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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, September 01, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, Image 1

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OF MONTANA.
HELENA
V
THE PRODUCERS NEWS
cv FRY FARMER SHOULD
READ IT
GLAD TO GET SUBS
It is the best I have seen
since the days of the old
Appeal and the Rip Saw,
writes B. P. Zuver of Em
mons county, North Dakota.
Will be only too glad to send
some subs.
a
News should
"The Producers
in the hand« of every
former." says Roy Anderson.
Aitkin county, Minn.
99
C t
of
99
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
PLENTYWOOD, SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1933
VOL. XVI. Number 23
Published WeeUy.
ers' Relief Election
production of Pork for
Year to be Cut 1,800,000,000
Under New Deal Hunger
NEW DEAL IN PORK MEANS STABILIZING STAR
VATION FOR WORKING PEOPLE JUST AS
THROUGH WHEAT ACREAGE CUT
Pork Sales Tax Will Reduce Consumption
Farmers Forced to Market Hogs Through Lack of Feed;
Sales Tax at Expense of Working People Will
Mean New Slump in Mass Consumption
MeatPacking Trust Will Run Program
Washington, Aug. 29.—The New Deal for the corn-hog
farmers went into effect on Aug. 23 when the federal hog
buying program was started in six middlewestem livestock
centers. Other terminals and markets were opened up for
federal hog buying on Aug. 28.
The Agricultural Adjustment Administration plan calls for the
Imyirg of a maximum of 4,000,000 pigs between 25 and 100 pounds
and 1,000,000 fows, weighing not less than 275 pounds. This
holde good until the 6,000,000 pigs and
pro
gram
chased or until Oct. 1.
Ä
my heavy receipts of pigs weigh
ing lees than 80 pounds were re- '
ceivtd at the first six terminal
pitots to go into the buying pro
T" 1 AS . t a'P i' I" 5 *'*
these points had to be closed down
from Aug. 25 to Aug. 28,
TO WASTE 1,209,000,000
POUNDS OF PORK
The new dealers estimate that j
the supply of hog 3 being marketed
during the fall and winter markets
will be reduced by between six
hundred and seven hundred million
pounds of live pork through the
operations of the program. The
«laughter of pigs and hogs which
mild be fattened up and of sows
which are a po f ential source of
■ innort o». Twn)
!
i
B5g Pay Farm Leader
Supports Allotment Plan
Four years ago, Charlie Talbot,
the $5,000 per year state president
of the North Dakota Farmers
Union, went into every farming
community in North Dakota, pro
claiming and acclaiming the "Farm
Board Act," just passed by the Re
publican Congress and signed by
the Great Engineer Hoover as the
salvation of the American farmer.
The Farm Board and the Coop
eratives it wa^ sponsoring, and
pegged pr ice for wheat, would
solve under capitalism, the prob
lems of the farmers; get him "cost
of production plus a fair profit"
for his grain and cattle, and thus
wing him prosperity.
Talbot indirectly appreciated
Hoover and thhe Republican ad
ministration, and lauded Alexan
der Legge to the skies, telling the
farmers with great confidence and
intimately, that tho Legge
fcnd of the International Harves-.
ter Company, a J. P. Morgan con
TMw * Ct h - e Was alright ' for his
s ' wife had S° ne to school
«jether with him in the same
^hool house, and she knew
n®t Legg e wap the farmers friend
was
j
*nd the man who would bring him
Prosperity, a r d that Legge being j
"' the farm machinery manufac
^fing game, he wag interested In
e farmer? making money so that
ttsy could pay him.
North Dakota farmers
this lin e well.
remem
SUBSIDIZED LEADERSHIP
Several of the high priced
^ I "°' n löaders were ap
i p ed to government jobs with
, nes of $6,000 to $20,000
year attached.
per
Free. Talbot him
w as subsidized if not directly
^ dlrect ly, as wer e many
* her "farm leaders."
