OCR Interpretation


The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, November 24, 1933, County Edition, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1933-11-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

he.we n *
OF
.. »
THE PRODUCERS NEWS |CoantyEditkm
Read TW» P«£*
for New» of J"«
Cancellation Fight
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
PLENTYWOOD, SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA, NOVEMBER 24, 1933
Published Weekly
XVI- Number 35
Washington Recognizes
Govt, of Soviet Russia;
Crop Market Opened
Seen As Great Victory for Peace Policy of
Recognition
Workers' and Farmers' Government
NORMAL DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS AGREED
Orders for Cotton, Tertiles, Livestocks and Ma
chinery Wait Credit Arrangements
Soviet
D. C. On the ■ Litvinov- Roosevelt
Washington,
day of the seventeenth
of the existence of the
, T . r Cnoi allst Soviet Re
thf pîvernment Of
publics. tn K :*• n f_
!.. United States gave it of
ficial recognition. in
nouncement was made apoiu
tAn minutes before midnight,,
\ov. 17, by President Roose
velt before some 200 news
men who had haunted
ninth
year
the
paper
the White House press room
for many hours waiting for
this, the biggest news of the
capital city for months.
Pressent Roosevelt read to the
assembled newspapermen an
of letters between himself
ex
change , _ . _
and Maxim Ijtvmov, Peoples Com
missar of Foreign Affairs, who is
in this country to effect recogn
tbr,. The letter of the president
to Mr. Litvinov which put the offi
cial seal on the negotiations said:
"1 am very happy to inform
jou that as a result of our con
versations the government of
the United States has decided to
establish normal diplomatic re
latione with the government of
the Unkm of Socialist Soviet
Kepublics and to exchange am
bassadors.''
Millions in Orders
Or. the date that recognition was
up
ful
in
,
On the question of debts in the
annowced, former Senator Smith
W. Brookhart, special adviser to
the Agricultural Adjustment Ad
ministration stated that Soviet or
ders for $ 626 , 000,000 aire ready
and waiting only for the arrange
ment of credits. The first deals
with the Soviet governme"t, he
said, would be shipments of cotton,
cotton textiles, live stock and of
heavy machinery.
He considered that the cotton
shipments would come first with
exports of raw cotton worth from
$50,000.000 to $60,000,000, to be
fira'ced probably through AAA
credits. An additional order for
$30,000.000 in cotton textiles and
another $30,000,000 for live stock
are expected, he said.
Mr. Brookhaut placed great em
phasis on the credit safety of So
viet Russia,
credit risk than Wall Street," he
declared, and characterized the So
viet government as the most stable
«re i n Europe.
It's a far better
NEW SC0TBB0R0
TRIALS OPEN IN
m /\p « wj «T g-* wa
OF LYNCH
- 1
Negro Boys BrougKt to !
rWat.i*- 1
X H M b j
lalk threatens
:
LECATUR, Ala.—Seven of the
teottsbeiro boys here |
5 o'clock Mor.day evening in 1
«rtody of 20 Birmingham deputy
•beriffs, heavily armed. The Ne
Sroes, riding in four automobiles,
We r« preceded and followed by
*•* loaded with officers, carrying
Machine guns, sawed off shotguns,
^ automatic rifles.
W ith the new trials to begin
***• 27, the lynch spirit hangs
i a heavy cloud over the city.
investigator who has spent
wveral weeks in this town has
a n affidavit to hundreds of
*®n*ersatione in which local busi
es men aru } even National Guard
icers have expressed the threat
iFch the Scottsboro boys and
7* D- lawyers who repre
the defendants.
uby Bates, white girl who tea
r , as to the innocence of thé
hoys, has notified the I. L.
0 threats made against her
b.
life.
Monday, however, the
P n y.' Callahan, Sheriff J
•Hawking 0 f Jefferson county
«"Attorney General Thomas E
1 , ^fused to listen to the
5®* nd8 <* the I. L. D. for a
de * en d the Scotts
aSlT u n
, ' hareed that the
"rij plan* . k ". ow '
& VÄ
hav, T a J ld farmer a organization
finl w l arded the Alabama of
lew! w,th so ma *y letters and
Weve r. that they
S **" '«wed to throw a
the Stotte -
negotiations the
j Stateme. -t was issued that "There
has taken place an exchange of
views with regard to methods of
-«tog outstanding questions of
indebtedness and claims that per
mft us to hope {[)r a spee<ijr ^
satisfactory solution to these ques
j tiors." In the meantime, the U. S.
s. r. agrees to waive claims aris
ing out of the intervention by the
American troops in Siberia after
January, 1918.
The Soviet government restated
its principles of tolerance for all
forms of religious observance by
foreigners in Russia, and incident
ally pointed out the fixed principle
of religious liberty far all.
Oi the question of propaganda,
the Soviet government restated its
fixed policy to respect scrupuous
ly the indisputable right of the
United States to order its own life
u
within its own jurisdiction in its
own 'way and to refrain flrom inter
fering in any manner with the in
ternal affairs of the United
States.
same guarantee. This clause is
similar to that i r . effect between
Soviet Russia and other countries
with which diplomatic relations
are in effect.
M
Roosevelt supplied the
Soviet Peaöe Policy
The statement of Litvinov which
is echoed by Roosevelt, hopes that
"our nations may henceforth co
operate for their mutual benefit
for the preservation of the
peace of the world.
The emphasis on peace, which
