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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, August 25, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, Image 1

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8 J? R,Cal SOCIETY
OF Montana
Helena
ARY
_ _ _ COUNTY EDITION
THE PRODUCERS NEWS
OCR literature
0 f oui l eague
whether we
distri
BACKBONE OF
ORGANIZATION
The Producers News is the
backbone of eur organization
and makes the work much
easier." — Frank Muitland,
Beltrami county, Minnesota.
VSE
future
•*Xh e
de pemls a
».
lot on
pf' Î" '{(oilier, What
bUi county, Washington.
(010
_ official organ of the united farmers league _
PLENTYWOOD. SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA. FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1933
jnTxVl Number 22.
J ubUsKed Weekly.

I
(BANGED TACTICS TO
COLLECT FARM DEBTS
Pi
OUT
I
I
farm protests responsible
!
a/ALL ACE ANNOUNCES PAYMENTS WILL BE
MADE TO WHEAT FARMERS; NO PRIOR
DEDUCTIONS ON LOANS
fanners in Northwest Being Robbed at Elevators to Pay
Government Loans; New Real Demands Payments
Equal to Amount Spent for Harvesting
WILL TRY "PERSUASSIGN" TO COLLECT
The rumblings of protest among the impoverished wheat
fanners against the attempted swindle by the Roosevelt ad
ministration has reached Washington and a new tack has
been taken in regard to the attempt to collect government
debts out of the wheat bonuses. The voice of the farmers
ha? suddenly made the Roosevelt politicians and brain trust
change their ideas of the legal basis for swindling the
fanners.
en
Secretary Wallace announced on Aug. 17 that wheat
farmers who sign up in the allotment scheme "Will receive
their checks without off-set for governmental indebtedness."
A HITCH!
There is, however, a hitch to
this sudeen benevolence of the
Roosevelt administration. "T h
Farm Credit Administration is
asking that both wheat and cotton
farmers apply as much of the
proceed? (the allotment bonus) to
their debts to the government as
the can." The Department of Ag
riculture hastens to point out that
"there is no compulsion about it
in either case," in order to allay
the resentment developing among
the farmers at the attempted |
swindle by the Roosevelt admini- j
I rtmftwn, !
wliMt I
bP I
_ i
- ■
1
1
;
Farmers Have Not Bene- •
T r r , iNOt . C
Med from Increase m
!
Washington, Aug. 20-The :
Roosevelt administration ad-,
mils in a recent report that
tiie farmers of the county
have "Less increase in their
actual buying power thus far
than might be expected judg
sBSSk
Partment, "and other thou
WJiTS? i' nd t poul ;
^ bv hi'rpric^fe^s
*l e ri se in .orain already has
The checks for cutting
«create will be turned over to
FARMER BUYING
POWER IS LOW
in Prices
of the Depart-1
«Ht of Agriculture, in discussing
Price movement, declared,
16 the prices of man^ import
t products including cotton and
totn < riseT1 more than the
H /^ speculation Fd),
, 01 »vestock products in gen_
- 0 „ ly sma „ If
Jk ^rmers are graduallv
,earnm * the bitter *ruth of
admiscions by Roosevelt's
They are realizing that
t a serious problem for
trSmli 1 ,, Haivymen and P° ul -
Dr - 0. c. Stine
f 0r «^'* er troths mean misery
and their families.
LEAGUE ORGANIZER APPLAUDED AT HOLIDAY MEETING DESPITE MISLEADERS
u
^ flints
r> ATTEMPT TO RAISE RED SCARE
p AILS MISERABLY; FARMERS STAY
TO HEAR JAMES FLOWER
JAMES
Fairbault,
fa nners
FLOWER)
Minn, — About
i
nieptm ° pi usent at 1
fai-m Pr , . n? . ca ^ e< l by the
s holiday Association,
I were Rev Flint '
a lawyer!
^nner nSL F S s ' A retired
^rman ^ Mlller was the
«50
the
i* of tti with a
W had .^ Tners found -that
listen to
w Wtfa* hay (or the
some
*
fanners directly, and the govern
ment agencies will then attempt to
collect as much of the seed, feed,
and other loans as possible thru
forceful "persuasion" and not
compulsion.
