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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, September 01, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, Image 2

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
Published weekly at Plenty wood, Montana, by
The Peoples Publishing Company, Inc.
Entered as Second Close Matter. October 18, 1918, at the
Poet Office at Plentywood, Montana, Under the Act of March
9, 1879.
Official Organ of the
UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
National Headquarter», 1629 Linden Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn.
4f--t
j? u
Official paper of the City of Plentywood, Montana
Subscription Rates: National or County Edition—I n the
United States: per year, $2; six months, $1; three months,
60 cents. Foreign per year $2.50; six months, $1.25; three
months, 60 cents.
Advertising Rates furnished upon application.
ERIK BERT, Editor
CHARLES E. TAYLOR, Managing Editor
HANS RASMUSSEN. Business Manager
Friday, September 1, 1933
Why the New Deal?
The Agricultural Adjustment Act is proving to be a
source of new HOPE for millions engaged in this Nation's
farming industry," proclaimed the Roosevelt administration
Aug. 24 in a broadside issued to the press.
About the actual accomplishments of the Act they say
little—because there is NOTHING to say. They dribble a
little about the "production adjustment programs for cotton,
tobacco, wheat, hogs, and milk" that have "already been put
into effect" and from which, reputedly "millions of dollars
are flowing into the hands of the country's farmers.
Reports from fanners to their paper, th e Producers
News (much of which we have not yet been able to print)
indicate that the New Deal, in the words of these farmers
themselves is a "raw deal" or a "rotten deal." The market
for his goods is contracting, prices RECEIVED BY THE
44
on
9f
FARMERS for farm products are at best barely keeping
pace with the higher prices of what he has to buy, leav
ing him in the same position he was months ago. The need
for cash relief is becoming more widespread, medical aid is
a dire necessity in practically every farming community,
collectors congregate in the small town hotels like the grass
hoppers in our gardens and fields this summer, running
out each morning to get their fill for the bankers.
But the Roosevelt administration speaks the truth when
it declares that its program gave the farmers "HOPE.
Through a publicity campaign, unequalled since the
world war, the Roosevelt administration has been pouring
out hope (or hop) throughout the American countryside.
Why ha» it done this?
No better answer to the aims of the Roosevelt new deal
can be found than by the words of George N. Peek, ex-farm
machine manufacturer and at present parading under the
grandiloquent title of "Administrator of the Agricultural
Adjustment Act," in a speech to the grain gamblerrs, in
Washington on August 9.
Peek declared without much ado that the purpose of
the New Deal was to maintain the capitalist system of ex
ploitation.
99
"1 am interested primarily in preserving the social
order ander which we have all grown up and prospered
to a greater or less degree," declared Peek.
He neglected only to add that he and his kind have
prospered to a GREATER DEGREE and we and our kind
have prospered to a LESS DEGREE. So much less in fact
that, after our parents have slaved a lifetime, after we have
slaved the best part of our lives, and our children are learn
ing to slave, WE NOW FACE THE LOSS OF OUR HOMES
AND LAND. WE MUST FIGHT FOR RELIEF AND
MEDICAL AID SO THAT WE CAN LIVE.
Mr. Peek realizes this CLASS difference between the
"greater" and "less" that the ruling and owning class pios
pered to a "greater degree" and the working class eristed
"less
Mr. Peek realizes, further, that the
*>
a degree,
fanners are thinking deeply about this lesson in history
and economics and are drawing conclusions from it.
With the number of strikes all over the coun
try, the coal strike in Pennsylvania, the milk strike in
New York, the lumber strike thruout the entire lumber
region, and others if you (talking to the grain gamblers,
mind you—Ed.) don't keep the farmer conservative,
then he is goiig with the OTHER CROWD. He isn't
going to stand still and he dispossessed of his home and
his property through no fault of his own.
It is in the interest of the Nation (to be truth
ful, should have said Wall Street—Ed.) that everything
that can be done shall be done to keep him conservative.
He is not going to remain so under conditions such as
have existed during the last few years.
44
«
The present system of society has robbed hundreds of
thousands of their homes and threatens the remainder of the
impoverished farmers with the loss of their homes and land.
This system is driving us ever deeper into the bog of desti
tution and misery.
In the face of this the New Deal, and Mr. Peek, and
Wall Street would like to have us "conservative,
struggles throughout the American countryside during the
past year have shown that this "conservatism" is shaken.