TV "Farm Board
bx be
self
than
Act" proved
- a " an kers and ft peculators
l U8t as the Producers
said it
Passed,
told the
was when the act
But Charlie Talbot
farmers the Producers
was wrong. He eaid that
arm Board Act was in fact a
'- honest, Farm Relief Act-a
wt that
farmers.
was right and the
was It did
1W, fanners: It relieved
tVey had left the
W. TV !t •'Yrifc'ved" the
' Qf > !t to the bankers
would "relieve" the
sows have been
•— -—
FLYING BOAT
* Washington, Aug. 19.— A new *
• Hying boat An- war service is •
being tried out under service •
#
* Type P2-Y2 has superior sea- *
* worthy qualifies, enabling it *
♦ aIM { take off in rough •
♦ water,
( * knots fasXer than existing *
! * models. •
* , t ^ mh racks ^ *
* equipp€rf witll machine guns. •
pur
BEING TRIED OUT
conditions a;, Anacostia, near *
* here, for the Navy Depart- *
* ItttRt,
The plain« which is called *

It is from 10 to 15 *
1
a
!
1
i
j
'
i
and speculators and business me"
' STABALIZED STARVATION
j T h e administration changed and
' Hoover left office the most
j
CHARLES C. TALBOT
%
m
ééMeâs;
',
«Tig
un
(Contlnued on last page)
United Mass Pressure Frees S. Dak. Jobless Leader
*
WITHOUT LAWYER, TRIAL BONDS
FARMERS RALLY UNDER U. F. L. TO WIN FREE
DOM FOR SOUTH DAKOTA UNEM
PLOYED ORGANIZER
Seidler Faces Two More Charges
Mayor Promises New Relief Arrangements Will Be
Made; Organizer Was Arrested on Orders From
Politicians Grafting off of Relief
(BY J. M. AND J. S.)
Mitchell, S. D., Aug. 21.—Returning from a committee
meeting of the Davison County Labor League, on Aug. 19,
Paul Seidler, state organizer of the Unemployed Councils,
was arrested on the streets and taken off to jail. On Thurs
day night Seidler had addressed the local Unemployed
League here, presenting a pro gram of militant action of re
posure due to their grafting
It is said that certain poli- off of the unemployed. Hence
tlcians are afraid of an ex- Seidler's arrest.
Coming
lbs.
Program
MONT. FARMERS
FORCE RELEASE
OF CROP. STOCK
I
"
Bankers Agents Attempt
to Victimize Militant
Holiday Leader
(BY M. 0.)
Geyser, Mont., Aug. 24.—
On Tuesday, Aug. 22, about
200 farmers, members of the
Judith Basin County Holiday
Assn, intervened in the sher
iff sale proceeding of a wind-,
ham, Mont., elevator against
John Clark, a farmer.
Th® sheriff had seized Clark's
herd of milk cows and moved
them about 10 miles, depriving
Clark and his ^family of their
livelihood. In spite of a cold rain
and muddy roads farmer« from
all parts of the county gathered at
the seen« and through an elected
Committee of Action compelled
the elevator manager to let Clark
keep five cows and this year's
crop in order to give Clark and
his family a chance to exist.
lh * ?f lan ^ e ,, of the C ° W3 w f. re .
. PTO . C !^1LT k!
the parties interested.*
John Clark is the secretary of
the Holiday Assn, and was active
behalf of another farmer and
doubt thus drew the wrath ofj
the creditors on his^own head.
Thanks to the solidarity of farm-;
ers this was one occasion where
an active and militant farmer was
not sacrificed for his courageous
action for others.
This is the first time the Holi
day Assn, of this county hag been
in action since it was organized in
March of this year.
on
no
HOG PROGRAM TO
AID MEAT TRUST
|
Processing Tax on Hogs
Will Cut Out Small
Producers
(BY E. P.)
Hecla, S. D., Aug. 30.—A farm
er who has been selling pork in
town the last few winters reports
that he will not try it this coming
winter if the proposed processing
tax on hogs goes into effect. He
says people will not be able to buy
pork here at the increased prices.
It is said that the red tape con
j nected with the processing tax is
j going to make it practically im
! possible for small processors to
j continue in business showing that
there may be a good deal of truth
in the charge that one purpose of
NRA is to squeeze out small
i businesses "Little fish for the
big fish."
