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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, August 25, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, Image 4

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Attempt to White Wash
Lynchers
l
Tusialooea, Ala, Aug. 16.—In order to
whitewash the know* killers of Dan Pippen
and A. T. Harden, the county grand jury has
ordered the bodies of the Negroes exhumed.
They plan to get the bullets with' which they
were killed aind trace the killtrs that way.
This farce is being carried on just because the
killers are known, not only to the sheriff who
turned »he Negro h ys over to them, but also
to the grand jury.
Will Continue Disarmament
Farce
Hyde Park, N. Y, Aug. 22.—Roosevelt to
day decided in corfererce with Norman Davis,
the latter should return to the Disarmament Con
ference wrhich reopens on Oct. 16, in order to con
tinue the f'.rce cf disarming in words and to
camouflage armi 1 g in fact.
10,000 Strike Despite N. R. A.
5
Chicago, Aug. 22.—Ten thousand clothing
workers went on strike today in order to prevent
4he worsening cf their conditions, provided for
in N. R. A. codes.
Nationwide Ballyhoo Organized
By President
Washington, Aug. 22.—Thirty thousand bally
hooers hr.ve been organized by the Roosevelt ad
irinistra ion to spread the gospel of the NRA,
Cabinet members, judges, preachers of all credes,
writers >rnd actors have been enrolled to carry
thru this nationwide attempt to mislead Amer
ican working people.
Hurricane Kills Eight in Virginia
Norfolk, Va., Aug. 23.—Unconformed reports
indicate that eight persons have been killed in the
hurricane stricken area around here. These re
ported y three Negroes who were electro
cuted by high tension wires and one white baby |
who wag w-ashed into a sewer while playing in
the storm waters.
t
Haul Down Fascist Flag
Rochester, N. Y.—A crowd of German work
ers hauled down a Nazi swastika flag and tore
it to bits, when it was raised as Otto C. Kiep,
Germa" consul-general arose to speak at the Ger
man Field Day here August 6. Members of the
Arbeiters Saengurbund, a workers' singing society,
left the celebration, and •?. large number of the i
other Germans present walked out with them.
I
j
1. L. D. Forces Freedom for
Russell Gordon
Norfolk, Va. —Framed charges of "rape" !
against Russell Gordon, 13 year old Negro boy, j
were dismissed in court August 8, when the case !
came up, as a result of the huge mass campaign j
and brilliant legal defense put up by the Inter
national Labor Defence on his behalf.
The issue of exclusion of Negroes from grand
und petit juries, raised n court by Ernest Merill, j
I. L. D. attorney, created a sensation and finally
deeded the Judge, also court officials to dismiss
I
the framed charge mther than have a Scottsboro
cate, with its attendant exposure of Negro oppres
sion and d/scrimiratlon and the denial of Civil
rights in Norfolk.
British-U. S. Conflict for Canada
Banff, Canada, Aug. 14.—A counter attack
against British imperialism in the interests of
W all Street w as made today by Sir Robert
Falconer, president of the fif.h Bienniel con
ference of the Insstitute of Pacific Relations,
to the members of their first general meet
ing. He pointed oul how closely the inter- ,
ests of the Canadian capitalists are linked up
with those of Wall Street. He warned the
British imperialists that "even Brttafn could
not count infallibly on receiving the ad
hesion of all the members of the (British)
commonwealth (of nations)".
Marathon Runner Faces
Eviction
Medfird, Mass.—Jimmy Hennigan, famous
marathon runner, has just two cays left before he
! v,
is evicted from his home. Hennigan finds it im
possible to get a job in order to »sustain himself,
his wife and six children. The bosses were only
interested in his running not his livelihood.
Nineteen Seamen Refuse
Scab Jobs
New York.—Enraged seamen smashed the win
dows at the Seamen's Church Institute when they
learned that a new crew of 19 men had been
shipped to break the strike of the S. S. Dimond
Cement in Baltimore. One worker was arrested.
The 19 New York seamen, when they heard that
the ship was on s-'rike, refused to scab and the
vessel is completely tied up.