THE RIGHTS OF WALL
STREET
Public statement has yet
b e ©n made with regard to
u
99
hens on wheat held by the F*®"'!
era l Land Baraks or Intermediate
Credit Banks - 1x1 the case of the
cotton farmers, however, the Farm
Credit Administration has de-|-~
c * ded that where crop liens have
been "given to the Federal Land
Banks as security for interest or
principal payments in default on
mortgage contracts." . . "the Land
Banks must consider their obliga
lions to their bondholders (Wall
Street—Ed.) secured by the mort
gages affected." Furthermore, in
the case of notes "originally given .
to banks and loan Corporations i
and redis<,ounted b y th e Federal I
Intermediate Credit Banks" ....
"the rights both of individual en.i
dor sers and of owners of deben-!
rorsers ana ot owners or neoen ,
tures of the Intermediate
Ba " k \ . Street agam!-Ed)
must cor8Î '- Te '**
;
'
16 S.D. COUNTIES
NOW IN LEAGUE
j
Two New Locals Launched
BV Walstad and Soltis
in Davidson County
i
A FAIR PROPOSITION
TO THE BANKS
All cotton checks will be made
out to the farmer and to the Farm
(CuntimiPd on ragf* T«-o)
Tv/r-i. i n o T-k i 7
Mitchell, S. D., Aug. .
A United Farmers Leagu 1 "
ganization meeting was held
I here in Prosper township, ad
dressed by the State Secre
tary Julius Walstad and John
G. Soltis, UFL organizer.
Two locals were launched. J.
q Anderson was made coun
j •
Sixteen counties are now
for th T e hlë Tf
Umted Farmers League -state
conference to be held in Ab
erdeen on Sept. 18 and 19, to
lay down a program of action
for relief.
stock the coming winter. In the
course
of talking with the farm
ers we met Mr. Smith who ia oc
live in the Holiday Association and
he asked me to speak as he had
beard me before. We suggested
*bat he ask the Chairman, Mr.
He did but was tunned
Miller.
down ae Mr. Miller had heard that
Flower was a Communist.
"BE PATIENT" SAYS
REVEREND
After a while the Rev. Flint was
introduced and made a very know
CUBAN MASSES BITTER
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*
These Cyban workers ransacked the palace offormer
President Machado. In the picture they are display
ing a ' 'To Let" sign before the palace. Wall Street has
put in a new tenant under the protection of its war
ships. It is President De Cespedes. One day, however,
the Cuban working people will control their countiy.
HULL ATTEMPTS TO
0n bis returti from London *
Secretary Hull repeated his * :
statement of a few weeks ago *
that the failure of the World *
Economic Conference child not *!
be admitted because it would * j
mean that the illusion« of the * r
working people would be dis- *
pelled-.
"To preach (he failure and ■
futility of the World Econo- *
* mis Conference at this prema- •
* ture stagey would be to preach *
* the gospel of despair both as *
^ , mîm . rv *
", * #
««»V »a,d Hull.
. . . .
MAINTAIN FAITH IN i
WORLD CONFERENCE 1
to Live, Pay Interest on
SEVERE DROP IN
FAR MER S' INCOME
Group of Farmers Expected
$257 Annual Income
Washington, Aug. 21.—A sur
vey made by the Department of
Agriculture of 6,383 far m er e
shows that their net income dur
ing 1932 was smaller than for any
of the eleven preceding years for
which records have been kept.
The average of $257 of oash in
come over cash expenses for 1932
compared with $458 of net income
in 1931 During 1929 a group of
10,805 farmers averaged $1,097
net income while in 1928 the av
erage was $1,090.
These figures are only AVER
AGE figures and therefore do not
represent the condition of the
most impoverished farmers. Fur-
Thev do not take into account the
C(yndition of reT , te rs and tenants,
Out of the $257 average for 1 928
t >, is ffrnup 0 f farmers wae sup
j nosed not onlv to live but to pay
j int°rest to the bankers.
ing speech. He talked about the
stars and Spengler, the^ Genian
philosopher, and only mentioned
the fact that there existed two
definite classes in society once in
the whole speech. His whole speech
refutation of militant action
and its key note wae "be patient"
and -wait for Roosevelt. Very little
applause greeted him at his finish.