bocn made by Litvinov, lights
the contention that the success
termination of recognition .ne
gotiations is a triumph for the
peace policy of the Soviet Union.
It is also regarded as a triumph
for the tremendous achievements
technical, material ard cultural
advance in the Soviet program of
socialist construction. The Soviet i
government has become such a
power that the United States gov
ernment could t.<o longer ignore
this socialist giant.
Exchange Ambassadors
Pres. Roosevelt has announced
that William C. Bullit, former Wil
son representative in Russia, will
be the American Ambassador at
Moscdw.
The Soviet government has pro
posed as its ambassador to Wash
ington the former Russian envoy
to Japan, Alexander Trovanovsky.
He has been accepted by the
United States.
yy
'"SVKÏÏIul
ST. PAUL, Minn.-Entrance to
the Armour and Co. packing plant
?;•
against the miserable conditions
which prevail in the packinghouse
William Schneiderman, the strike
leader, appealed to employes of
Swift, Cudahy and other packing
plarvts to join the strike.
1
Conference Votes to Unite Farmers' Weekly With The Producers News
he she
L.
By R. F. H.
A resolution consolidating the Farmers National Weekly,
SrÄÄÄ »
passed unanimously at the Farmers Second National Confer
ence at Chicago.
The consolidation was approved at an earlier meeting
of the United Farmers League execubvecounalandwa^
endorsed by a membership meeting of U. F. L. delegates at
the conference.
The new paper will be published at 1510 West 18th St.
Chicago Dl., with the first combined issue api^armg Jaji
iiurv is! The editorial staff will be composed of Erde Bert,
editor of the Producers News and Rob. F. Hall, editor of
the FNCA paper.
Walter Harju, speaking for the Workers and Farmers
Goonerative Unity Alliance, declared that his organization
Consider adding their monthly Bulletin to the merger.
the
J
E
the
a
will
For Unity in Fight
The consolidation was hailed as the most effective
methS of untying the ranks
the rl ^JEheir utmost efforts to get subscriptions, advertise
ow ' ments and contributions to launch the new paper, and to
SÄ * «S and better force in their fight for a better
standard of living. . ..
of- Vftte 0 f the conference meant that organizations
and .a,™ 6 numbering more than 130,000 swung behind
they y« th members number s farm The single
a th « formationofa sing organ of the u. F . L „ the
- 'k HlXr Association (Madison Co. Plan) the
GRANGE CONVENTION
IS SPLIT ON ISSUE OF I
CURRENCY INFLATION!
BOISE, Idaho—Delegates to the J
rational convention of the Grange j
were in sharp disagreement when!
the question of inflation came for- !
ward. Louis Taber, national mas
ten 1 , advocated a "controlled infla
tion" in his annual message. Ar- j
thur Sherman-, Rhode Island state ;
master, attacked inflation as un- j
sound and dangerous. Delegates, '•
made up for the most part of well
to-do farmers, were lining up be- i
bird the two different points of
view. •
The Grange passed a resolution
condemning farmers' mass action :
against foreclosures and on strike i
picket lines as "violence ard inti- \
midation. After the resolution was
the I
thought better of it and had the 1
resolution recalled. I
m EVERYTHING'!
SINGLER'S ADVICE
TO WIS. FARMERS
Calls Truce in Wisconsin;
Urges Farmers to "Stop
Buying
At a meeting at Madison, Wis.,
leaders of the Wisconsin Holiday
Association and the Milk Pool
voted to put an end to the strike
and called for a truce. Walter M.
Sirgkr attempted to blame the
farmers.
Why should we fight
out the battle to win higher prices
for those who refuse to join with
he exclaimed.
Meanwhile
us.
Singler is urging the farmers to
go on "a buying strike," as a Way
of bringing the money lords to
terms.
• Singler joined Arnold Gilberts,
the discredited head of the Wis
consin Holiday, in urging farmers
to sell everything possible and
convert their products into cash.
The object, they said, is "to reduce
bank deposits available for credit,
thereby sbrengtherdng the demand
for a two billion dollar currency
issue."
As a consequence of the strikes,
the Milk Trust is trying to pena
lize the militant farmers who were
active in the strike and have cut
at least 100 from their list.
Towards the end of last week,
North Dakota farmers were still
active. At Rock Lake, farmers
prevented a shipment of live stock
from leaving the city. A stock
car was pushed lown the tracks,
the stock yards locked, and a
loading platform torn down.
At Belfield Saturday, about 100
Holiday members turned back six
carloads of sheep and cattle, and
shipments of turkeys, cream wheat
and other farm products.
At Sioux City last Week, I. W.
Reck, president of the Sioux City
Milk Association set up by the
Holiday Association and other
groups of farmers, admitted that
he was a leading member in the
'Law and, Order' League which
had sent armed gangs out to the
picket lines to break the strike.
At a meeting of farmers, Reck
was able to push through a vote
calling off the milk strike in the
Sioux City area, although the op
position to surrender was vigorous.
Half of the 300 farmers present
did not vote.
Reck was exposed as an enemy
of the strike from the start. He
had wired to the governor, it de
veloped, that the farmers in the
association were rot in favor of
strike. He admitted this, and then
launched into an attack on "vio
lence and vandalism.
»?
i
Farmers of 36 States Unite
To WinQDebt Cancellation
I