The farmers have taken to action because action brings re
sults.

The
The New Deal wants us to HOPE that the leopard wil
change his spots—that this system of plunder and war wil
bring prosperity and peace.
Each day's news brings further evidence that we are
driving toward a much sharper period of crisis and towarc
imperialist war.
Mr^Peek feels that we will take up with bad company
unless they can make us HOPE. He told the speculators
and swindlers we would go with the "other crowd." Who is
this "other crowd?"
The "other crowd" is the most militant employed and
unemployed workers in the cities. These are our brothers
in the factories, in the soup Unes, in the mines and mills
This is the city working dass— It la the proletariat.
.V " oth ! r crowd"—not Mr. Peek's crowd—
îl*î gS? d î- by .JP. In . S «at fights side by
side with us, that pickets with ua on the strike lines.
PLAN CUT IN PORK PRODUCTION
OF NEARLYTWOBILUON POUNDS
Special price schedules have
been developed to make the corn
hog rakers believe that this pro
gram will bring them some de
gree of salvation. Nine and one
half cents per pound are to be
from One)
more pork will bring the total re
duction in' hog supply during the
next marketing year, beginning on
Oct. 1, to about 1.800,000,000
pounds according to the plan..
In order to camouflage the
insanity of the scheme the
Roosevelt administration pro
claims that the pork will be
given to the unemployed. Even
if the unemployed are given
all of this H does not do away
with the fact that, over and
above the 600,000,000 pounds
given them, there will be «
out in the total supply of pork
available for the working peo
ple of this country of 1,200,
000,000 lbs. during next year.
The hunger program already
being applied to wheat thru
acreage reduction ig going to
be applied to hog production.
SPECIAL PRICE
SCHEDULES
>
Chicago, for pigs weighing 25 to
30 pound» dowm- to 6 cents per
pound for pigs weighing from 96 j
to 100 pounds; a quarter-cent ;
pound 1 lese for each five-pound ;
jump in weight above 30 pounds
pL^th^markrtpHc^for packing
SaSfSSSS
mai s full weight i s be ng paid fo
each sow near farrowing and
weighing stiere j
Prices at other poi ts will ran
with the freight. I
SALES TAX PROGRAM
The hog program is nothing
but the introduction of sale.
tax on one more . em of mass
consumption. Waltece defend
ed this program of mass star
vation at Ü« ternary of I,
Progress when he spoke there
°° AUg * 18 : y C0 ?/ UmerS
ate lees pork but paid some
what higher prices it,
dedared Wallace, the total re
hm. t® jhe farmer. wooM be
S TCater *
He lik» the rest of the Roose
velt administration is trying yet to
prtnif a the farmers believe that
their salvation lies through the
starvation of the consumers, that
the less the consumers eat the
better off will the farmers be.
Actually the raising of prices in
this manner—out of the pockets of
the mass of working people—will
cut the farmers' market even more
and provide the basis for a
slum to yet unreached levels of
misery.
Wallace has declared that the
hog program must be followed by
a long term program of curtailed
and hog production. Accord
ing to him "there are 20 million
too many acres planted to corn in
this country" and the aim of the
new deal is to take these twenty
million acres out of production."
new
corn
PLAN TO CUT 20,000,000
CORN ACRES
This program is supposed to bel
a program of and by the farmers.
In order to convince the farmers
of this, meetings of government
officials, packing house repreeen-;
tatives and high salaried farm
LEADERS, were held during the
past months in the com belt.
Out of these meetings came not
a farmers' program but a meat;
packers' program. I ne meat pack-'
ers have been made an integral
part of the apparatus under the
new program. Wallace is going i
to allocate the number of hogs
that each packer should buy— j
through the Institute of American
Meat Packers of Chicago — the
headquarters of the meat trust.
HALF CENT PER LIVE
POUND
The amount of the sales tax has
not been aet definitely yet but the
tax fcuggested is one half eent a
pound rn live port. This tax Is
going to be collected on every
pound ol live pork brougnt in for
sale, which will mean more than a
half een. a pound sales tax to be
paid by the working class consum
ers on one of the moat vital ne
cesritiefi of life.
In P' dition to the "benefits"
which the farmers are supposed to
get from the government buying
program they are supposed to
benefit from "higher prices for the
remainder of the hog crop sold
during the 1933-1934 marketing
year."
