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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, September 08, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, Image 1

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THE
COUNTY EDITION
PRODUCERS NEWS
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
Plentywood, Sheridan County, Montana, Friday,
VOL. XVI. Number 24
SEPTEMBER 8, 1933.
Published Weekly
«T 1 p r.
>■
.Y
'f T
1
UNITED ACTION
OF
Meet November 8 to 11
1 000 FARMERS WILL MEET IN MASS CONFER
ENCE IN CHICAGO , SPREAD STRUGGLE
FOR "REAL RELIEF"
Nat'l Dairy Strike Is on Agenda
Militant Farmers Discussing Campaign to Force Can
cellation of Back Debts; 60,000 Farmers
Back Call for Conference
Washington, D. C., Sept. 2.—A conference of dirt farm
ers, to be held in Chicago. November 8-11, is being called by
the Farmers National Committee for Action, according to
Lem Harris, executive secretary. The call will be issued to
day. The farmers conference is expected to bring together
approximately 1,000 farmers from all parts of the country
who will lay down a program of action in a "fight for real
relief.''
The conference call throws
into sharp relief the question
of a national dairy strike
movement of dairy farmers.
Lem Harris, who is a mem- i
her of the strike committee
of the Philadelphia Regional
Coni-ittee, which has called)
a «tnhe in the Philadelphia
milk shed in 30 days, empha
sizes in the call the import
ance of this type of action if
th* fy.mevs are to get relief.
DEMAND FOR CANCELLA. Î
TION OF DEBTS
The problem of debts is para
mount with the farmers today,
just as it was last December when
the first Farmers National Relief
Conference was held in Washing
ton, according to Harris. But
where the farmers demanded
moratorium on their debts last
year, there is already talk among
the farmers^ of a campaign to win
cancellation of their back debts.
It may be that cancellation ip the
°nly way out," Harris eaid.
The conference call criticizes th e
atm Deal for the destruction of
"tK com and hegs, and for the
wheat reduction
I
I
<
a
program, at a
are unem
time
when millions
Pjoyed and hungry. The National
Committee complains that N. R.
. bas not increased the purcha,«-,
power of the city consumers
tat, partly because of inflation,
tas actually curtailed it. The call,
the processing tax as a
tax which results in cutting
tb e markets of the farmer.!
DN1TY "ITH CITY WORKERS j
The call dt dares that the farm- !
want higher prices at the ex
jpta ol the middlemen and pro
n * eers > n °t at the expense of the
ta^umers, "most of whom are
•wjmg peo P i e like us."
The National Committee, which
the Chicago Conference, if
, yaTne com mittee which
iast December
"am
was
when a
er?' march" on Washington
'vontlnupd on ragn Two)
S.MÉJEF AGENT
8 FARMERS enemy!
y Co. Attorney Favored
*c of Terror to Carry
^Veugh Evictions
Correspondent)
_*. w Sept. 4.—One of
°* Governor Berry's
i< U wis le I c 5 ni ^ 3sion . we notice,
of ^ »"knell, state's attorney
tone* ! roonty. He obtained no
•OuiKt \ Wh!le ba<dc b ? the charge
tbat Vi* lm * or h* 8 constituents
Wm r i ^,* dro< * t int a reign of
W J T c °onty In order to
^i # T verislied farmers
Pqqmm. j b ®y w ere being dis
**tt*tf !! ^ farm a and other
TO?**
M ".^. r members of the
hîe H u n '° n ar ? °f the same
|if Til "V ?wder Wreetor of
re
Forward to
Chicago
We urge immediate action by
all Unified Farmers League or
ganizations, the local, coon,
ty a nd state, by every indi
vidual member of the U. F. L.
and reader of the Producers
News to make the • Farmers
Second National Conference
representative of the impover
ished farmers throughout the
breadth and length of America,
ti?e United States.
1. Hold local meetings to
elect delegates.
2. Organize ways and means
to cviivcr the cost of sending the
delegates.
3. Use the Producers News
,jo popularize the Conference
among the farmers. The Pro
duct rs News will carry the of
ficial releases from the Farm
ers National Committee for Ac
tion.
i
i
:
4. Report to the Producers
News and to iflie United
Farmers League National Of
fice, 1629 Linden Ave., Minne
apolis, Minn, every action taken
to build the conference.