Mr. Miller, that retired fanner,
then introduced his bosom pal ano
life long friend, Mr. Martin. ar
tin assured the farmers that the
only reason that more lawyers
were not good friends of the arr ^ -
ers was that the fanners uM>h
have sense enough to know what
good friends lawyers could be. He
bas alwavs been a good friend of
the farmers, according to himself.
He pointed to that other great
was a
__
Figures of Treasury Dept.
cl. flOO RanLe
^ o,UUU UK
With frozen Deposits
Washington, Aug. 21 — Two
billion dollars of deposits are
still f rozen i n closed banks 01
those on a restricted
. • ^ rordin(r to a rpnort I
P asis ' ^ t0 T ^ eport
issued by Walter J. Cumm-i
ine'S executive assistant Sec
ngs execuuv assistant bee
'«»ry ot me lieasury.
TWO BILLION IS
BANKING WRECK
1

On Aug. 12 there were yet
closed or operating on a re
stricted basis 909 national
banks having deposits of $954,
304,000 ; 95 State member in
j sitmtions, with deposits of
$204,134,000, and 1,866 hon
member institutions, exclusive
i of mutual savings banks, with
deposits of $1,005,355,000.
Deposits in open banks to
tal $33,737,728,000, while a ^b
tal of $2,163,803,000 is tied up
in closed or restricted banks.
I
This does net include the billione
tied up in the mutual savings
banks. Toward the end of June
over $7,500,000,000 was tied up in
these mutual savings banks. No
further information has üeen given
out on these deposits because they.
are still tied up—lost for the most
part to the small depositors.
Our National Secretary, Alfred
Tiala, hae written an important
pamphlet on this subject entitled,
The Next Step for the American
Farmers.
pamphlets at 2 cents each for 10C
or more and 3 cents for less than
100. They retail for 5 cents each
and can be obtained frim the Pro
duoers News. Ple' tywood, Mon
+ ana.
THE UNITED FRONT
< '
Order a bundle of
tries TO GAG FLOWER
^ ^ ^ t0
e ^. me gpeafc but had regularly
toJ(j th<>se who that ^ pr0 _
w too long At ms stagre
when the banners could see that
they were getting no place they
on the chairmen to let me
lawyer and "leader" of the farm
ers, Governor Olson. Mr. Martin
assured the crowd of his good
American ancestors.
After his speech of sticking by
the "New Deal" and Roosevelt the
fanners were asked to join in the
Holiday Association. Only two
responded. To the hay deal no
one responded.
He introduced me as a Com
munist. I have never denied
SSS
by MisLEADERs
Farmers Strong for Strike
But Leaders Make Peace
WitFTGov. Lehman
NO VOTE IS TAKEN
Chief Betrayer of Strike
I Was City Detective, Was
Boosted by Press
(By Special Correspondent)
Utica, New York, Aug. 18.
The strike of the New Yorkj
dairy farmers has been ended !
—for the time being. The i
sentiment of the farmers is : i
If the Milk Control Board 1
does not give us better prices
; within 30 days, wa will go on j
! strike again.
: This is not what the leaders say !
j however. They have . reversed |
' their position of three weeks ago. 1
j At that time they said,
I strike is against the Milk Board." j
i Now they say "The Milk Board is !
: alright. It just neec's time a"d a
(little fixing."
NO VOTE OF FARMERS
TAKEN
They have never put to a vote
the question of whether the strike
is to begin again on Monday, Aug.
21, or not. Instead they speak of
the strike as "over," and the
"truce" is no logger mentioned.
Typical of what happened is
the following incident. Three
thousand farmers met here
yesterday to vote on whether
This
the truce would end in a re.
riewal of r ihSe strike on Mon
day or rtot- One leader, Wal
ter Blair of Chenango county,
declared in the course of Ws
speech, "The state militia
won>, stop us." The farmers
cheered arid applauded this.