City Workers Robbed of Million
for Relief
New York.— City employees have been
forced to contribute $1,332,647 to unemployment
relief during the past year Commissioner Taylor
announced to Mayor O'Brien. This is the third
year that city employees have been forced to "do
nate" more than a million dollars for relief in
order to spare the bankers.
$1,650,000 in Kansas Bond
Forgery
Topeka, Kan., Aug. 20. —The total of the
Kansas bond forgeries is now said to be close to
$1,650,000. One Ronal Finney is supposed to be
the brains behind the deal in which state officials
are involved. Finney simply went to printers with
legal looking documents ordering the bonds and,
kben sold them in Chicago an<i elsewhere.
/
___ PRODUCERS NEWS
Will Require $15,000 to Inform
Roosevelt of Missouri Project
°£n?X A REAL estate association tries to milk coun
ties TO PAY FOR JUNKET TO WASHINGTON AND FOR
LEATHER BOUND VOLUMES
NORTH
k
Forbes 3 This
roroes .n. uak, Aug. 3.—rhis
week, while the Dickey county
commissioners —*
session
emiMaues of the Greater Nonn'
Dako.a Assn., headed by the high
pressure Lannier desce'ced uoon
the c^ntyWtoîTtoTeoS^
"dads" on the Missouri River Di
veision ProÂT ^gS othï
Ïtee?
Dakota's rainfall inches
and restore the pressure in the ar
T 18 !!, •
M ^ ie ^!i m0St of the people of
North Dakota r.re inclined to
swallow this, in part at least. We
are all in favor of work conser
' a lor 7 e . c ''.« Tld specially if such
a j>rojoct will put a few thousand!
0 e a ® s . unem Ployed to work
at decent Imrg wages. Because
J . 00 'H^the pree, a gr»at
r ny 0 u s leved that the pro
J r., Wai l TT?* m - S ° me PartS
, ... f s : ate ' , now . seemc the
mitial s eps of the i-evitoble red
p a\e rot en negotiated yet.
Il mus' be -nroDerlv
x mus ne properly
were in
HOW TO IMPRESS THE
PRESIDENT
According to Lannier, *he propo.
i sition must he presented to, Mr,
1 Roosevelt.
!
.
'
!
;
Spanish Peasants In
Fight to Save Crops
i PEASANTS CHASE JUDGE OUT OF COURT AS HE
PREPARES TO HEAR EVICTION
PROCEEDINGS
j ----
Barcelona, Spain, July 24.—The struggle between the
landlords
. j « j n
rans and London Bankers
Feel it Is Inevitable;
Exnected Strike« *
0mKeS
poverty stricken
broken out again in several
SEE INFLATION
BY ROOSEVELT
Bankers in both London and
2? t *« tt* r/b'.r 1
step of the Roosevelt administra
tion will be inflation. They feel
that Roosevelt will be driven to
tnat Roosevelt will be driven to
arder to ^ ee P tb e capital
ist sbip ^ loat -
From Paris the Nw York Time.»
"Financial circles believe
*bat the United States govern,
men * wdl Pursue the in flat ton
P ro £ ra,n wbicb bas been
quenM furt¥er d< , crease in , he
dollar is possible.
correspondent writes.
EVERY STEP INFLATIONARY
"There is no belief here in
an anti-inflatinary policy kutw
attributed to President Roose
vek. Virtually every step taken
and. proposed is inflationary,
wheWer the effect is felt im
mediately or in the future.
Opinion here remains un
changed that in the long run
the dollar virtually is certain
to fall again unless dévalua
tion and stabilization at a
Pew basis are very soon de
cidod on" which ~is practically
The Paris bankers say that the
National Recovery Act will cei
tainly melon oirect attacks on the
the living wages of the workers
on indirect attacks thru inflation.
The New York Times correspon
dent in London reports a similar
attitude there.
'-he same thing.