5. Build the United Farmers
League in the preparations for
the Conference,
6. Build a mass circulation
for itftie Producers News during
the campaign to send delegates.
7. Make preparations now to
have big bundles of the News
way to Chicago. Tell
a
ion your
the date the delegates are
leaving so thait we can get the
papers to you in time. Send in
your orders as soon as possible.
US
8. Order bundles of all UFL
literature to take alotag and to
sell or the road back.
9. Send us your suggestions
to how 'the League and the
Producers News can best co
operate to make the Conference
a success.
10. Don't delay. Start your
preparations flor the conference
now.
i
as
FURTHER CUTS IN
BRITISH IMPORTS
OF FOREIGN BEEF
Hawick, Scotland, Aug. 29.—
Major Walter Elliot, tha British
Minister of Agriculture, announced
announced in a speech that for the
last quarter of 1933 imports of
foreign frozen beef would be re
duced 26 per cent.
There also will be a reduction of
about 16 per cent in the Imports
of Argentine chilled beef. The^e
two item®, Major EWot said,
mean a drop of more than 20,000
tons from the Imports of ' a8t:
quarler of 1932.
Three Connecticut
Banks Close Doors
Bridgeport, Conn., Aug. 30.—
Thiee Bridgeport barks, with de- 1
I posits of $6,650,000 were closed
i today by the State Banking Com
! missioner, Walter Perry.
The banks are the Commercial;
Bank and Trust company with de
: posits of $3.200,000; the American
Bank Tins* company with de-.
.posits of $1,450,000; the West
j Side Bank with deposits of $2,
; 000 , 000 .
McVeigh, S. D. Farm Head
Is Building Fences to
\
FHA LEADER IS
OUT FOR A JOB
Pierre, S. D., Sept. 4. Among
those mentioned as possible can
didates for the Republican nomi
nation for governor is State Sen
ator Barney McVeigh of Marshall
county. It has been easy to see
for a long while that this Milo
Reno-A. C. Townly henchman who
is president of the state F. H. A.
had! his eye on the governorship.
However, his hypocricy, his policy
of radical phrases and inaction,
has thoroly exposed him to South
Dakota farmers. During the
Farmers State Relief Conference
Get Governor Job
(By Special Correspondent)
in Pierre he offended many farm
TH riTDTAH ncr AC
TO CURTAIL USE OF
FOREIGN WHEAT FOR
BREAD IN GERMANY
A „ _ . . , ,
Berhn, Sept. 2. Potato meal and
skimmed milk are prescribed as
ingredients in German bread by a
government decree devised by,
Hiehard Darre, Minister of Agri
culture, and promulgated today. It
îs to be effective until October,
Potato meal must constitute at
least 4 per cent of ihe wheat
flour used. And 10 per cent by
weight of the mixture must be
dried skimmed milk. These ad'
ditions are not expected to imu
prove t he qualify of German
hread. They have been decreed to
reduce the demand for foreign
wheat.
RFNFW VOTTR STTpsrRTPTTON.
$? PER YEAR
ers who previously had faith in
him by his callous attitude of in
difference to them while they were
in the capital.
1934.
S. D. League Conference
On Sept. 18 Will Build a
State-wide Organization
a
UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
State Office
Sisseton, North Dakota
Fellow Farmers:
The majority of the South Dakota fanners will be facing
desperate situation this fall and winter. Widespread
drouth following four years of crisis has left hundreds of
farmers without feed for .livestock or resources to provide
feed. Hundreds are without means to provide for them
selves and families. More taxes are being loaded on our
backs. •
Experience of the farmers and workers in the struggle
live during this crisis has clearly shown that the only
means by which the farmers can protect their homes, live
stock and security of existence as by a militant fighting
organization.
Recognizing this, the United Farmers League is calling
statewide conference at Aberdeen on September 18 and 19
for the purpose of discussing needs of the farmers and for
mulating a state program of demands for feed for livestock,
cash relief for our families, relief from taxes and rent,
abolition of foreclosures and seizures of personal property.