The hog rateers will discover
that this new deal will curtail con
sumption among the working peo
ple — BECAU SE T HEIR PUR_
CHASING POWER TS NOT BE
Throughout the country the fanners are learning that
these are real allies—allies not in HOPE but in STRUG
GLE,
Mr. Peek's fears are well taken. He knows that this
city working class which cannot exist under the "social or
der which we have all grown up," is learning that it must
make an end to this system under which they and we have
"prospered" to the point of destitution and homelessness.
The growing impossibility of living any longer under
the system "under which we have all grown up" will make
it necessary for us to decide to fight, side by side with the
city workers, for the establishment of a new order of so
ciety—a system where we shall prosper to a "greater de
gree," in preference to a system where our lives and the
lives of our loved ones are at the merev of the unbridled
rape of the bankers and their war machine.
ING INCREASED BY ONE BIT
THROUGH THE NEW DEAL.
ADMIT CONSUMPTION
CURTAILMENT
Even the Roosevelt administra
tion has been forced to admit this.
The Agricultural Adjustment Act,
under which the new deal for the
farmers is bfefng carried through,
provided that a tax could be im
posed on farm products sufficient
to bring the price to the farmer
up to the "fair exchange value."
The tax of one half cent a pound
which te being proposed is LESS
THAN ENOUGH TO MAKE UP
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
WHAT THE FARMERS ARE
GETTING NOW AND THE
"FAIR EXCHANGE VALUE."
For this reason a hearing will
be held on Sept. 6 in the May.
flower Hotel at Washington. Ac
cording to a press release from
the Agricultural Adjustment Ad
ministration on Aug. 26 "The Ag
ricultural Adjustment Act pro
v A ide ? ** w t h€n th ® Secretary of
^grieu ture has reason to believe
^ j he ^position of the full tax
wovdd cause a reduction in the
consumption of the commodity in
gestion and would result in the
of surpluses, he shall
f
0 d a oeanng.
WHAT THE TAX WILL
MEAN
„ ,
. P * hearing is, therefore,
J***« J*f U
REASON TO BELIEVE THE
REDUCTI0N IN œN
q TTMPTmM nw to- rn «
MODITY IN QUESTION^
AND WOULD RESULT IN
ACCUMULATION OF SUR.
PLUSES."
reaaon that only a half
^ tax . w adv< ^ |g
that the administm ian ^
that H wil| ^ ^ ^
99 -
ag
fe-r from the fu] , ^ ^
^ tfce lug ^ fl
up quite es suddenlv as it
would utlder the impos U ior of
, - „ -
The half cent tax' will, how
^ h aTO th. „r, «m. rf.
feet as the full tax, even if
so sharply at first. Tf
wiR curtail production and
pile np the surplus of pork
{ n to a hog mountain,
;
Langer
(Continued from pape One)
kota under the belief that he was
their man and rot the bankers'
man ae Langer shouted all over
the state, correctly, that his I. V.
A. opponent was; the sales tax
proves beyond a doubt that Langer
is also a bankers man.
The Saleg Tax Bill ia a
bankers measure, supported
by Gov. Langer fur the bank
ere. It takes the burden of
taxation off property, off the
railroads, the power com
panies, the land owners name
ly the insurance companies and
mortgage bankers who now
own most of the farms of
North Dakota or will soon own
them, and puts it all oki the
backs of the consumers, the
farmers and workers — tax.
in g everything the farmers
and workers muet buy for the
clothing and feeding of them
selves ahd families, the up
keep of their homes, the op
1
|
;
j
;
erations of their farms, re
pairs on their farm machinery
and their automobiles and
trucks.
WILL PRODUCE HLGE
REVENUE YEARLY
^ estimated that this Salta
Tax will raise a huge sum of
money each year and insure the
bankers and bond holders the pay
ment, of the interest on their bonds
and the principle when it falls
due.
The Sales Tax is an Emergency
Replacement Tax, suspending the
tax levied against the property of
the state by law to pay the inter
est and retire the principle of the
Real Estate Bonds, and replacing
the money intended to be rateed
in this manner out of the money
raised by the Sales Tax for the
duration of the act, which will be
if passed from dale of passage un
til June 30, IDS? when the Bus
pended property tax levy for the
above purpose again become op
era live.
