
the resolution- that had been ;
adopted at a previous meeting a k
ing for $12,0C0 more for March
of the R. F. C. funds which are
available for relief purposes. 1
chairman started out by
telling the fanners how heartily ;
he sympathized with them. In or- j
der to cover his owtn actions in not
getting relief he said' that the j
j regulations for th e handling of re
lief had been made by the federal
government and that all his com- ■
mittee could do was to follow the i
rules.
Tie
FORTUNATE FARMERS? |
He told 1 the farmers how for- ;
tulnate they 'were since they could
butcher a calf once in a while, and
still had some flour and could
i
Plan Milk Board to
Crush Ohio Farmers
Columbus, Ohio.—A bill has been
introduced in the Ohio legislature
as part of the countrywiue at
tempt on the part of th e milk
trust to crash the developing mili
tancy among the dairy farmers.
The capitalist press, in re
porting the bill, goes out of
its way to prove that the bill
is a "conservative," that is* a
reactionary measure and 1 not
The bill
a radical proposal,
was drafted upon recommenda
tion s of Ward-headed conserva
tive people (the milk trust
agents—Editor), appointed to
study the question by Gover
nor George White, a conserva
tive, who frowns upon all the
radical activities."
I
BANKER HEADS COMMITTEE
White's committee was headed,
appropriately enough for the milk
trust, by C. H. Burk, a Huron
county banker.
The committee tries to create
an excuse for the dictatorial pow
ers included in the bill by declar
ing "the production,
distribution aixi
this State ... to be a business
charged with public interest.
DICTATORSHIP POWERS
The bill proposes the estab
lishment of a milk ccmmis
processing,
sale of milk in
Why Do We Need a United Farmers Lea
ue National Office?
LEAGUE ORGANIZER IN WASHINGTON DK
CUSSES QUESTIONS RAISED BY
PYIT/^I m\ /P *
tAlXUllVti wUNCIL
(BY WILLIAM FERGUSON)
I have been aJn organizer of
workers at one time or another
and in various organizations of a
class conscious nature for almost
30 years. I have noticed in that
j time that we invariably make two
i ir three mistakes. I will call at
j tention to the most glaring of the
I mistakes that I have noticed.
First, wo times pa.-t
lheer g^ded mostly on the down
grade by high sa i ar i e d leadership,
i Another fault has been to
extent hero worship and depend
ence oîn a few leaders. These hav e
at the start beeîn well intenticned,
but due to the fact that they usu
ally are able to express themselves
a little above the average, they j
dominate the organization to
greater or less degree.
some
. ,
■■ This 13,
of course, due to the neglect and
indifference of the rank and file.
Another thing is our too heavy and
unnecessary methods which call
for more actual expense than is
warranted at any time and more
unwarranted no wthan at any time
in th history of the farmers or
workers movements.
a :
The next, bad fault is to con
tiriually harp about the need ol
funds and the perpetual call
members for money. At this time
it is an extremely dangerous atti
tude to take and one which will
cause more of a set back than
other thing.
Now I want to comment on each
of these things in tum, »o I will
start at, the bottom.
on
any
SAVES POSTAGE
In the matter of application
cards, I don't us© them. I write
all applicants' name» on a sheet of
paper and send them all In to the
State Secretary at once.This s
?avcs
raise a big garden when summer ,
came.
Apparently he forgot that the
farmers also need shoes and cloth- !
ing for themselves, iheir wives and
children. He forgot that many of
them are in need of medical and ;
denial aid.
The standard of living that is
recommended by the relief agents
w iü result in greatly impaired 1
health for the farmers and their
families. He tried to justify thaï -
on the grounds that since workers 1 !
in the cities are .starving the farm i
ers should also starve or at least
be satisfied with a standard of
living lower than th e peen's ßrj
coolie s.
RESOLUTION TO LANGER |
A resolution was drawn up de- !
landing that Governor Larger j
cfl^to it: that an appropriation of ;
$2° 000 be made out of the R. P. ;
c - funus f °r each of the months j
A P ri l and May. Th e «aclutirn !
stated that "the $7,000 appropriai
er1 /°r the month of April proves
entirely inadequate to meet the j
mc f pressing needs."
Another resolution endorsed the (
P lan of ha ™g a keyman elected
b Y the People ir* each township to
take U P the relief cases and bring
to the County Emergency
Committee,
We know that the only way
that relief will be giv»en us is
when we fight for it. They
would sooner feed ua than
fight us and they will evdn
change "rules" in order to do
so.
I
sion *with power» to crush the
farmers. In addition to its
power» to investigate the milk
trust, wMch
since it is a milk trust bill,
the commission will have the
power "to compel testimony,
and to punish for contempt, to j
act as mediator and arbitra
tor in y controversy and to
name advisory market boads.