Farmers in North Dakota
Demand Governor Langer
Explain His War Speech
I
We farmers and workers assembled at Hettinger, N. D.
for the purpose of discussing the unemployment and farm
situation in this county. In our conversation we brought up
f° r discussion the speech you made at North Dakota Farm
ers Holiday Association's first annual convention in the
pavilion at Lakewood Park, Devils Lake, N. Dak., on June
29, wherein you are accused of having made the statement 1
that you promised Roosevelt at the conference of governors
kt the White House on March 6, that your state would lead
Hettinger, N. D,
August 21, 1933
Mr. W. M. Langer
Bismarck, N. Dak.
Deal* Governor:
all other states in all Red Cross contributions and the pur
chasing of war bonds, and that North Dakota would lead all
other states in furnishing their quota of young men to fight
the nation's war, whether the country was right or wrong.
What is this all about? Are we about to enter into an
other war? Did you governors discuss the possibilities of
another war with the President? If so, why are we going
into another war? Is Roosevelt sending these young men
out under false pretense to plant trees with the intention of
preparing them for war? Did any of you governors try to
Actively on the front _
Are you governors going to be where the bullets fly, or are
you going to be in your mansions with the National Guards
around protecting you ?
j

I We want peace happiness and something to eat. Fur
j thermore we are still paying for the last war, and you will
j well remember the suffering, heartaches and bloodshed
"used by that war. I lost the only brother I had in the.
world in the last war. and yet no one could ever tell mel
"hat we tought for, only for the financial benefit of a few. I
And still you would pledge yourselves to lead all other states
I in quotas of young men to enlist in another war to go and
be slaughtered on the battlefields for the interest of Wall
Street, even though you know your country was wrong!
Or were you all so patriotic that
discourage another war?
you pledged yourselves to Roosevelt that when war does
break out, you will be the first ones to enlist and to serve
How many of you made that pledge?
We farmers and workers don't want war!
You also know the enormous amount of money now
spent for modem war equipment. The last war was only
kid's play to what the next war will be!
Most of us supported you in the last election, and we are
looking for a reply and an explanation as to what you mean
■by such a pledge.
Yours truly,
MATT HAUGEN.
WAR AGAINST SOVIET
UNION ADMITTED AS
ALM OF FASCISM
Danzig, Aug. 29.—Dr. Ros
enberg, Hitler's "private for
eign minister" today reinewed
the war cry against the Soviet
Union in a speech before the
German Labor Front. He re
peated the war program pro
claimed by Hugenberg at the
London Economic Conference
—against "Africa and Asia."
"Our mission," said Rosen
berg "is to be the pioneers in
the battle of the wMte men
against advancing Africa and
attacking Asia . . . That is the
new Germany."
The aim» of imperialist Ger
many Under Hitler are the en
slavemént of the workisg peo
ple of Africa and Asia— re
capture of the former Ger
man colonies in Africa and the
division of (he Soviet Union.
As the officer and Sediler passed
down the street numbers of the
unemployed fell into line and fol
lowed them to the City Hall.
Within a 'minute a large crowd
had gathered in the City Hall and
on the lawn in front of the build
ing demanding the immediate re
lease of the prisoner.
UFL FARMERS STAND BY
UNEMPLOYED
The farmers who have just been
organized into the United Farmers
League were notified of the arr
raet. They came into town and
together with the unemployed
workers demanded his release.
After some time the crowd was
informed that Seidler was being
held on a vagrancy charge and
would bé given a hearing the next
morning at 9 o'clo<k. The news
of the arrest soon spread among
the workers thruout the city and
Into the territory. Agitated and
excited groups of workers gath
ered about the streets and discus
sed the matter l%te Into the eve
nfng.
WORKERS CANT
BUY FARM CROP
(By a Fanner)
Lake Elmo, Minn., Aug. 21.-A
few days ago we questioned Mrs.
Metzger, Rural route New
crop S™"aid'"WdhareVftoeorganize
lop Of amleV thiHear but it la
s 0 °hard Ä Tm y We
the St. Paul City Market, paid 36
cents market fee, and wo did not,
sell 36 cents worth of apples. The
working people have no money, so
they cannot buy. One thing i s in
our favor, we can feed them to
the hogs.