1
The Sales Tax Bill was not the
only measure Gov. Langer submit
OTHER BILLS
SUBMITTED
ted to the voters for a decision at
the Special Election. He also sub
mitted the initiated Beer Bill, and
five other measures. At first it
was Danger's design to submit
only the Sales Tax and Beer Bill,
but protest and pressure finally
forced him to submit most of the
remaining referred and initiated
bills pending but he still left out
the two referred beer laws.
BEER TO HIDE
SALES TAX
The reason that Oœ bank
ers wanted the two measures,
Beer and Sales Tax. yoked
together is plain, for it was
hoped that the popular Beer
Rill, its hip-boo-ray, would
drown out the attention to
the Sales Tax and thus Beer
would tow Sates Tax thru to
victory. Hi order to further
insure the passage of the Sale
Tax, 25 per cent of the reve
nues therefrom waa diverted
to the aid of destitute school
districts, so the supporters of
the Bill can campaign for it
''school relier' bill. In
the carrying out of this
scheme. Gov. Langer is em
phasizing the Tax Sales Bill
'''school relief" Bill, stat
ing as his reasoto at the time
he called the special election
for calling it, the noed of this
revenue to maintain country
school«, which without it must
close.
as a
as a
SEVEN PROPOSITIONS
SUBMITTED
Three referred measures, two
initiated laws asd two constitu
tional amendments will be voted
upon at the special election by vir
tue of the governor's proclama
tion.
The measures which will be
placed on the ballot will be:
REFERRED
MEASURES
1. Referred Sales Tax Measure.
2. Referred . Workmen's Com
pensation Bureau Commission
measure, which provides for the
removal of members of the work
men's compensation bureau with
or without cause.
3. Referred measure abolishing
the office of receiver of the state
banks.
INITIATED MEASURES
1. Initiated Beer Bill.
2. Initiated bill legalizing Sun
day movies.
CONSTITUTION
AMENDMENTS
1. Regulating term 8 and elec
tion of county officers.
2. Regulating the reading of
Billç before the Assembly.
TWO REFERRED BILLS NOT
INCLUDED
Not appearing on the ballot will
be the two referred Municipal Beer
Store Bolle. No mention of these
measures were made by Governor
Langer in his proclamation and for
that reason, Attorney General A.
J. Gronna has ruled that the meas
ures will not come up for vote at
that time. These Acts will there
fore be held over until the regu
lar election in 1934, Mr. Gronna
states. Why these referred meas
ures were left out is a conjecture,
but looks like a political nuroeuver
of the governors.
LANGER PEDDLES
MANY PENS
The signing of the Procla
mation calling the special elec
tion wag made the occasion for
regal pomp and ceremony, as
the chief executive delights in.
The ceremony was witnessed
in awe by Stephen Ter Horst,
head of the regulatory depart,
ment; James Mulloy, Secre
tary of the Industrial Commis,
sion; Frank Vogel, the gover
Bor's ehe man Highway Com
missioner; and A. G. Sundfor
and A. G. Shipley, president
and secretary of the Asso
ciation for the Legalizing of
Sale of Beer; and Usher L.
L. Burdick, lawyer, Chairman
of the North Dafcota Holiday
Association, and politician,
probably representing the
bankers and bondholders—of
Fargos and Sen. O. E. Erick
»mi of Kidder awmty, the
author of the bankers Sales
Tax bill. The governor used
three pens in the making of
his signature on the proclama
tion; one he wrote William
with and presented it to Mr.
S lind for; the second, he wrote
the initial letter "E", and pre
sented it to Mr. Vogel, and
the third and last, he wrote
Langer, and presented h to
Mr. Ericksflta. There wa» no
pen for Mr. Burdick.
DELINQUENT TAXES
FORCE ELECTION
In the Proclamation Gov. Langer
aet forth the election wac rendered
imperative because of poor crop
conditions and resulting delinquent
taxes which made new revenues
absolutely necessary to maintain
the state.
BANKERS AND SCHOOLS
NEED THE MONEY
After the signing of the Proc
lamation' calling the epecial elec
tion, the chief executive, gave as
his excuse for going to the ex
of an election, the emer
pense
gency caused by the depleted fi
nances of the state and especially
of the school districts. "The Sale s
Tax and the Beer Revenue are nec
essary to help finance the common
schools of the state," he declared,
sari 11 ? further, that he had re
ceived letters from more than
4,000 members of district school
boards telling of their plight.