The United Farmers League appeals to every farmer
reading this, to call meetings in their neighborhoods, orga
nize a group of farmers who will support a militant pro
of demands and elect delegates to go to the confér
ât Aberdeen. Then notify the state secretary of the
gram
ence
U. F. L. of action taken. . ,
Delegates should be provided with a registration fee of
50 cents to cover the cost of organizing the conference such
as: postage, stationery, hall rent and stenographer expense.
Housing and eats will be provided as cheaply as possible.
Farmers of South Dakota! We have been fed on hope
pnd dope foryears, but our condition has grown worse
steadily. Necessity demands that we fight for our rights.
Every farmer in South Dakota should be getting the
Producers News published at Plentywood, Montana.
Fraternally yours,
JULIUS WALSTAD,
State Secretray of the U. F. L.
Force Sheriff to Go
Thru With Sale; Give
Deputy Good Seating
__ _ „ . „ _ ... . _ __ _ -
DEPUTY SHERIFF FAILS IN ATTEMPT TO SCARE
FARMERS AT SALE WITH TEAR GAS;
rTkFÇ TO HO^PITAI
laATEO lUnwniAL I
!
!
(By Special Correspondent)
... .
here by that method, left the
deputy, John Nord, badly
' J or */1
Miibank, S. D., Aug. 28.—
A Grant county sheriff also
learned today, to his sorrow,
that it does not pay to fool
with tear gas bombs around
South Dakota farmers, An
attempt to break up a 'Sears
Roebuck' foreclosure sale
i shaken up and scared, and
j the sale went on in an order
j ly, peaceable manner.
[ A foreclosure sale had been or
| dered to satisfy a mortgage held
by a closed Nassau, Minrefota,
bank against the property of Rob
ert stencel, a farmer living south
east of here The gale wag being
held at the Grant county fair
grounds by Sheriff W. W. Wikon.
i

deputy sheriff bid $5 on a binder,
Nord fired his tear gas gun into
1 the crowd of farmers and one man
went down. But instead of run
pi n f? the rest of the farmers dosed
in on the deputy and gave him
i
DEPUTY FIRES TEAR
GAS GUN
The farmers objected when a
good trouncing.
The auctioneer then refused to
S® ^^th the sale and left. Sher
iff Wilson declared the sale off
and announced that it would be
Drniircn ArDr ipr
REDUCED ACREAGE
FOR WHEAT BRINGS
UP CONTRADICTIONS
i w , . , a., t j
Washington Sept. l.-In order
; to try to avoid the contradictions
that will develop in the operation
of the acreage cutting program a
: decree has been issued by the
i Chester C. Davis, director of pro
duction of the Agricultural Adjust
ment Administration, which de-!
dares that the reduced wheat
acreage cannot be used in produc-,
ing feed for poultry, dairy cattle,
beef cattle, hogs or sheep when
the animals of their products are
to be sold. _
Farmers have the chance of
allowing such land to lie unplant
ed. summer fallowing, planting
j Permanent pasture, nla^ting to
meadow crons, trees, soil improve
j ment crops or practicing weed
control.
!
continued the following Thursday.
This did not suit the farmer, so i
I? ... .. ... .1
. said to I
have been abeut * 4 - W* 1611 the
sal . e ™ com 'P Ieted the crowd
qn'etly broke up. I
they proceeded to disarm him, a"d ;
emptied the shells out of his gun|
and demanded that he go on with !
the sale. They compelled him to i
go from one piece of equipment to ;
another and offer them for sale.!
An automobile sold for 16 cent, !
and tbe total proceeds are said to ;
I
rrA mo nu imi
Tft HISÏiF&TH
1U ni J ULAIII
_
!
j
,
(By a Farmer)
j Starbuck, Minn., Aug, 20.—Last
a w i n te r the Minnesota State Legis
The deputy and the ga=sed man !
were f aken to a doctor. Neithei
was seriously hurt.