By these powers striking farm
can be punished for contempt
if they refuse to abide by the
mediation" and' "arbitration
the milk commissior.i.
mean nothing,
M
ers
..
of
SOFTENING" PRovKinv
SOFTENING PRO\ ISION
M , he „ ca f L lta ^list press admits that
u j he - autbor J ty g rant ed to
the board is practically dictator
.. The ««ly softening (?) pro
vision is one for appeal to the
courts." The onlv . "softening"
feature of the bill i s that the
farmers cai ï appeal from the devil
to th e devil's grandmother—from
the milk trust commission to the
milk trust courte.
H
MASS STRUGGLE IS ONLY
WAY OUT
The farmers of Ohio will have
to rely on mass action, oîn United
Front struggles of all farmers, to
get any real increases in price
from the milk trust.
the cost of cards and some post
age. In the last two day s 1 have
got a list of 41 applications, about
half of them women, and in
district where a dollar is about
much of a curiosity as a flealess
dog, so that due stamps
curse instead of a blessing, and
they cost money besides and
farmers have no money to buy
membership buttons and stamps.
a
as
are a
we
Now this is the way I have been
organizing here. I tell the farm
ers that the fee ig one dollar a
year, but that if they have !no
money they can contribute a nickel
or a dime as they are able at the
meetings and they are perfectly
willing to do so, in some neighbor
hoods about half of them
pay 25
cents 'with the application. Other
places 1 cannot get a dime,
still they are willing and
anxious
to joir with us and to pay a little,
as they are able. In this county
the farmers are to a great extent
getting relief to the extent of
about $8 a month. They have
other income.
no
No man can sup
port a family oni that amount.
Many of these men and
walk several miles to a meeting
but you cannot get blood out of
stone, so to my mind, dues stamp?
and application cards are
necessary expense.
women
a
an un
GAS COSTS TOO MUCH
I often walk 20 miles in a day
so I do not use gasoline or oil. I
get my meals at farm houses and
it is purely voluntary on the part
of the farmer. Very few farmers
have paid taxes, ard most of them
have a «plaster on their homes. I
have been to many homes where
the bill of fare is not by
, _ any
means equal to a congressman's
dinner and these poor farmers
.. I
Mil I FR FYPMIN
1T11LLtK LAlUjEj
REFORESTRY PLAN
\ i » * . u
A E?* iYl< ^ u ntameers "Ccir
* Hlth of Roosevelt-Wall
Street Program
(BY O. H. F.)
Little Rock, Ark., April 12.—AI
though the mountaineer farmers
of Stone county long ago stopped
paper subscriptions due to in
creased hard times and low in
ceme for their meager crops and
Were not uptodate on news of the'
rest of the states, they listened at
tentatively as Roy Miller of South;
Dakota gave them vivid examples
of how folks were living elsewhere
in these times.
Miller exposed the reforestation
plaSi of Roosevelt as a forced la
bor camp and another step of the
Wall Street government in ore
pa ri ng for war as the way oUt of
the crisis at the expense of the!
poor workers a-d farmers Since
Arkansas will have at least seven
of these camps in its national for
e sts and many of the farmer boys
between the age s of 18 and °4 ar
"taken in" by the idea the "farm
resentful toSvarda the
Democratic political Messiah who
had made such goldein promises
for a "new deal" to the "forgotten
man.
Since the Sunny land local Com
mittee of Action had sent a list of
grievances and program of do
matods for increased Reconstruc
tion Finance Corp. relief to
work on a weekly basis instead of
one day a month as now, Miller
warned the 60 members present
that night to be prepared for a'n
attack by the local bosses who
would try to break the farmers' or
ganization.
ers were
"
assure
Both Roy Miller andHugh Gore
of the Polk County Farmers Pro
tective Association have made a
tour of Arkansas, organizing lo
cals and addressing farmers' meet
ings. They report that farmers
becoming interested in the Com
mittee of Action form of organi
zation aird way of fighting for
lief.
are
re
CAROLINAS JOINT
STOCK LAND BANK
NEAR BANKRUPTCY
The First Carolinas Joint Stock
îf rd ,. Bank of Columbia (South
Carolina) is being reorganized in
order to avoid actual bankruptcy.
According to a statement issued to
the bondholders the bank ha«
mortgage loalns outstanding whose
principal totals $5,647,927. Of
this total nearly 50 per cent, $2,
542,598 in leans were delinquent as
far as principal and interest are
concerned.
This is approximately the situa
tion of the land barks thruout the
country. It is to save the bond
holders of these Joint Stock Land
Bsinks that Roosevelt is proposing
to donate $100.000,000 to the
v ,
^îf ^ ° f " farm
Producers News—$2 per
v ear
have to watch their children eat
less than the dogs of the idle rich
It may take a little while for these
people to pay an amount equal
the dollar a year fee, but they will
do it in time. I see no necessity
for much expense and I see r 0
do it in time,
for much expense and I
reason why other speakers cannot
ride a boxcar just as Well as I can.