, ATTACKS ON WORKERS'
LIVING STANDARDS
L is obvious that employers
would seek to alleviate the
burden laid upon them by the
wage increases and reduction
in working hours. Now it
appears that they can manage
It ONLY AT THE EXPENSE
OF THE WORKERS Unless
they are supported more large
ly by bainks and the Recon-i
struc ion Finance Corporation
in which case rt would be pos
sible to say the United States
is definitely entering the path
of monetary inflation," Infla
tion will lower the workers*
living staindards by raising
the prices of the goods *hey
have to buy and keeping their
wages down under the NRA.
Therefore, the "Strikes which
have broken out in different parts
of the United States caused
great surprise here."
a
no
Free Milk Pledged to
Striking Fur Workers
of N. Y. Dairy Farmers
Gloversville, N. Y., Aug. 8.—At
a meeting of farmers held ot
Perth las* night to form a Pulton
county organization the farmers
many of whom are «already strik
ing, told a delegation of workers
'hat they would give several can«
of milk daily to the striking for
lining cutters at GWersville.
piesenve , d -' This proper present*
tion includes tûe compiling
publishing of four
ana
i volumes of le
ahf ■ *" 0Ker " create a laïor -
*J\ ■ * mpr ® Sbl0n ? n the estheüc
^ scholarly president, these vol
T? ? "<«. »nly have an ar.
wu they must be
°T ? ^
*> 2Ä ÄÄ2
^fntf of^tart ° ^ ^
ft also includes a junket to
Washington by a group of influ
tntl lls consisting 0 f a pair of col
lege professors, a squad of ergi.
neers ard two or three of the
Greater. North Dakota Assn, flur
kies headed' by National Demo
critic Committeeman Hec Perry,
All this can't of course be done on
a shoestring.
To pay for the printing, lea - her.
tra r sporta ion, hotels, entertain
ment ' tips ' listerine '^nd mineral
water a fund of at least $15,000 is
needed. This, understand is just
for the proper presentation to the
President, which is if course or
firs-t importance.
r»VT v et «An rv-.r. m ,
ONLY *1,000 TOR WATER
Ibei , opp ®^ re t,,rc /» r
the.-* tactics according to Mr.
1
1
#
At the small village of Aguilar
i de " e 8Tarra 400 peasants called re-1
j centl y at tbe farmhouse of a pro
pnetor at 4 o'clock in the morning
and displayed guns and a rope and
threatened death if the landlord
took further action to collect rent
als or dispossess any of his ten-1
• ants ' Tbey then invad ?d his barns
and seized his hay crop.
I , A day or two previously at the
i Vllla ß e of O^stellety Gernnal, a
^roup of peasants descended upon
a law court, which was about to
proceedings and put
peasants in Catolonia has
spots,
hear eviction
j* ***
flight, at the same time warning
the judge not to ord*
evictions.
r any more
evictions. The next day court
documents bearing on evictions
j were seized at another place.
Oases of crop seizure by tenants
: are becoming more frequent. The
j peasants, are holding mass meet
j in ? s declaring that if their wishes
are not quickly m et they will seize
the land for themselves.
Timers Were Unable to
Faj Enormous Cost of
Drainage Ditch
-
(BY E. P.)
J Hecla, S. D., Aug. 6.—Bcndhoid
; e rs, many of whom live outside of
! the state, must have theirs, goo :
1 times or bad, it has been decreed,
anf l 80 BroSvn county is preparing
Lke tax deeds on more than
, 15,000 acres of land i-r the eastern
| Pari of the county on which drain
, age assessments are delinquent.
! Th e land will then be sold 1 to raise
the money due.
pj^ttoa^y^ fSTure^ w^put^hra
a few years ago> owr the protests
of ^ iny of t he small farmers of!
t h e region. The enormous cost
. was assessed against those who
benefit
1,500 ACRES WILL
GO TO S.D. COUNTY
'
were supposed to from
«■
nnd nn increaned load of debt
the lirmena Vho had to foot the
bill, helping many of them along
on ihe road to a "bust up."
