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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, November 03, 1933, COUNTY EDITION, COUNTY SECTION, Image 5

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_ COUNTY SECTION
RODUCERS NEWS
OFFICIAL ORGA N OF THE UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
Fkntywood, Sheridan County, Montana, Friday, November
32
jyL Number
3, 1933
Published
tgo HOME FROM RUSSIA:
BE SAYS RECOGNITION WISE
. YORK. Oct. 26. Return
trip to Russia,
G. McAdoo de
~ wise, indeed" the
„7 President Roosevelt in
looking toward
inn of the Soviet
after a
William
toe»'
very
85
recognition doe*
i If a form of
«flfCtmer secretary
said "there was never
* irhy recognition should
J**ogr.ition
> :
out
I
withheld.
» v Ca!tf° ria . ,
*• . . Mrs. McAdoo.
on the * Tosc(m stre S,
^ c , r McAdoo re a . d
seemed to be well fed and,
...
* 0nt> " '
much impressed by the
an d activity that I saw.
—been
senator was se
•- F
Ilf
, ..
were no loafers around the
said, "and I was assured
no unemployment,
1 *8
w*
. I
tor
was
U:F«re
(OSCOW, Oct. 26.—Maxim Lit
^ commissar for foreign f
left Moscow tonight for
ifcHnettm. "'here he will confer
UPrtridtnt Roosevelt regard
J American recognition of Soviet
J*is
*-■
it our capitalist press Julia
psfctrd has this to say about
lira f? : .
is a big man with a fat
ger.. rraym£ light hair, pale
h eyes that are cold and ealeu
and*
fc* at one
when he look* at his chil
He looks like a successful
(sith cloak-ard-suit merchant,
fcte hand? like a western cow
iw talks English with a London
M-flid Jewish accent, wears
k ;ut with his dynamic energy,
■ car out-argue anybody on
«orism doesn't bother Litvin-,
i He alVays hag met with it.
, . .. . ,
iknows that h^has a longer.
., , , .. , . _ .
retort for sticking to
tent .Jeals practically
•'fflà'n.l.hpvivè '"i, ntl p 1
tl* * • a. V i
saved for the small group which
idtàd Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin and
Aer? lucky enough to have been
I« the 1905 revolution.
Is business training i* one of
b biggest assets in his present
jjà hr he s the only Russian'
Caraisar who thef oughly under
•tads how to deal with represen
hr;.
abw of bourgeoise countries on
to own ground. Moreover, he
tooceMy enjoys it.
-
WASHINGTON, Oct. 26.—The
to« of former President Hoover
swertl of his cabinet mem
■s vere brought into testimony
•pi: today before the special sen
investigating mail
Tkr questioning centered on the
Ritciase by the Colombian com
J*! of the steamship Haiti from
■t|wernment for $10,000 and its
(■* R 1928, to the Ocean Domin
• Steamship corporation known
Aluminum line, for mini
*j® fonriderations totaling $206,
^
committee chairman said
• rarement paid $1.000,000 for
JSÏ awl spent more than the
Colombian
KRAL RELIEF
EHANDED OUT
purchase price
ijv— C 'Z~Z~—
JORR SUBSCRIPTION,
» PER YEAR
COUNTY OFFICE FOR
UNEMPLOYED WILL
BE CREATED SOON
An office where unemployed
register for public jobs is going to
, be set up in each county. Our
cou, . ,ty commissioners are pre
panng to have an office of this
ionh * ta ****** be.
can
A board of three directors has
been mentioned, consisting of count
ty commissioner A. J. Olson, Leo
Zeidler and Hans Rasmussen,
will be up to this board to appoint
a manager of the office as soon a 3
the final arrangements have been
made> whkh ^ expected t0 ^
(lone at the first commissioners
meeting, where a government
h as promised to be
it
man
present. -
This undertaking i s financed by
the county and it is expected t ^ e
0 ffl ce w ji| be located two door s
\vest 0 f Riba'* bank building.
this time Niels Madsen is doing
the registering.
At
1147 SEEK WORK IN
FLATHEAD COUNT*
KALI SPELL,
Oct. 27.—Fewer
families are expected tp apply for
relief in Flathead couriTy in No
vember because of increased em
ployment, the local committee has
announced.
In October». there have been 450
, families depending on the émer
gency relief organizations
pared with 1,100 in March,
A
as corn
pcu
salt pork from the
will be distributed.
■ Although the re-employment of
fice hag officially opened, applica
tions have been recorded for
than a month and now total 1,447.
CULBERTSON, Oct. 26.—Louis
T . « , ,
Johnson, for many years employed
1, r- .
a/ pumpman for the Great North
m Blai ,
h(md when ' |t
R ear s of the pump. He was taken
to a Williston. N. D. hospital,
;
government
more
Open competitive examinations
for a number of positions in gov
eminent service, including several
• for teachers, have been aimounced
by the United State s civil service
commission. They are as follow:
Junior graduate nurse, $1,620 a
year, various sendees throughout
the United States.