It is not at all necessary to pay
a railroad or bus fare, in fact no
expense accourt is necessary for
r xi. •
_ !n th e issue of A pril 7 o f the
any speaker either man or woman.
a
CULTURAL AWAKENING" OF GERMANY UNDER FASCISM
_
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îascism m Germany means the most brutal oppress ion oi mi
ers, and of the Jewish people. Bernhardt Kuhnt, of Ghemnite ™ k 5 arm "
the streets in this garbage wagon because he refused to clean ' fhn
Behind him is another Jewish Victim, carrying a pail one of S r ^ er *
forced into degradation by Hitler. * P ' ° De of the hundreds of Jews
TO THE "FREE TOM MOONEY" CONGRESS
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Bellingham, Wash., April 21.
Somew here be
tween Bellingham and Chicago, two Whatcom coun
ty youtli, handcuffed together, are making their
way east, enroute to the "Free Mooney" Congress
to open in Chicago April 30.
The boys, Val Kohler and "Happy" Peterson,
left the city hall last Friday on their :ong hitch
h ke. Ihe key to the handcuffs was sent on to Chi
cago so that they cannot be released until they
reach that city.
This idea was conceived by the boys themselves
ard they are being supported by the Bellingham
Section of the International Labor Defense. The
boys have with them a goodly supply of postcards,
with their picture on the front and greetings to
Tom Mooney on the back.
DECEIVE FARMERS
BY TAX REDUCTION
Can Accomplish Something
if We Concentrate
Mass Action
on
(BY J. S.)
Toivola, Mich., April 15.—Now
the spring election craze is over
and all the so-called good
elected to office. Many a Worker
and poor farmer, looking for
w ay out of his or her miserable
condition fell prey to the sweet
melodies of the liberals, demagogs,
social-fascists, etc.
Many a farmer wa s roped in o!n
the one stumbling block, namely
reduced taxes, only to find that
dozein o r more indirect taxes have
taken the place of the personal tax
and the destitute farmer is given
another twist of the
men are
a
rope.
U. F. L. PROGRAM PLAIN
AND SIMPLE
Tire United Farmers League pro
gram on taxation as well
other farmers' problems i s very
plain an3 simple. Malny farmers,
hiwever,_or being confronted with
the U. F. L. taxation _
that it can't be done.
as on
program say
In one
Producers News I
I
| tt t? r ,. , ..
to!™ U ' *' L * 101 which lt state d it
was agreed that th e development
; of the work thruout the country
depended on the effective function-!
met of tL. nafienai — „ Per .
see the weekly
rpeort of the Executive Council of
! ing of the national office. .
■ sonally, I believe that the national
office could send out a trainload of
advice an d calls for cash, but what
We 1 e f d a great . deal mcre ' is sin
cere class consoous effort and in
div'dual sacrifice. I don't believe
w e need a great deal of office
s€ftis e they are right. As long
we listen to the liberals, demagogs,
social fascists, etc., and refuse to
accept the U. F. L. program just
that long will it be impossible.
The minute we concentrate
efforts in a determined effort to
oust our enemies once and for all
amd in their place place a militant
farmers'
as
our
program sponsored by
the United Farmers League
can; get some relief.
we
UNPAID CLERK GETS
10 MONTHS BECAUSE
HE STOLE FOR KIDS
Chicago, Ill., Aprfil 11.—Vincent
McCourt, or 17 years a clerk for
the board of education,
tenced to serve 10 months in jail
yesterday for stealing to feed his
family.
McCourt, like thousands of the
school teachers in the city, has
not been paid for months. The
agencies wouldn't help him
because he still had a job.
stele $1,600 of tax anticipation
warrants to feed his family of 8
children.
The Judge said McCourt's po
sition was "tragic" but sentenced
him nevertheless, with the croco
dile excuse that
be enough policemen in Chicago to
hold! them in check" if all the
paid city workers got some pay in
that way.
was sen
re
lief
He
<t
there wouldn't
un
- -—- w
forget that a good appetite can be
worked up with the physical exer
cise required in walking from ore
farm to another This is of cou-L
I i mpossib le where farms '
work, but we do need a great deal
of use of shoe leather and not to
can be
, „„pusaioie wnere farms are a half
mile or so apart as a rule A o-rÜf
; many locals and units of différât
organizations have been broken up
i because of continual beggine but
perhaps I am all wet all the w^v
1 round, so I would lifco ruv,
express themselves. 1 k H
International
News
France Starts War Hysteria
Paris, April 24.—Th e French imperialist*
attempting to stimulate i war hysteria by IU ,.