p|
|p

tgflj
H
II


I :
w
Mi
.
1
I
i <S
m 1
im:
;
, v . -y > . ..
SEV - - .
-V>$C<vXe.-. .
- ■
LAW AND ORDER" GANGS ORGANIZED TO BREAK STRIKE
This was the sc'-ne as striking farmers near Sioux City. la., faced shotguns in the hands of mem
bers of the Law and Order League, an organization formed for the purpose of breaking the strike.
Milk association officials admitted they had joine l the strike breaking league and forced through a
motion ending the Sioux jCitv picketing. Clubs, the farmers had found, were no match for shotguns.
—(Federated Pictures).
-,
Ü
! ■■
Pi;
wi
vi
■y
\m.
I
s
I
- -— nri ini,
m
4 ]

V. ,,X
inf
ft*
M
I

i
m
■y ' ■?.
ÿ/yy '
&
'&**
>
vi
*****
&
TT'X
i J* - .
; ';Ayy>..
[ fit
• -X •
Hi
>•
;£ :
-
fi' r*l
*
MM
r
mii
I
m
X*
>
■yy
m
V.
1
m
■■
M
t
m

m

&
m
FARMERS SEIZE EIGHT CARS OF STOCK
At Lawton. Iowa. 200 Holiday farmers commandeer«d eight livestock cars, which the North
western Railroad had picked up between Carroll and Lawton, and was taking to market. It took dep
uty sheriffs 24 hours to corral the steers, pigs, and lambs which the strikers released from the cars.
The Holiday farmers agreed to help catch the stock providing it was sent back home, rot to market.
UNITY OF ALL TOILERS IS
KEYNOTE OF CONFERENCE
Canadian Farmer Says
unity between farmers and work
ers. This was demonstrated even
before the farmers arrived by the
offer of the Workers International
Relief, the Unemployed Councils
and the International Workers Or
der to arrange for the feeding of
the delegates. The homes of the
•fry
Boundary Lines
Must Go
CHICAGO, III.—If there Was
any one outstanding feature of the
Farmers Second National Confer
ence which closed here Sunday
after a four-day session, it was
unity.
First there was unity between
the farmers themselves. The dele
gates represented 68 different or
ganizations, incluling the old line
organizations such as the Grange,
the Farm Bureau, the Farmers
Union, the Milk Pool. They came
from 36 states, north east south
and west. There were grain farm
ers from the northwest, cotton
farmers from the south, potato
farmers from Oregon, fruit, truck,
vegetable growers, dairy farmers,
poultry farmers. They were united
on the immediate and burning
need for relief.
Ini the second place, there was
|\j ew Enlarged Organ of Toiling Farmers to Begin Publi- i
cation January 15 ; Immediate Support
Is Needed
United Fanners Protective Association, the Michigan Farm
ers League, the Sharecroppers Union, as well as many or
ganizations which are not yet so large as those named. As
3rik Bert pointed out in reporting for the committee on Fi
nance and Organization, the new Farmers Weekly will be
more than the official organ of these various organizations
—it wifl be the organ of the toiling farmers of America, or
ganized and unorganized, and regardless of whether they
are members of the militant fighting organizations or
whether they are members of the old line farm organiza
tions.
100,000 Circulation Is Aiin
Bert speaking for the proposed consolidation, declared
that no militant farm paper could consider itself effective
in the farmers fight until its circulation numbered 100,000
We Eld be satisfied with nothing less than
this figure," declared Ben. "If every farmer, if every or
ganization, if every local represented here, begins at once
active drive for subscriptions, advertisements, greet
ings, and contributions, we can go forward together, for a
real fighting paper, a real national newspaper representing
the interests of the impoverished and militant farmers of
America."
The delegates cheered when the vote was taken and
when the call for pledges was made, hundreOE of pledges
were brought to the speakers platforms. Each delegate made
readers.
c <
m an
Chicago workers were thrown open
to more than 600 farmers.
Workers Greet Farmers
In the name of the Trade Union
Unity League, Herbert Newton
greeted the conference at its open
ing. He was followed by other
speakers, J. E. McDonald of the
Railroad Brotherhoods Unity
Movement, Alice Yonick of the
Workers International Relief, and
Donald Henderson of the Agricul
tural Workers Industrial Union.
[
On Friday evening, a huge mass
meeting was held at the Coliseum
with more than 4,000 Chicago