Respected in Community,
He Turns to Robbery and
Is Murdered
lalcre and Governor Olson, Farm
pas ^ d a state Bank
jjolida-y Law. This law allows any
state bank to close up. It allows
them tQ reorgan i ze# They get you
! to sign away about 50 per cent of
I your money The other 60 per
j cent is so tied up you can not get j
a11 >' ou need -
If you sign up or not, this new
law, signed by the Minnesota
Farmer . Labo r governor forces you
to CQme in under the re0 rganiza.
' tion It ^ a lite way to rob tbe
people j P Morgan said "I am
, w jt b j n ^ b e law."
| FORCED ON ROCKS BY
' OLSON
Many gray haired farmers and
j workerS) wldoWg a r d orphans have
been forced on the rocks through
j this damn Farmer-Labor-Govemor
j oison law. Farmer Kjornes of
; Starbuck, Minni sola is only one
j case ou j. of mary . who is to
1 blame f Kjornes should have or
! ga nized a United Farmers League
and read t h e Producers News. His
| family and neighbors should do
j that now. Write them, send them
J copies of old Producers News.
j Farmers get busy.
* * *
i Editor's Note: Farmer Kjornes
j was shot and killed when he at
I tempted to rob the First National
! Bank of Starbuck on Aug. 18.
Kjornes has long been respected in
the community. . ^
"He couldn't ft and the strain,"
was the unanimous opinion o is
motive. He had los' all of his
savings in a bank which Roosevet
(
closed up abd his crops had been
ruined by drouth. j
i
Starbuck, Minn., Aug. 23.—
Since I sent you the story of the
Starbcck Minnesota bar.k robbery
few days ago, we are given aj
new slant on the case. Now they
charge Jus wife a s accessory.
hDTiL' Tri rUI ^tv nffiVial!
sutcwW Dept. .Sthc state
Gotgr nrccnt does not WW* th«
Srleen t/erime 'Li to hi, deeth
through the ioss ol his wtdngs,
Ike IjXd Farmers League and
International Labor Defense should
get the facta and see that the poor
wife fc not railroaded,
WANT TO WHITEWASH
OLSON
PACK
GYf^ FARMERS IN
\ E ^YING of hogs
vfew w. p.)
> V ash.—Th
COMPANY
Yakhna,
Herald pubt hes the Seattle price
on hogs which at the time of* this
incident was $5.90. Farmers here
figured that it wouW save money
and a long trip if they could sen
to the Gibson Picking Company of
Yakima, so they called up and
found tha+ the local cp^cern was
paying only $4.50. The Gibson
Co. had nublisheA in the paper a
price of $4.75. This shows one of
the ways the farmer is being
gvne^ in the vaHev because of lack
of education and organization.
e Yakima
I
• •
Martial Law Is Used to
Crush Working People;
Mob Beats Up Organizer
BLUEBUZZARD1
New Deal Bird of Prey
Uses Claws; Vigilantes
Are Organized
Farmer Retnnnin« tn 1
armer oegmnmg to Learn
Pnai rv_i
BUILD BULL PEN
p * iui • m r\ l
Real Meaning New Deal
— d—ia r--
_
it the Blue Eagle), symbol of
rising Fascism in the United
States has raised its ugly
head over t.hp hnriv.nn nf this
as Result of Experience
Tieton, Wash., Sept. 4.—,
The Blue Buzzard (some call
it the Blue Eagle), symbol of
(BY A. P.)
head over the horizon of this
fair Yakima Valley. Since the
kidnapping and brutal beat
ing of C. M. Boskaljon, state
organizer of the United Farm
ers League, by seventy cow
ardly masked vigilantes, a
ÎT k afr °l event ® have b ?, en
.Î ™ p J dly
Almost the entire Gooldfam
ily, militant fighting,
fearless leaders of the work
mg class iiuthe city of Yaki
ma, has been jailed.
Charles Goold, gray-haired, 53
year old leader of the Unem
ployed Council, was the first to
thrown in. Shortly afterwards he
was followed by hi s daughter and
son, Mary and Clifford Goold. The
The construction of the stock
ade, to bold' workers ha s been
completed. The "bull pen" is sit
uated in the heart of Yakima.