Teacher of home ecoriomice-, sen
ior high school. $2,000 a year,
teacher of home economics, reser
vation and junior high school, $1,
860 a year, Indian service, depart
ment of the interior.
Junior teacher of home econom
ice, $1,620 a year, Indian service,
department of the interior.
Student fingerprint classifier,
$1,440 a year, division of investi
gation, department of justice,
Washington, D. C.
Senior stenographer, $1,620 a
year, junior stenographer, $1,4Î0 a
year, senior typist, $1,440 a year,
junior typist, $1,260 a year, de
J partmental and field service.
I Senior forest and field clerk $2,
000 to $2,500 a year.
Forest and field clerk, $1,800 to
! $2,100 a year.
Loses Part of Hand
SEVERAL JOBS OPEN
INFEDERALSERVICE
Full information may be op
; tained from J. D. Gough, secretary
of the United States civil service
j board of examiners, at the poat
office in Helena.
Deer Slayers Return
Jens Jensen, local oil baron, Or
val Johnson and Dr. Hall
among those from here who brot
back a deer apiece from along the
Missouri this week. > It is reported
there are far more deer along the
river than people think but due
to the dense brush getting a good
shot at one is rathpr difficult. It
is whispered about, confidentially,
that several of tljp go-getters from
here suffered from buck fever
endeavord to talk the deer to
death. A tale is told of one fel
Icw, a prominent member of tne
upper stratum, who Was observed
with out-stretched arm pleadingly
calling "come bossy, come bossy"
to a fine big buck. After listen
ing for a brief spell the antlered
king turned his caudal appendage
toward the zenith and with a dis
gusted snort fled unharmed from
the scene.
are
or
OUT OF STATE
LABOR WARNED
FROM GLASGOW
HELENA, Oct. 24.—A warning
that it would be futile for out of
state laborers to go to Glasgow in
search of employment on the Fort
Peck dam project was issued to
night by Gov. Frank II. Cooney.
Cautioning that Montana winters
are cold and u at there will not be
sufficient e- vployment II lake care
of more than half of the laborers
in the nortneastem part of the
state, the governor *aid.
'"Outoide voikers dont need to
There will be r.o werk for
come,
There are plenty of work
them.
ers availaole T 'or the entire period
of constructs i.
He said he 1 ad
ieeu advised
that reports circulated in Cali
fornia said If*' CO lab^r^r..
needed for th piojec"
T.iiVo iTb >fficcs Only
Mer- will be in ployed eniy fhru
the federal re-employment offices
in each couuy. Men whr. are not
registered tl; . e unties in which
they reside will bt ouc jf luck.
They shoui î :.».t expect to go to
Glasgow and register there,
they will rot be permitted to do
so. All calls for labor will be
made thru these federal offices.
Glasgow is not equipped to han
dle a large influx of job seekers.
It ha* no extra housing facilities
and, with winter weather prevail
ing in the district, men who go
there on their owr- are bound to
suffer severe hardships.
Quarters will be provided by the
government for the employed as
soon a s it is possible to do so. It
k probable that bunk houees will
b e erected at the dam s ite.
Glasgow, Oct. 27.—^Eighty more
men went to work today clearing
brush for construction of the Ft.
^ >ec ^ c ^ am project. Thi* brought
th e number of employees to 230,
additional men are to be
hired tomorrow. All are residents
Va Bey county.
wore
for
BIG JOB AHEAD OF
ALLOTMENT BODY
By Emergency Agent Peterson
A big task faces the Wheat Al
lotment Committee of Sheridan
County during the next ten days
while computing the number of al
lotment bushels that each individ
ual farmer is justly entitled to.
It was thot that when the coun
ty average or pooled plan was
adopted that would simplify the
work of the county Wheat allot
ment office which it would but for
factor, i.e., the heavy acreage
run amounting to 27% as an
(Continued on Page two)
one
over
AUTO LICENSE LAW REVISED;
GENERAL SALES TAX DISCUSSED
NEW STATE LIBRARY
IS BEING PLANNED
HELENA, Oct. 25.—Plans for
co fctruction of an historic library
building on the spacious grounds
of the Montana state capitol took
definite shape today as the state
board of examiners awarded an
architect's contract to R. C. Huge
nin a v d Norman DeKay of Helena.
The board of library commission
ers at the tame time adopted a
resolution asking the board of ex
aminers to apply at once to the
public works administration for a
loan and grant of $235,000 for the
undertaking.