workers in attendance. Speakers
representing both the farmers and
the 'workers addressed the meet
ing, which closed with an addnress
by Clarence Hathaway, who spoke
in the rame of the Communist
Party.
Striking Cotton Picker
There were 36 farm workers
seated as delegates at the confer
ence. One of their number, who
came direct from the cotton pick
ers* strike in California, spoke be
fore the conference, pledging the
support of the farm workers to
the small and middle farmers in
their struggles against Finance
Capital. He was enthusiastically
applauded.
Then there was another unity,
the unity of the Negro an<d 'white
farmers.
When the delegation of Negro
and white sharecroppers from the
South arrived Thursday morning
and filed into the aulitorium, the
delegates broke into applause
which lasted for ten minutes.
answer to a demand from the dele
gate the delegation took its place
on the platform and Joe Burns,
Negro member of the Sharecrop
pers Union from Alabama, spoke
to the farmers.
Delegates Sing "Solidarity"
On the platform, the Negro dele
gates were greeted by the white
croppers from Texas, Arkansas,
Florida and Alabama. As Negro
and white shook hands, as a sym
bol of their fighting unity, the
delegates broke into the song
Solidarity.
The Negro spokesman finished
his short talk with the words:
yy
u
i
A white farmer from Florida
followed. He described the terror
down south and showed how there
is discrimination against the farm
ir< the (regulations for dipping
"We pledge our whole hearted
support to the conference. We
shall go back to Alabama to
.fight for greater unity between
black and white farmeijs against
Roosevelt and the New Deal."
ers
(Continued on Page two)
a definite pledge as to how many subscriptions
would secure before January 1, 1934.
Every Farmer Must Help
The subscription price adopted was $1.50 for one year,
90 cents for six months, and 50 cents for three months, with
commission allowed to cover the expenses of the sub-getters.
Delegates were commissioned to get their locals to dis
cuss this question and to make a collective pledge to build
the paper. The following directions were adopted to be put
into effect at once:
To build our FARMERS WEEKLY into the weapon which we
need, we set ourselves these tasks:
(a) by getting subscriptions »rd selling individual copies, to make
every farmer in the community a.regular reader,
(b) to get every farmer who is interested in the paper to become
active booster in spreading the circulation among his
neighbors.
(c) to get together with other farmers and write collective news
reports of conditions and activities in the community, and to
send in to the paper criticism and suggestions which •will help to
improve it.
(d) to have pamphlets and literature available for sale at all
times.
(e) to work out ways and means of raising finances through
affaire, socials, dances, lebates, collections at mas s meetings, and
direct donations from individuals and organizations.
(f) to solicit advertising from local merchants and to get the
farmers to bring pressure upon local merchants so that they
will do this.
(g) to solicit paid "Greetings" advertisements from inlividuals,
organizations, and local merchants upon the occasion of the
first issue of our newly amalgamated FARMERS WEEKLY. Lists
for such "Greetings" advertising will soon be furnished.
Unexpired subscriptions to both the Farmers National
(Continued on page 2)
an
>
DELEGATES CHEER AS VOTE
OF CONFERENCE IS TAKEN;
CALL TO ACTION IS ISSUED
Farmers Second National Conference Builds United
Front for Immediate Relief
DEMANDS CASH RELIEF FOR NEEDY
Solidarity With Negro Sharecroppers Is Unanimously
Supported at Chicago
CHICAGO, Ill.—The powerful support of a nation-wide
movement of impoverished farmers was swung into line be
hind the clear-cut demand for complete cancellation of se
cured farm debts when the Farmers Second National Con
ference voted unanimously in favor of demand No. 2
posed
as pro
UJADVTDC UftTT l
VVlmMittO fUiL 111/
W ... ... ... . .. .
H1TIFR HF^PITF
1U1 LdulV 1/Lul 11L j
rpimnAn Af Ml'IVC
IlKKUK Ul N ALLj
Fascist Doctor Figures of
Returns for Fake
Election
BERLIN—The so-called election
in Fascist Germany on Nov. 12