GOVERNOR SILENT AS
TO BANKERS
The governor did not disclose
Advance Guard Doings
When you read the Advance Guard you probably get the impression tnat we are do
ing wonderfully well, going over the top in leaps and bounds. And we are doing well, but
it is only in spots, and these spots are much too far apart.
Look what we could do if we had a dozen people in each county working for ^
paper, and there isn't a county in the U. S. where a dozen people would not be willing to
boost'for the paper if we could only get in contact with them. There are live
every county and there are getting to be more right along.
Moreland mpre, a* one »writer says "Finally have come to realize that a new
from the old deck is impossible." It is these people we got to get in contact with. They I
will subscribe for the paper when they find out what it advocates and stands for, but
it is up to our Advance Guard to help make the contact.
From the office we are doing the best we can, but those in the field have a chance to
talk to the people, and talking is what counts, it brings more actual results than writing
when it comes to getting subscriptions.
ones in
DOINGS OF LAST WEEK
-
C. A. Morris, San Joaquin Co.,
Calif., sends «ne sub.
The UFL, Lincoln Co. Wis. or
ders a bundle pf papers.
Howard F. Riddlle, UFL field
organizer in Cascade Co. Mont.,
sends one sub and orders pro
grams.
Refcio Tantilla, UFL Secretary (
of St. Louis Co. Minn., sends three j
more subs and remits on account. ;
Roy Anderson, Aitkin Co.
Minm, sends one sub. "Will
get more later. The Produc
News should be 1*» tWe
hands of every farmer" he
writes.
ers
GOT TO STICK TOGETHER
Tolay Panko, Carson Co. S.
Dak. renew«. "Because I like
your paper,
date. We have to stick to
gether if we wan 4 to get some
It sure Is up-to
how many letters be had received
from bankers and bondholders or
how many bankers delegations had
called on him, urging him to xake
steps immediately to bring about
the passing of the Sales Tax that
would guarantee the payment of
the interest and principle of the
real estate bonds, threatening to
default by reason of the general
delinquency of the property taxes
of the state caused by the general
bankruptcy of the fanners and
workers, nor did he many
letters he had received from the !
breweries and their agents and of
others wishing to gamer the pro- j
fit s to be derived out of the »ale
of 3.2. The Governor left all of ;
that unsaid. But he put great '
stress upor.' the needs of the bank
rupt school districts which will get
25 per cent of the returns of the
sales tax while the bankerrs and
bondholders get 75 per cent.
DOESN'T SAY HOW TAX
CAN BE PAID
Neither did the governor attempt
to explain how farmers and work
ers who cannot pay their taxes
because of poor crop conditions,
and meet the needs of the state
that way, are going to be able to
raise the money to keep the schools
running, or to pay the bankers and
bondholders their interest by pay
ing a tax upon the food they must
buy to feed their children or the
clothes they must buy to cover
their nakedness, or the fuel they
must buy to keep their homes
warm; nor did he explain how the
people who cannot find the money
to pay taxes, can find it to buy
beer and thu s produce the money
to run the state that would Pe
available if the delinquent taxes
were paid. Neither did Langer
explain how it was that when he
forced the Sales Tax thru the leg
islature, the farmers were not at
that time confronted with "poor
crop" conditions for the year 1933,
nor did he explain' who it was at
that time that called upon him and
wrote him letters.
There were calls and there
4
were letters February
urging Ihe passage of the
Sales Tax—but they were not
from members of dte'rict
boards. They were from bank
ers, bondholders and members
of banking corporation boards.
No farmers or workers called
asking for such a 'ax.
REFERRED BEER LAW
NOT INCLUDED
There were two Beer Bills,
passed by the Dakota Legislature
last session, later referred to the
people by petition under the pro
visions of the Referendum Act,
that Gov. Langer did not include
in his Proclamation to be voted
upon at the special election Sep
tember 22. These two bills pro
vided for municipal beer stores to
be owned and operated by the
counties, cities and towns with the
profits going into the local treas
uries. Just why the governor did
not include these two measures,
pasted by the legislature, and
signed by him, he does not ex
plain. These measures have as
much right to go before the voters
for their consideration as any of
the other submitted September 22.