of wholesale spying along the German an «l
Italian frontiers. The capitalist press report tli
thi s "spy scare is comparable or]y with the
sale imprisonment of suspects just before th*
break of the World War.
are
cut
• '
Hitler "Plot*" Directed at
Soviet Union
Berlin, April 24.—Two moi e persons have been
arrested in Munich and are "suspected" 0 f plo*
ling the assassination of Hitler. The report that
o: e of them is an "Indian Communist
and a f«>
mer resident of Russia" shows that Hitler'is usin»
nhese "plots" to prepare for war
Soviet Union.
against the
Will Quit Socialist International
Derby, England, Apiil 16.—Agui., st the wish
of the leaders tiie iindependent Labor 1 any voted
83 bo- 79, at the coifeience to
(Socialist) International and to
Communist International with a view to anilia
uoin. John Patton, general secretary, and Fenner
Brockway, chaiiman of the party, both agitated
/against the move.
qurte Uk
8ecei:d
appicach the
Hitler Has Huge Armed Force
Prague, Czechoslovakia, April 13.—Germany
has at its disposal today 770,000 men trained for
war, according to an estimate in the i
Libove Novfny. Its figures follow:
The Reichsweir
The Navy .
Régulai police .
Auxiliary police
Nazi troopers ..
Stahlhelm .
ewspaper
.too, m
. 15,0M
.120,064
45,006
.430,004
.. 60,004
Total
.770,040
Of these, the nëwspaper asserts, 282,000
iqady for immediate actioin and the other*
being tiained under high pressure.
are
Japanese Police Murder Workers
Leaders
Tokyo, Japan.—Two members of the Central
Committee of the Communist Party of Japan
believed to have been murderel by the police, it
is announced by the Niholn Sekishoky Kuyenkai,
Japanese Section of the International Red Aid,
parent organization of the America^ International
Labor Defense.
The two revolutionaries were arrested and then
could no longer be traced. Lately two beheaded
bodies, bearing marks of violence, were repoited
removed from the city by the police.
are
Soviet Protests Japanese Attacks
Moscow, April 17.—L. M. Karakhan, Ausl
and Commissar of Foieign Affairs in a recent note
to Tamekichi Ota, Japanese AmbassaLor to the
Soviet Union, has protested the violation of the
rights of the Soviet Union along the Chinese East
ern Railway i!n Manchuria by the Japanese. The
note stated that the "mure t, looting and ; tass
arrests of Soviet citizens were never so serieus
as now
yy
Independent Labor Party Backs
Soviet
Derby, England, April 17.—The annual con
ference of the Independent Labor party today
pledged thjat if Great Britain made any attempt
to attack the Soviet Union the party would fight
for the Soviet Union. A. Fenner Brockway stated
that if war did occur they would attempt not only
to bring about the defeat of Imperialist England
but also the end of the capitalist system.
Japanese Troops Intensify
Struggle
Peking, April 17.—Japanese troops advanced
southward along the Peiping-Muklcn Railway to
North China, after having captured that part of
Chinwa^gtao near which the United State® Fif
teenth Infalntry has its summer camp.
Arrest "Suspect" for Hitler
Munich, Germany, April 17.—A man arrested
dressed in a Nazi uniform was ai rested in Berech
tesgaden. 'today. He i s
Hitler, He fortunately "made himself oonspicaeug
by his strange behavior and his contradictory - c tate
mnets" so the police could easily pick him up. Hit
ler is r inding fake plots on his life *is necessary
a s Mussolini.
suspected" of a pht <> n
Guard Daniels in Mexico City
Mexico City, April 14.—Two hundred police
meiii, guarded Josephus Daniels when he arrived
tb take his job as ambassador to Mexico. Froffi
♦ he station to the embassy the streets wen
with poilicemen and a large guard surrounded H' e
embassy itself, Daniels
when Vera Cruz wa s bombarded by the V. S.
Navy in. 1914.
Secretary of the
was
France Prepares for Debt
Struggle
Former Premier Eduard Herriot, who i*
♦he
to the
representative of the French capitalists
coming economic conference at Washington,
propose a moratorium on the Frerch debt p»T
of tM
will
ment due on June 15. This move is.part
French campaign in the imperialist struggle
will be brought out at the conference.
"Third Degree" Becomes
Hypnotism
Allan Mionkhouse, or© of the British engu**"
who was found guilty of spying while in
and deported, now claims that MacDonald,
his colleagues, Vho confessed to acting
British Intelligence Service, wa s hyptooti**^
the Russian political police. He claimed
himself, almost succumbed because all h*
se© during the examination and trial waa . .
•yea, eyes." First he »aid it was th» "thW
free" now he »ay» it wa# "hypnotism-"
**
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