"
STRIKERS DEFEND
SEVES IN ATTACK
BY MOUNTED COPS
Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 1 .—
mor e than 2,000 eTrikers and
strike sympathizers hurled
stones (thro the windows of
the Cambria Silk Hosiery mil)
when the «winer ported two
blue eagle NRA (National Re
covery Administration) signs
in the window.
Thirty five strikers
rerted aft<* * fight with the
police in which strikers, used
stdnes to defend IhSemselves.
Strike breakers were deluged
with a stone shower when
)*hey left the mill.
Mounted pohoemen clubbed
strikers, men and women,
alike, with the utmost bro.
taHty. The workers are rtrik
ing for higher wages and for
recognition (of their union.
More than 15,000
strike in ''he ehffre state.
were ar.
are out on
Lani er *and he
wished to give
Dickey county the opportunity of
subscribing $1,000 to the fund,
statin S several counties and
towns had already done so. Among
those were Jamestown and Minot,
The biter subscribed 51,000 de
spite the fact it will receive r.o
dirert benefits the project
SÄ'nSSa ^ * "" "
The LaMaUre county emission
J"!? 0 had , been Ju
° thlS canfab » rese ^ed their de
* 5 ™ dl °* atlon ' whlle the
Dl . ck y c ? un *? commissioners pro
miSed ° nIy their moraI snpport -
Personally I think our best bet
to, force the commissioners and the
town and city councils to use their.
slusb funds in feeding the destl
tu e. If we dm't have diversion
P r °i e cts without diverting most of
* be funds into grafting and racke
teering charnels, then we had bet
ter P aSs ft up until after the revo
latÎOT1 - w e can build dam sites a
^smned sieht cheaper when graft
* nf " and chiseling ha? been efimi
,r a x ed. In t v e meantime. let us
e ^ up of this surplus. Ger.
„rd-, 59 ™ter. „il, (or ft „
^ »■' « make >e m de «-dent
tor^t *hat.
IRON AGE BUTTER,
MADE 2700 YEARS
AGO, IS STILL GOOD
Berlin, July 19. —Hazelnut but
ter 2, »00 years old and still in a
good condition was the Grchaeo
Jogical find recently examined by
Professor Dr. Johannes Giuss ol'
Berlin- Rahnsdorf.
The material, as described by
Professor Gruss,
lumps about the size of plums,
found) with the remains of a mm
of the Iron Age, about 800 B. C.,
in a grave near, the town of But
lirgen. The body had been cre
j mated before burial, and ihe urr
containing the Khzelnut butter was
in the fire. This thoroughly steri
1 lizedi the earthen vessel and its
sealed-in contents, coating 'he fat
with a carbonized layer that
; stitoted a fécond protective
ering.
Consequently in »-IT the centuries
bacteria and! fungi had been iw
able to penetrate to the fat arc
spoil it. It was identified as hazel
con
cov
^
1 nutshell embedded in it.
i
i
!

' , ,
Labor Defense Rallying
| Mass Pressure to
Obtain Release
DEMAND JOBLESS
WORKER'S PARDON
. w.. . . ,
Iwaukee, Wis., Aug. 6.—A j
year or more ago, on July 27, 1932
Joe Hawkins ^ militant worker i
from Milwaukee participated in a i
, w! !
. Fond du Lac ave., to demand re
^ or ne ©dy families. While Joe
Hawkins generally made himself
useful in such cases, and wiis pre
v ' ous iy successful in securing an
au dien ce with relief officials, he
" as ibis time met witr organized
°PP° s itioin of the police,
® ur bank, father of 8 whose
v ® be taken up was at'acked
within the relief station, there
crowds gathered and the
store front window at the
reH «f station was cn-shed from
: the impact of the crowds outside.
® AWKI ^ REARRESTED
! ^ Wer 5
TÏj™? W6re freed ' Burback
1 to 7^2 Were /' ven 3b days
■ Î?® ,?° Use o£ Correction by
the *****
Fred
case
wa s
^ ? f
Upon ' Hawkins Ä he
**"*"?* t0 anaW f r " a
Ï. 1?.^ wlth I Î*
5^ *1 S ^~
»-ughnesse found him guilty,on
two counts sentencing him from 1
to 3 years on two counts (mean-j
ing 2 to 6 years) to the State;
prison at Waupun, and he was
I 1 .ter moved to the State Prison
Camp at Goddon, Wis., where he
still remains.