Governor Langer may have for
gotten them, but moat people here
at Bismarck don't believe that;
they believe he left these
ure s out purposely, and because
the brewery interest and those
posed to any sort of municipal
public ownership 1 the bankers and
business men, told him to do it.
The leaving of these referred
measures out of the Proclamation,
delayed action upon them trtil the
time of the primary election next
June, and give* the right of way
to the initiated measure, initiated
very . pvidently with intention of
suhmitting at a special election
which was no doubt planned some
time ago.
meas
op
or
OMITTED ACT CAUSES
WONDER
The excluding 0 f the referred
place," he write«. a
jj. kelson, Marshall Co., S. D.,
ig sending seven subs which he
gayg he got yesterday. They are
n ow planning a monster mass
mating at Rutland, N. Dak. in
the near future.
HOPING FOR COST OF
PRODUCTION
Frank I. North, Crawford
Co. Iowa, sends us two subs
and writes. "Have efnjoyed
reading Shay's Rebellier. The
farmers here are very cau
tions alt this time, not know
ing where to look for relief.
But have some Mope that we
miglri get cost of production."
Carl Anderson, Bowman Co., N.
D., sends 11 26 cent subs.
F. Murtlahd, Beltrami Co. Minn,
sends another sever subs.
Herbert Jalonen, Stillwater Co.,
Mont., sends one sub and pays for
beer measures, caused a sensation
here at Bismarck and considerable
controversy. Some people thought,
including some lawyers, that if a
special election were caUed to sub
mit referred and initiated meas
ures, that all such measures mast
be included. The matter was re
ferred to the attorney general, by
! Secretary of State Byrne who de
: „landed an opinion, a» to whether
; only measures specifically named
in the Governor's Proclamation
could be submitted to the peo
pi e at the special election or
whether all initiative and ref- ;
erendum measures, including the
two not mentioned in the Procla
ma tion, should! be submitted. As- j
gistant Attorney General Charles
a. Verret, returned the opinion for
Attorney General Gronna who
ßeems to be keeping aloft from the
special election matter for reason
not yet explained, holding that
only the three referred measures,
aut the two Initiated laws ard the
two constitutional amendme-te
specifically mentioned in Lamrer's
Proclamation should go on thej
j
HIP-HOO-RAY FOR :
INITIATED BEER BILL j
The most popular issue before i
the public is the beer proposal. it
*
is intended aa the headliner to take,,
U» center o i the siegelnd do the I
etar stuff, thus keeping the Sales
Tax in the wings and out of the
public eye, until the voters wake
up Saturday morning, September |
23, to find a vicious Sales Tax
fastened upon themselves, a tax
wrung out of their poverty ana
misery to pay interest to bankers
and bondholders. Gov. Langer has
definitely taken a part in the
trickery. It ie planned to put the
loud pedal on the beer campaign
to drown out by noise and hip
hoo-ray all discussion and consid
eration of the Sales Tax. All of
the capitalist papers, both large
and small, daily and weekly, are
now doing this very thing; play
ing up beer and playing down the
Sales Tax.
The initiated Bill would
eliminate the municipal s to«e plan
as passed, by the last legislature
aud would substitute sales by pri
rate «caused dealers for profit,
thru the medium of a beer com
missiouer in charge, licenses cost.
ing from $15 to $600. The meas
nre comprehends all angles of beer
selling and in .a saving clause pro
vidés that any section of the Bill
declared unconstitutional will not
void the remaining provisions of
the act, air<J voids such section* as
may conflict with other revenue
acts. It creates the office of Beer
Commissioner, with' a salary of
$3,500 per year._appointed by the
Governor.
The second initiated act submit
ted at the special election is the
Sunday Theatre amd Movie Act,
AN ACT making it lawful to op
erate moving picture theatres, and
to show moving picture and
theatrical performance» therein for
profit, on Sundays, and to repeal
any laws that now make such act
unlawful." Many efforts have been
made to put this act thru the leg
islature, vainly, and initiative
measures have failed two ir three
times heretofore ;nevertheless the
voters will consider the matter
again. It is hoped by its support
ers that thje beer hip-hoo-ray will
carry the measure thru this" time.