***** 10 . £ "' gr ° md il
has an elevated platform for gun
guards to walk on. Evidently it
is for the purpose of making the
people think that those imprisoned
workers are terrible people or
something of the sort.
have applied to the Reconstruction I
Finance Corporation, for a loan of
Reports have come in that vigi
laute committees have been orga
nized in many different parts of
the valley, all for the purpose of
keeping farmers and workers from
organizing. This valley has in the
past been one of the richest farm
i ug districts in the country. Many
of ^ f arme r s have acquired a
sort of a petty bourgeois outlook
on This is rather a difficult
thing t o break down, but it is be-1
j nR d<)ne
^ farmers that do understand;
the situa t Î0!n are not afraid, and
International Labor Defense is
now working on their case.
We know that it is all for th'e
raitTÄ-'Ä:
versa.
We understand that the
GUARDED BULL PEN
$23,000. Three thousand dollars
to pay for the cost of building the
stockade and twenty thousand dol
lars to cover the cost of trials. |
VIGILANTES ORGANIZED
are beginning to open their
eyes now, and are getting inter- !
This is proven by the ever
increasing number of subscriptions
to the Producers News. We ex
pect to see some strong United
Farme« League locals around
, here ver y soon. _There
^
« AniUO CliPPARTFn
jUli UtVllJ/
r AIT nrnnv nr C Hi
GOV. BERRY OF S.D,
-
«Shadow Boxing' in Snecinl i
Show^ His L^k !
of Sincerity ;
—— ... .
< E >' Special Correspondent)
Pierre, S. D., Sept. 4.—Senator
Emil Loriks, Ren o-T own ley boost
er in this state is eaid to have
made the following statement in
regard to his maneuvers in the i
special session of the legislature;
"Iwas simply trying to ^ve the
administration aJid ?Jff p 9?
Berry freer. eommitUng poUtici
suidde. , ...
co^Lste, ".8* hTlukewe^
for the repeal of the £<>„tncome
^dowT,rin? for the bene«
of the rank end ffle of the Famv
Union of the i?tate. H!s role
as a fhke leader in thi P orgenizs*.
Hon was thorolv exposed in a re-!««
cent l.»e nt the Frodu«« New,.
,
ested.
ers
RENEW YOTTP STTHRrRTPTTON. (
$2 PER YEAR
Farmers Will
Build United
Front in Wash.
The farmers of Washing
ton more determined than
ever to struggle despite the
terror organized by the New
for . th e capitÿists, de
cided under the leadership of
i?_ t
tt •*. j ü V1
the United Farmers League
to hold their United Front;
; Conference in Seattle on Sep
j tember 17. The conference
will take place at 110 Cherry!
All farmers are welcome to
i this conference, organized or
unorganized.
»
I
Street, Seattle.
timers \vaSab^for *th^or^
e ani Z ition of thL conference
|^3vthe debates to the
Yakima conference should at
tend but ZZy farmer who
; ^ ^uf^^et th^re IN
ORDER TO MAKE THIS
possible no creden-|
-.TIALS ARE BEING ISSUED
p 0R THE cONFERcNCE
and,_ ALL IMPOVERISHED
PA r M ERS ARE WELCOME.
The Unietd Farmer League
1® rallying every available
force in order to make the
conference a success.
Casey
Boskaljon, State Organizer
the U. F. L., has already
started on a ' state tour
♦ ♦
build the conference.
The conference will discuss
all those immediate problems ;
of the impoverished farmers '
of Washington which were to,
have been taken up at the
United Front Conference in ,
Yakima, which was smashed
through the declaration of
martial law. The conference
will also pay particular atten- ;
tion to those problems which i
have been brought forth most
sharply as a result of the
tSS, ° rganiZed Yakima
tuuuiy.
officials.I
* Turn to editorial bn page 2. *
# I
RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION
TODAY—$2 a year.
i
CHIEF OF BULLS SAYS GRANGE HEADS ORGA
Mivrn a tt a n\I All «Dmc
NIZED ATTAGK UN ALL KLUD
INCLUDING U. F. L.
Police Trap Incoming
Delegates In Yakima
/gy M. H, P.)