Plans submitted by the Helena
firm call for a two-story and base
ment structure, 200 feet long and
70 feet deep, to be constructed
with Montana granite on the ex
terior and Montana travertine
marble on the interior.
The plan contemplates the inclu
sion of two large halls, one to
be k"iown as the hall of governors,
the other the hall of pioneers.
The historical library .noSv is
housed in limited quarters in the
statehouse basement.
PALUBICKI-FRISVOLD
Stanley J. Palubicki and Miss
Con Fiisvold were united in the
holy l.o.'d* of matrimony early
Saturday morning, Oct. 28. 1933.
at the Catholic parr- nage by the
Rev. : *• Pratsch ne r. The cvuple
was attended by Erwin "Pud"
Marsh and Miss Lucille Goodman.
The conti acting parti' j have lived
in Plentywood many year* and -ire
well anch favorably knowr to a
large circle who wish them every
happiness in their new venture.
A miscellaneous shower was
given in honor of Miss Frisvold
by the Lutheran' Ladies at the
prettily decorated church parlors
Monday evening, a week ago. Six
ty guests were present. The bride
to-be was the recipient of many
beautiful and useful presents.
10 PROVIDE FOR
WANDERING IDLE
WASHINGTON, Oct. 26.—Mil
lions more pounds of food-*tuffs
were sought today by the govern
ment for the dual purpose of feed
ing the needy ard strengthening
the commodity markets.
In a simultaneous move to erect
a buffer for the unemployed
against winter's cold, the relief ad
ministration announced plans for
a chain of relief camps among the
state* to care for penniless wan
derers.
Harry L. Hopkins, the emer
gency relief adnr#dstrator, asked
for bids on 15,000,000 pounds of
canned beef to be distributed thru
wholesale and retail grocery stores
—bids to be opened Nov. 6, at the
relief office*- here.
Meanwhile it became known that
the federal surplus relief corpora
tion up to today has purchased
6.800.500 bushels of wheat of which
700.500 was cash wheat. Official
source*- declined- to state amount
of wheat that is to be bought, but
it was learned that further large!
purchases are intended.
All of the food distributed thru
grocery stores is to have stamped
on the can ot label "Not to Be
Sold."
In addition to the wheat and
beef, the relief administration is
purchasing apples, butter anid pork
for the jobless and their depend
ents.
At the special session of the
legislature, which is to take place
the middle of this month, raising
of additional tax for relief funds
will be the most ticklish question
coming up.
No doubt governor Cooney would
like to see a general sales tax im
posed on all the people of Mon
tana. In that way even the peo
ple who are on relief would have
to pay back a goodly share of it
in the form of tax.
But the governor saw hoW the
sales tax idea was snowed
completely under by the people in
North Dakota and he knows the
same thing would happen in Mon
tana if taken to a vote. So the
governor takes the easiest way
out and plays neutral. He is go
ing to leave it to the legislature
and pass the buck to them.
SO
HELENA, Oct.
24.—Governor
Cooney said todiay it is apparent
that means of raising additional
tax money to provide relief funds
must be devised at the special ses
sion next month of the Montana
legislature.
Explaining that he doe* not in
tend to make any specific recom
mendations as to what form the
additional taxation- shall take, the
chief executive said 1 he wiTl "leave
the matter to be 'worked out by
the legislature."
Although the governor said he
will not recommend any particular
taxation measures, discussions at
the statehouse centered 1 about a
sales tax. It remain* to be seen
what action, the assembly will
take if it is un instructed on this
point when it meets.
Governor Frank H. Cooney an
nounced yesterday that he would
include in his legislative call a
provision for the revision of the
motor vehicle license act to re
duce the fee on light cars to $5
as intended by the 1933 session.
The act was passed and approved
by the legislative assembly but an
error by an enrollment clerk kept
the license fee on smaller cars of
2,750 pounds or under at $10. The
case was taken to the state su
preme court 'which held that the
enrollment act must stand.
Four Definition*
The following will be definitely
indicated in the call of the ex
traordinary session, the governor
has said:
Creation of a water conserva
tion board so high that federal
fards may be secured for flood
control projects.
Taxation measures to the extent
of at lea*t $1,500,000 so that fed
eral relief funds may be obtained
by the state.
Appropriation for the state
liquor board to launch the state
liquor business and possible re
visions in the form of the pres
ent law.
Revi*ion of the motor vehicle li
cense act.
TAXPAYERS ASSN.
MET WEDNESDAY
The Sheridan County Taxpayers
Association, that somebody thot
was dead and gone, came to life
again Wednesday by holding its
an^al meeting at the court house.
The meeting was called to order
by R, R. Ueland of Antelope, hut
not very many were present and
it was decided to hold another
meeting in the near future.
This meeting went on record as
favoring hydro-electric tax, luxury
and cigarette tax, but being oppos
ed to a general sales tax.

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