Hawkins has a wife and' three
children, who are without support.
was re
CASE UP ON SEPT. 6
On September 6 the case of Haw
kirçs will come up before the IVr
don Board at Madison. The case
has been handled' by the Interna
tional Labor Defense, who
vinced that the man is innocent
and has been framed up. They
request that all labor organiza
tions concern themselves with the
immediate and unconditional re
lease of Joe Hawkins. Failure to
secure pardon means a likelihood
that the man will have to serve
his full term from 2 to 6 years.
Petitions and resolutions have
been sent in to 'Governor Schmede
Trpn from all parts if the state,
and from more distant points,
» r d there should be no let up.
• • •
Any one desiring to correspond
with Joe Hawkins, to help lighten
his term, can do so, by adddessing
him at Gordon, Wisconsin, State
Prison Camp,
are con
TWO BIRDS INDICTED FOR RACKETEERING
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B I HI
Cn the left we have Aaron Sapiro and on the right
Dr. Benjamin Squires, who have been recently indicted
for racketeering in the dying and cleaning industry in
Chicago. Sapiro became notorious for
organizing co
operatives in California, Minnesota and elsewhere which
were going to provide the farmers' salvation. The only
thing they provided, however, were fat fees for Sapiro.
Later he used the fact that he is a Jew for high-jacking
Henry Ford out of some cash, during the anti-Semitic
campaign conducted by the latter:
Squires used to be professor of economics at the
University of Chicago. He made a reputation for him
self as an "impartial chairman" among the Chicago
trade unions. The tricks he learned there from the
actionary union leaders he turned to good account and
his present indictment is the result.
re
Mortgage Companies
of N. Y. In Big Crash
NEW DEAL ADMINISTRATION IN NEW YORK IN
SISTS SMALL HOME OWNERS MUST PAY
INTEREST AND TAXES
I
,
1
)
New York, Aug. 14.—Eight of the lar gest title and mort
gage companies and two insurance companies which have
been bankrupted by the crisis have been taken over by the
State Superintendent of Insurance, George S. VanSchaick,
in one of the worst crashes of the present crisis. The liabili
ties of the title companies total $2,227,500,000 consisting of
outstanding mortgage guarantees against which they have
assets of only
The companies taken over I'.de
he following:
Bond' and Mortgage Guarantee
Co., Brooklyn; liabilities $835,000,
000; assets, $47,000,000.
New York Title and Mortgage
Co., labilities, $523,000,00-0; assets
$70,769,550.
Home Title Insurance Co., lia
bilities, $56,000,000; assets $5,340
000 .
Lawyers Mortgage Co., New
York; liabilities, $366.000,000;
sets $26,492.000.
S'ate Title and Mortgage Co.
New York; liabilities $63.000,000;
assets $14.500,000.
National Title Guaranty Co.
Brooklyn; liabilities $31,500,000;
assets $6.600 000.
a.=
Union Guarantee and Mortgage
FORCED REMOVAL
CHILD'S EYE, CAN
- ÇTADVC I TMlIiriVr
U 1 All Y Li DD) jq P, I £
v Hastings -on.Hudson, Nnw j
ioi'k, Aug. 6—Last winter the
capitalist papers carried col
umn-long stories when John
Vasco was forced by court
der to permit the removal of
eye of his daughter, two
year-old Helen, to save her
life.
or
one
"Everybody was interested
Ä
cares," said Vasco. "I Have
bo job, I get $5 a week relief,
rent. You
see, Helen has n 0 glass eye
yet. I hink maybe she ought
to have one. But we have no
money.,"
Mrs. Vasco refused to be (n.
terviewed by the capitalist
press which was so interested
in saving Helen's life by bar- ,
ing her eye removed but would
tet ''Ke entire family starve to
d ^V:. ifhOUt a word -
Helen s eye was "news." j
deaith is reaI !