Blair gh»t frightened at this
and then said, "But we wont
defy tih'e state.
PLAN TO DECLARE
STRIKE ILLEGAL
agency and that any strike against
it is against the state. In this way
he is Drenarimr to declare ill
he ls P re Pf nn S declare ""««J
any strike by the dairy farmers of
-^ ew York fox higher prices.
Woodhea cUc(
(the fanners in this strike as
The governor has stated that
the Milk Control Board ie ia state
the strike of last spring, was
Rochester city detective two years
ago. His house and barn burned
down and he was charged wiih
arson. In order to have the charge
dropped he quit hig job.
WOODHEA D MAIN
BETRAYER
He began doing small town jobs
and then started a oampaign
against the Dairymen's League.
I This proved to be a popular issue
j and he was able to build his orga
nization. He wa s a leader in the
strike last spring and; sold it out
by urging the formation of the
Milk Board. He called this strike
I off even though he was not the
| only loader. His calling off
the strike made the other leaders
| panicky and they called a truce,
Woobhead is discredited in
central area where the strike was
strongest. He was made a leader
by the capitalist press who refused
to give space for n long time
mention any other leader.
-
I will be found in the new pamphlet
| written by a Wisconsin farmer.
i called "Why I Joined the United
; Farmers League." The ptamphlet
; costs one cent each. Order ten
1 for your neighbors.
Four reasons why you should
join the United Farmers League
that I am a Communist so I
hold the farmers that we put
our faith in mass action and
not in the promises of the
lawyers and preachers. I ate»
pointed out the lack of any
cohstraotire program at that
meeting and gave a simple
program of what I thought
alJouLd be the demands of the
farmers. I pointed out' at the
name time that even wirining
our immediate demanda will
not solve the crisis, that the
only way out Is the revolu
tionary way out arider the
leadership of *fie Communist
party.
FARMERS APPLAUD
FLOWER
I received far more applause
|j ov - Wer Admits Nothing Has
Been Done to Provide Relief for
N. Dakota Farmers and Workers
Answering Ingerson's Open Leitet
Executive Expresses "Keen Interest
99
■*
I
I
I
GOV. LANGER EVADES
QUESTION OF RELIEF
I
STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR
BISMARCK
(
William Langer, Gov.
Aug. 3, 1933
Mr. Ashbel Ingerson
Flaxton, North Dakota
My Dear Ingerson:
, I am in receipt of your favor of July 31, and I
want to assure that I have taken a very keen interest
in every county in the State, and especially in the
southwestern part where the crops have been burned
up and spoiled by the grasshoppers. I believe that
arrangements have been made whereby the people of
these counties will be well taken care of during the
coming winter.
The Committee that I appointed some time ago
went through these counties, and got firsthand infor
mation, and also had the opportunity to see for them
selves just what the farmers were up against.
Tn every -speech I have made in the last months.
I have urged the people to let me know if there is
anyone in need, and I will send someone out to take
care of them. We have gone the limit both in the
state and in getting Federal Aid, and I think every
thing will come along alright.
If you have any more suggestions to make, will
you kindly write me again.
With best regards, I am
Very sincerely yours,
WILL LANGER,
i
- I
Governor.
1
1
i
1
<
1
(
i
Ingerson Calls Governor
In Open Letter; Demands
Needy Be Given Aid Now
FARMERS NORTH DAKOTA
STATE COMMITTEE OF ACTION
Ashbel Ingerson, Sec.
Flaxton, North Dakota
August 14, 1933
Governor Wm. Langer
Bismarck, N. Dak.
Dear Governor:
of
to
might be alright. But I have noticed that your relief ad- j
ministrators are very much inclined to give out as little as
they think will be accepted without too much rebellion ; that
they have the wrong attitude and think that the needy are
entitled to only a bare existence instead of a healthful liv
And your relief administrator does his (or her) best
I was very glad to receive your reply to my letter of
July 31 on the subject of relief that is so badly needed now.
1 feel that if you act as generously as you speak that things
to instill these sort of ideas into the county relief boards.