Kalama, Wash. — I have to
.liust returned from Yakima
should sav that I have
I should saythat 1 have
Just been DRIVEN trom ^
Yakima, where we were to
have our state UFL confer
ence. Martial law was de
dared in the entire Yakima
county the day before the I
coherence took place. ;jff
had been a pitched 1
battle between some 300 [f
facers and 100 workers in
the pear and peach fields. I
The atmosphere was very tense; j
Ä
their builder accomplices, the ;
^ t . eP " ro l
See™
^
lhe 1
DISPER SE PE ACEFUL !
HEFTING j
^ 24th, the day after the
etruggle> c Boskaljon, 0 vr State
gecretary; endeavored to
gpeak before some 700-800 work- j
erg Jn # gtreet but it ^
digperse<? ^ ^ aid of tear gas
bomb* and bayonets. '
^ ^ ^ ^
Yakima and met Comrades Bos
who ,n '!
^£**iii> ^Sng th^TCy
^ '"'i S
Fa!r e outg!
?. - the PlT > ! V ! r '. ^Tv"
1 frM ^ d€dare ^
.TW,
groonds. ord found 'ho V'R* »horp
P«»» of nirp fellow
delegates had -already been arrest
or exhibit
USETEARGAS
Boskaljon Third Degreed;
Handed Over to Lynch
Mob by Sheriff
i POLICE AID GUNMEN
-
New Deal Uses Immigra
I rue •„] ; *
uon Utncial in Attempt
to Crush League
.,
, About ih * eQ months ago,
I the State Committee of the
! United Farmers League de
cided to call a United Front
Conference of farmers to be

! held in Yakima, Aug. 27-28.
Calls were printed and the
! fair g rounds obtained. A $10
cash de P° sit wa * Posted on
the pounds. State Secretary,
Bosk aljon, and another
member of the UFL arrived
in Yakima on Aug. 24, to pre
pare ^ 01 mee tmS- When
îJj ey arrived , tbe after T5
'f heylean }f d .' hi } t , there bad
i ^ en a fl ? h ' . tbe
i {^ m % s aad th , e ,™™ s ' r, T k -
| f ?• Neither of the U. F. L.
( delegates had anything to do
j with the fight.
! The International Labor Defense
! had one of its thrice weekly meet
I rugs scheduled for the night of the
of ^Hi and a permit had been ob
for a street meeting for
to that night ' the I"®*?"!
JSwd
workers and farmers had gathered.
speaks ON ROLE OP UFL '
Boakaljon was introduC e d as a
repr€aentative of the UPL ^ h ,
äpoke (or hal( an hour mi the
farming situation injthe United
states and in the State of Wash
ington. He pointed out the ne
cearity of united action of work
ers and small farmers. Boskaljon
w as of the opinion that none of
* be ri ch farmers who later kid
hi ™ w . ere T>TTsent at th,s
*° T ^ never men -
After s p. aH r k f „r half ac hour
tbo meeting was broken up by tne
«>« nrcsence of
*h« Y-kima noifm !n «mt« f he
nmtest's of the members of the
Tv+omationsl T.ahor Dotgriso.
TTlO erW'flV'-C IpP tV" p;
f rVrit-îrmoi 1 T TSe-ol
the court house. It was im
mediately evident to us that the
bull s were stationed there to tjap
of our delegatee and rush them
^ cmjrt ^ fop fcvesti
^ e ° ° 86 0r 1 ves
attorn ^Xt
and büTÊTHi* investigation lasted
0r over an hour, and when he
came out I saw that they had
given him the third degree.
We were then searched and
jSÄ «ÄI
a lecture on behavior. He Sid
'""J* ,ik ' «
tTlSw ÏS Ä- ' *1
to the couniy
a jersey bull at Gold,
endaie. 72 mfle, from Yakima.
Boskaljon is now in solitary con
finement and Brockway, I suspect,
locked up. He told me
tbat be to give them a
piece of his mind, and he evident
d,d as the morning paper g aid
that two men had bcome rough.
k great free c«u*r,
America* >«k
» '*'*'** bJheM
£
»W» Ae bleeding Mm. the
po,,C€ ***** ******* M
become violent. Row long
mvmt we pot op with this?
and we were promptly taken
IMMIGRATION OFFICER
THERE
Pot other rforie*
Deal terror hi
turn to page four.
on the New
Washington

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