"news" m capitalist America, j
BROWN SHIRTS ARE
RED UNDERNEATH IS
WRITER'S VERDICT
The Hitler regime is menaced
not by any external enemy, either
m the country or outeide, but by
the danger of an internal explo
sion," i s the verdict of Anre Me- \
TIP _r i!ïr COTre - L
sponcent m ^Hin. "New and ;
more d™«!» decrees . . . . *Jat
hf ;
coJe^SÄ ,,, W5Wrte thk
numy Bmwn
SWts ane t ike one this writer
^^e and rod
The working people who were
fooled into support g Hitler rire
learning that It is 'red' .action that
wij wm +hem relief and not Hit
tor's parades and circuses.
j
Co., New York; liabilities $30,000
000; assets $4,077,000.
First Mortgage Guaranty and
Title Co. New Rochelle; liabilities;
$10,500,000; assets, $3,147.000.
The insurance companies taken
over were:
Lloyds Insurance Company of
America, frozen assets of $8,000,
000 and liabilities of $5,000,000
and its affiliated
company.
General Indemnity Corp. frozen
assets of $3,000,000 and liabilities
of $2,000,000.
LARGEST IN COUNTRY
The first mentioned
company
the Bond and Mortgage Co. is
the largest company of Its
kind in the country. This is
one indication of tihe omport
arice of the collapse of this
part of Wall Street's financial
structure.
86881011 of legislature ha s sHited
that the small home owner can ex
pect no mercy as a result of this
°'
He advised that mortgage
owners if mortgaged property
should be protected from fore
closure until May 1, 1934—
"PROVIDING TAXES AND
INTEREST
CHARGES HAVE BEEN
PAID."
AND OTHER
_. N0REA h L
e 1 v mean e absolutely no relief
lu! the ff? 11 home <™ n ers. If
they <» uld h^e *nd their taxes
.
^ irterest 111(1 other charges the
|ü^ ranc f. c °U panies would have
We satisfied to renew their
mortgagee. But they have not
to pay taxes and i^ter
€St ' Cjr0vernor Lehman's relief is
^ more thpn so many words,
S "P® riT ^ en<1,en t of Insurance Van
™ ade Governor Leb
s statemen t more clear.
"Interest and principal pay
ments must be collected; fore
closure Proceedings must be
i net Hated when necessary
and some agency must see to
« that taxes are paid" he de
clared.
This is necessary for the
protection of mortgage guar
«"tj and certificate holders,
«dated Van Schaick. in order
that there be
'**■ " thi s light that we must
tmderstandi Roosevelt's derlnrafton
his Hyde P^rt eummerTome
5"-»a "i
b f k T upt companies by Pro
K A - member of his
T>ram trust"; Pobe^ Moses for
mer Secretary of the State (New
York) a nd Dr. Henry Moskowitz.
99
no doubt as to
purpose of "reo^,.
zation."
!hc
TJ»«* Roosevelt agents will
7 0rk *a conjunction wWi the
haafcers and mortgage holders
to clean out the small owtiers
of *11 they
I
R
oo
I W Wo
r ■
bt.
.Ski
V.
Outlaw Demonstration in
British Guiana
Georgetown, British Guiana, Aug. 2>
der to prevent a working cla*s demonst
the eight-hour day the
proclamation forbidding .all
demonstrations.
—In
0L
nation fo»
government h aa lss ^°^
m eetingj,
mass
»nd
Ballx) , » Flight Preparation
for War
PariA Augu« 20. —''Italian a,ia tio , .
not directed toward pacific ends, it does
aim for commercial conquests. Mused«;
does not disguise tha, hi s aviation
tially military." declare» the French goven,
merit paper. I'Ere Nouvell, in commenting «.
he flight of the fascist Balbo to the U «
with 24 seaplanes. "Group flights
the Italians have achieved . . . have an essen,
tially military charac er," comments le Jour
nale. "The results ob arned by General Balbo'
squadron make it easy to imagine aerial ar"
madae crossing oceans and Participating hi
major naval engagements in the next
nt*:
essen.
such
as
war."