! w rjf.rs
Minn. Farmer Feeds Fine
Apple Crop to Hogs,
Workers Without
Telegrams were dispatched to
Goy. Berry by the Unemployed
Council protesting against this in
vasion of civil rights on> the part
of the police of this city. The In
ternational Labor Defense in all
parts of the state wired to the
governor and to the mayor of
Mitchell.
LAWYER BACKS OUT
The workers and fanners visited
the Chamber of Commerce, the
County Commissioners, demanding
Seidleria release. Benson, a local
lawyer was secured, but when the
police informed Benson that they
had found some kind of "red"
cards on Seidler, he backed out.
Nine o'clock Saturday morning
found the workers and farmers
streaming toward the city hall.
When it was announced that the
court had postponed the case un
til Monday the crowd became more
indignant than ever and began
clamoring for the immediate and
unconditional release of Seidler.
officials, of Hie
oners, and relief
Group® of
county comm
dty
issl<
NORTH DAKOTA FARMERS AND
WORKERS VOTE ON SALES TAX
AND BEER ON SEPTEMBER 22
J® tbe revolutionary actions in
Gal Tne n ™hei of police
n 'u™ eiTr ™ ot are
iug made throughout the entire
district. The prisons are crowded
wi'h nrrested peasants and even
army barracks are being used
since the prisons are too crowded.
Official reports str.te that 'peace'
has been entirely restored in Ga
laci-a, but in r eality the peasants
are still organizi r g to defend
themselves against the govern
ment nnd i's punitive expeditions.
FORTY PEASANTS IN
POLAND MURDERED:
PRISONS ARE FULL
Waieaw, Aug. 22. —Recent re
ports indicate that 40 peasants
were killed by government forces
BREAD QUALITY
BEING LOWERED
Roosevelt Administration
Admits Tendency to New
Price Raising Scheme
Washington, Aug. 27.—
Lowering the quality of the
bread is the new program by
which the bread trust is at
tempting to raise the price to
the working people. This has
become so serious that the
Roosevelt administration has
been forced to mention it.
Already there seems to be
a tendency on the part of
some stores to discontinue
higher priced brands and
substitute lower priced ones,
j said Dr. Howe of the Agricul
j tural Adjustment Admini
'
il
» »
"This substitution suggests
1 the introduction of poorer
quality—a form of profiteer
ing as injurious to consumers
as unreasonable price In
creases.
j pie in St. Paul pay 8 and 9 cents
j a quart. The middlemen get the
; largest part of the 9 cents. Reno's
I Holiday was called off for 90
Jmd we let* notiere foreur
,,
j unless the farmers and workers
and put up a United
1 T, 1 wd P u P uPPP
wUtol^mra 1 United tZfZ
Sh wp fall Wp u* !T' dirt
! fermera to loin the United Fan,.-!on
• erg get up your <ywn dirt
; f armer officers and keep out law
j yers doctors, preachers, and the
merchants. Let's go. '
-—
99
organization officials were gath
ered in the different parts of the
City Hall. Groups of workers and
farmers argued with officials,
while others milled around the
building. When County Commis
sioner Webb caw the mass of the
farmers and workers behind Seid
ler backing up Seidler he said, "It
a mistake to arrest that
was
man. 1
AGREE TO GELANGE RELIEF
About the middle of the after
noon the crowd was asked to
gather in the main hall where it
was then addressed by Mayor
Frederick, Judge Danforth and
Walter Webb. They thought they
would release Seidler, and agreed
that they would have a commit
tee meet a committee appointed by
the Davison County Labor League
at which meeting they agreed to
draw up a new plan for the hand
ling of the county relief.
At 5 p. m. the Mayor, accom
panied by Barth, Secretary of the
fecal Unemployed League, went to
Seidler at his cell, to release him.