CLOSED BANK
ACT
Another of the three referred
measures provides for a set up for
the special administration and the
liquidation of closed banks. It
provides that the District Court of
Burleigh county shall have exclu
sire jurisdiction over insolvent
banks, with the power to appoint
receivers, attorneys, make final
orders, etc., taking the matter out
of the hands of the state Banking
Depar t ment, and out of the hands
of the several district judges. The
SUNDAY THEATRE
ACT
«
bundle. "It seems hard to
subs, but I will try and get
one I can" he says.
C. M. Boskaljon, Washington
State UFL Organizer,. Piere« C#
Wash., remits for booklets ud
papers,
every
TEXAS FARMERS WANT
THE PAPER
Louise Prcece, Travis Co,
Texas, sends stamps for È
bundle. "All of us are simply
broke. I gave the last bund!*
away and they almost scrap
ped over them," she writes.
Stremdahl, St. Louis Co
Mi>n. renews for a year.
Math Marking, Foster Co. N. D
subscribes.
Due to lack of space we
have been forced to omit a
large part of this week's Ad
vanoe Guard Doings. Th#
will be printed next week
Ed.
act also provides for a definit*
liquidating period,
WORKMAN'S COMPEN.
SATION Af?f
The third ie f erred act
M the Workman's Comp'ensadoD
r^^I Act, is a law nrovidin,
for the rem0val of Workn Jf
Compensation Commissioner br
the WITHOUT CAÜSI
u meaa . fi that the goverr
fire
can
a Workman's Compensatio»
Commissioner anytime that he n
CONSTITUTION AI
AMENDMENTS
1
' u b " 111 ed are Constitutional
AwieTlc *mente, Concurrent Résolu,
tlons / , re ^ erre< ^ *° ^e people by the
Provisions of the Constitution H.
, * * irs * bas do
el .^ tK) ? terms of county
, s '. 1 f t Wa * Sub * m - , * < 1 by the
V rc ' f d
of '?■
" ame 'y 'he Clerk of Court amIS,
^""'7 Judge, Renter of M
a "d Clerk of Court and Om*
Judge, etc., un counties of certaa
populations. It is a county econo.
my measure. The second has k
do with the reading of bills in the
als0 submitted by U»
J93» Lepslature, proyidmg that .
'legislative bill, shall be read at
desires.
The remaining two proposition
. , ,. . , , ,,
'""t l »° tn T e5 " ra t ch h °T 1
*' r . st b J nnn ; b t r 1 and J*
" nl f a , ^nded that it k
read " ,al1 ' and lhe sec0, ' d t,m
in full, and prohibiting the first
and second reading on the san*
legislative day. It ateo provides
for the length of a legislative day
—that it shall not have more thar
24 hours in it.
BALLOT LONG AND
CONFUSING
The ballot which will be handed
to the voter at the special electio»
will be the longest and most ef
fusing ever handed out in the his
tory of the state or in the bistop
of initiative and referendum vet
;
mg.
ELECTION DAY JEWISH
HOLY DAY
K on *." , ?
, v A
boluis ' ot thc 3 ™ a \. ft d
'J* °. bMrvance f wb, ' b
f t the po lM
v ff- ^ J ™' 5b eltlM,lry of *
^ »» tba
as *"* da,e ^ 'hanged bot W
P et,t,OT was de " ,ad ' Tf T
m " st Totc °"
„ ....... .. rrno v
ELErl
DECADE
The September election will »
the fimt special election since ^
f r( * the second since I- •• .
to records m the o ice
s^etary of state.
BYRNE PREPARING
PAMPHLET
Secretary of State Robert
has already begun steps t° r
preparation of the publicity
phlet which the constitution *
quires shall be mailed to eacj 1 ^
istered voter before a
tion. The pamphlet will coa*J
the text of the various mia rZ
and the question involved.
in the pamphlet for argirn 16 ®^
or against various measur^ ^
be purchased by oreanizs ^
individuate at a rate of
page, according to
tional regulations. ^
that copy for such ^
ba received by him vp to ^
ft at the pamphlet **** .*,.}$
While this date Is r ° ^ $
decided, the Secretary -y*
It would he ae «> on as
BAN ON ABSENT
VOTERS , ,
There will be ™
rte special <p!««*
22. This mlkigr *** . '
Wednesday, Anenst & 9 ^£
ant Attorney Generel
law provides tor
abeent voter's
marv and General
will' eliminate
votes of those a 1- jetrs ^ f
to vote, including goir^
holy prohibits then» ^
the polls.
10
on

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