These county relief boards are usually composed
entirely of county officials who draw good sal
aries and other persons who are very far from
needing relief themselves. After some of the usual in
structions from your representative they are in no
frame of mind to give adequate relief to those that do
need it.
They make every effort to
make it unpleasant and dis
agreeable to apply for and
get relief. They try to make
it appear that it is some
what of a disgrace to apply
for it; that it is "charity" in
stead of a JUST DUE from a
society that has permitted
them to be reduced to want.
Consequently large numbers
(Continued *n 'Two')
than the former speakers and at
my conclusion foe Reverend Flint
got up and attacked me and the
Communist party, the Unite®
Farmers League and all other or
ganizations as disrupters of the
labor movement. After he was
through the lawyer Martin took a
crack at me and told how the
lawyers and other good liberals
had made the laiwe that allowed
like me to disrupt and
them. A farmer or two
persons
annoy
tried to ask him a question hut he
would not answer. No one ap
plauded the efforts of either Flint
Martin to disown the terms
radicalism and change it to lib—
or
eralism.
After they were through a form
er's wife asked the crowd if they
wanted to have Mr. Flower give
FARMERS PREFER U. F. L. PROGRAM OF STRUG
GLE IN PREFERENCE TO POLICY OT
PATIENCE
99
ii
an answer to the charges made by
Flint and Martin. Several said
they did.
REMAIN TO HEAR UFL
SPEAKER
The cheer leaders Messers Flint,
Martin and Miller immediately
cried out "This is a Holiday meet
ing." "He can't speak here," etc.
The formers juet sat and Mr.
Miller then adjourned the meet
ing.
We called another meeting
and all the farmen dbayed. I
Has "Gone the Limit" for Drought
Stricken and Unemployed But
"Hopes for Hie Best"; Appointed
Committee and Hade Lot a t
Speeches
LONG ON 'SYMPATHY',
SHORT ON 'ACTION'
Sec, Ingersori for Farmers Com
mittee of Action, Demandé Défi,
nke Information; H»w Much
Money Has He Gotten and How
Much Applied For
WIVES, CHILDREN
CANT EAT "HOPE

Flaxton, N. D., Aug. 15.—
The drouth-stricken and
; hoppered out farmers and
unemployed workers of North
Dakota will be left to starve
and freeze the coming fall
and winter for any thing that
Gov. Langer has done to
; wards the prevention of the
I üame, if one may judge from
I his answer to the "Open
i Letter" sent to him by Sec
! Ashbel Ingerson of the Farm
ers State Committee of Ac
tion, July 31 and published in
the Producers News August
4. The governor admits in
i his letter that nothing has
been done outside of appoint
■ ing a committee and making
several promises in sneeches
j which he has net fulfilled.
HAS GONE
THE "LIMIT
99
The governor says he has
gone the limit" for the im
(Continued on Page Two)
COTTON CROP IS
OVERESTIMATE
Destruction of 4,147,000
Bales From Third
Largest Crop
Washington, Aug. 15.—Destruc-
tion of 4,247,000 bales of cotton
is estimated in the report of the
Department of Agriculture on the
crop outlook. After aeducting this
destroyed cotton the crop this
year will total 12,314,000 bales,
Had h not been for the cotton
destroyed or to be destroyed un-
der , the . diction of the Agncul-
-ural Adjustment Administration
the crop this year would have
been 16,561,000 baits, the third
largest crop on record. This year*
crop would have been surpassed
only by the crops of 1931 and 1926
when 17,096,00 bales and 17,977,-
000 bales respectively were pro-
duced.
/
While millions of farmers and
workers go ragged the only
thought that comes to the mind of
the brain trust is destruction of
over four million bales of cotton.
It is a thought worthy of a nut
house—or a capitalist government.
spoke for half an hour and
many questions were asked.
Many did not agree with the,
program of action in all its
details but %e feeling seemed
to be that an were in favor
of rank and file farmers for
leaders. The farmers expres
sed no hope or faith in 'Hie
Ottertail County Farmers
Holiday Association and asked
me Ho come and speak in
Ottertail County. We will do
so In the near future.

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