Japanese Destroy City
of 20,000
Peiping, Aug. 21.—Dolon No r in r
Province, 180 miles north of this city b-s b™,
raptured by the Japanese. The city „h,* ZÎ
had a population of 20,000 has been bombai
repeatedly by L the Japanese and a „„„
mass of ruins, * ' 4
Uruguay Will Establish Embassy
in U. S. S. R.
Moscow, Aug. 24—Alberto Manet FW
Minister of Uruguay, has informed £ S
government of the decision of his
t €srtablish an embassy a: Moscow,
j post£ to conclude
viet Union.
government to
He also pro.
a trace agreement with the So.
The Soviet government i
j these proposals ami is ready to
nas accepted
enter
for a trade agreement.
fiegotiatioBS
Unemployed Defend Subsiste
Against Police
nee
Warsaw, AugT 19.-Durir.g the last few
the police with the cooperation of the mine own
ers have destroyed three "mkery pits" (ehe mime
given to idle p i ts used by i(he ariem pi oyed ^
the Ir * 0st Primitive tools). When the police pre.
pared to dynamite .he fourth pit the unemployed
resisted, in order to prevert their last means of
subsistence from being swept aw-ay. In sp j te 0 f
the commands of the police the unemployed ro!
mained in the pit.
dajs
Hitler Is Agent of Big Business
Berlin, Aug. 21.— The German Mining Jour.
n.al writes, "The fate of the employers, in their
free economic development is bound up for better
or worse with tb e maintenance of the national
government. Therefore,
every political
ment aiming at the removal of the national (fas
cist—Ed.) government strikes at th e same time at
the employers.
move
Swedish Sailors Refuse to Obey
Stockholm, Aug. 22.—At the Swedish r.avsl
nose Karlskona 90 sailors recently refused to drill
until they had received better food.
In spite of
all threats they continued to strike until promised
that their demands would be
time 400 recruit* refused to drill for the
met. At the îame
same
reason.
Soviets Hire U. S. Hospital
Expert
New York, Aug. 16.— Dr. S. S. Golcwater,
hospital consultant and former Commissiorer of
Health of New York City, has been appointed
consulting hospital expert by the Soviet govern
ment.
He expects to collaborate with Soviet
architects,
pla nring of hospitals in Leningrad, also else
where.
engineers and clinicians in the
British Monopoly Will Fight for
Shipping
London, Aug. 20.—The amalgamation of
the Cunard and White Star lines is expected to
be
announced in the next few days. This amalga
mation of Great Britain.' s two biggest lines Is be
ing carried out in order to conduct a more intensi
fied struggle against the U. S., German, French,
and Italian shipping.
12,000 Welsh Miners Strike
London, Aug. 13.—Twelve thousand men Q"* 1
work ip the Welsh coal mines today. It b
pected that the strike will spread to include ai
of the 17,000 men employed by the Amalgamated
Anthracite Collieries, Ltd., which control SO p* r
cent of the anthracite output in South Wales.
Murder 100 Peasants in Cuba
New York.—Mor e than 100 peasants wert
murdered in the Santa Clara region by the
ado Rural Guards, in the first three weeks
July. They were murdered on »suspicion that they
were helping the struggle against the Machad®
regime. Hundreds of peasant hu:s have ^
burned by the same terrorist bands.
150,000 Chinese Made Homelesi
By Floods
Shangnai, Aug. 24.—More than 160,000
are homeless and destitute as a result of
of the Yellow River in Honan and Hupei Py° v î^
More than twice that number are destitute in ^
lung province. For seventy miles no land is
ble. Thousands have been lost in the floods
French Tariff Raised
Paris, Aug. 9.—Tariff increases
300 per cent went into effect today on
and substances and seeds. This will cut
American exports further.
10 t®
from
fatty ftfj*
into

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