25
Per Cent to Schools;
75 Per Cent to Bankers
Under Camouflage of Raising Funds to Provide Schools
for Children in Destitute Districts, Bankers Would Put
Over "Sales Tax" to Wring Money From Impover
ished Farmers and Unemployed Workers to Pay In
terest and Principle on State "Real Estate Bonds
7 Measures Will Be Submitted
Sales Tax, Beer, Bank Receiver, Workman's Compensa
tion Bureau, Sunday Movie Bills, the 5 Referred and
Initiated Measures; Concurrent Resolutions Regard
ing Elections and Terms of County Officers and Read
ing Bill in Legislature, the 2 Constitutional Amend
ments
"Saies Tax" Unmasks Gov,
Langer as the Bankers' Man
Beer Measure" Yoked With "Sales Tax" in Slick
Scheme to Slip Bankers Relief Measure Onto the Back
of the Consumers, Unnoticed, in Hi-hoo-ray Beer
Campaign in Which Voters Will Be Told to Vole
Yes" on All Bills
<<
u
Bismarck, North Dakota
August 50, 1933
Special to the Producers News.
The conspiracy of the bankers and bondholders of Wall
Street to fasten the Sales Tax on the back of of the impov
erished farmers and destitute workers of North Dakota pro
ceeds apace. I
Gov. Langer, Saturday afternoon, August 12, affixed
his signature to a proclamation ordering a Special Elec
tion in North Dakota, Friday, September 22, to vote on
the Sales Tax Bill, introduced in the Legislature at Bis
marck during the closing days of the Session last winter
by Sen. Erickson of Kidder county at the Governor's
behest, and jammed thru the House during the clos
ing hours under the Governor's lash in the form of a
circular threatening to call a Special Session if the
Bankers Bill were not passed, and promptly signed by
but held up until passed by the voters at a special
or genera i election held thruout the state, by the imme
diate ffli of petitions by the people under the Refer
«•*"» Act - T ' an « er ' s Proclamation provided the special
election.
The Sales Tax Bill plovides for a tax on practically all
sales of from one . e ighth of a cent to two cents on each dol
lar. Seventy-five cents of each dollar raised by this tax goes
to the bankers and rich holders of the North Dakota Real
Estate Bonds in payment of interest and principle; 25 cents
each dollar goes into the State Equalization Fund, which
is used to maintain the schools of the state,
The 25 per cent for the destitute school districts, is the
camouflage under which the Sales Tax is being foisted upon
the people for the benefit of the Wall Street bankers who are
the sponsors of the Bill, and for whose benefit it is being
.... b, a.,.™, u.»,
SEIDLER SPEAKS AFTER
RELEASE
Upon his release Saldier spoke
250 workers ahd farmers wait
ing for his release, outside of the
bastille. Seidler pointed out that
"it is always the boss class that
starts violence against the work
ers and farmers."
Without a lawyer. Without
bonds or a trial, Seidler wa« re
leased beta—e af the
in
digitation and pressure of the
workers and farmers.
Paul Seidler is awaiting trial on
two charge«, in Aberdeen next
month, arising out of the strike of
relief workers in July. He is
charged with "s
permit" and " d
This latter charge Is based the
fact, that when Seidler was ar
rested, be was caught talking to
two strikers on the street. He is
out on a $100 bond, furnished by
two farmers, Martin Tveit and
John Sumption of the United
Farmers League.
without a
g traffic."
on rage
PROTEST!
The Starte Conference ol the
United Farmers League in
Washington, which was to have
taken {dace ob Aug. 26 and 27
has been smashed by the mi
litia and other forces of "law
and order" under the NEW
DEAL.
The U. F. L. Conference was
smashed because the bankers
realized the ÜFL would build a
United Front of the impover
ished farmers with the agricul
tural workerg against exploit
ers of both groups.
Casey Boskaljon, State Orga
nizer of the United Farmers
League, is reported held in
Soil* ary confinement,
old Brockway, another militant
UFL organizer, < 8 also reported
In Jail.
Demand the immediate re
lease of Boskaljon hnd Brock
way and all other farmers who
have heeb arrested. Wire your
protests to OWTTwr C. Mari in
at Olympia. Wasfönrton and
t« Dhe Sheriff at Yakima. Wash.
Watch for the complete storv
of i*Ms terrorist^ In nekt week's
Producers News.
Har-

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