proved to be a fake election^ as
even the capitalist papers like the
Margan-controlkd New York Eve
ning Post had to admit.
In Zwickal it was reported that
seven members of a religious sect
were arrested for refusing to vote
and for distributing handbills bear
ing the words,
Jesus is Ouïr
Leader." Cases like this, where
workers refused to vote for any
reason occurred on a large scale
all over Germany. People we«re
literally forced to vote at the
sVord'a point. The Nazi Storm
Troopers scoured the houses in all
the cities, dragging workers down
to the polls. -
Yet in spite of this widespread
terror and intimidation, the re
sults of the election proved that
the workingclass movement has
not been crushed and that in the
face of unheard-of terror, millions
of workingmen had the courage to
defy the gallows ard the ax and
openly show, either by not voting
or by voting against the Nazis,
their hatred of Hitler and the cap
italists.
Almost 4,000,000 voters stayed
away from the polls, nearly one
tenth of the total qualified voters.
Another 3,348,362 voters had their
ballets disqualified from the count
because they were "spoiled." To
quote ore correspondent: "What
tales of heroism these ballots tell!
How many thousands wrote such
slogans of "Down with the Hitler
Murder Regime! Long live the
Communist Party! For a Soviet
Germany! Release the brave Di
mitrof, Torgler, Taneff and Pop
off!" will be known only to the
Nazi scoundrels."
Saturday
Alfred Tiala, national secretary
0f the United Farmer s League,
read the recommendation of the
resolutions committee to the 702
farmer Agates from 36 states,
assembled in the Peoples Auditor
ium her€ * Coirn farmers from Ne
b , raska ' Ne S ro sharecroppers from
the South, dairy farmers from
Pennsylvania, and' wheat farmers
from the northwest took the floor
to insist that neither inflation, re
financing nor moratoriums offered
ary solution to the problems of the
busted farmers,
the only answer," they said.
A few minuus later when the
Chairman Charles E, Taylar called
for a vote, the answer was a
cheering chorus of "Ayes."
No Tribute to Mortgage
«
Cancellation is
"We do -rot propose any longer
to take food from the mouths of
our children in order to pay a
tribute to wealthy mortgage hold
ers," the resolution read. "Mora
toriums do not give us the
required securing, refinancing
schemes do not help the great
mass of impoverished farmers, and
.
iuUution proves to be o r ly a new
snar e with »which the profiteers
ho Pe extract bigger profits from
us -
"We demand cancellation of
secured debts, mortgages, back
rents, delinquent taxes, and seed
and feed loans of the impov
erished small and middle farm
ers."
The conference called for a
"united struggle of all exploited
and busted farmers, regardless of
race, creed or political opinions"
to win this demand for cancella
tion as well as the six other de
mands raised' at the conference.
Organized Debt Strike
An organized campaign to re
fuse to pay secured farm debts,
mortgages, delinquent taxes, and
back rents was launched by the
conference, to be backed up by the
organized strength of the desti
tute farmers in every community.
Thi s united action, it was pointed
out is the only method by which
foreclosures, evictions, and tax
sales can be stopped.
The first demand to be adopted
called for immediate cash relief for
all needy farmers, "in order to
live and continue production."
<<
For all other toiling farmers,
the conference decided, "we de
mand production credit without
collateral and without interest. We
demand the distribution of surplus
(Continued on page 2)
UFL MEMBERS URGED
TO ARRANGE MEETS
FOR CONF. REPORTS
v" n
1
VIRGINIA, Minn.—A plea to all
U. F. L. members to begin at once
arranging meetings of fanners to
heat the reports of delegates to
the Farmers Second National Con
ference has been issued by Hjal
mer Johnson, acting county secre
tary of the U. F. L.
Reports should be made pri
marily in those communities which
do not have active Ü. F. L. locals,
declares Johnson, and UFL mem
bers must take the initiative, go
into these communities and make
arrangements for a report meet
ing.
Tn every local, able farmers
should be elected and instructed to
arrange meetings. All farm orga
nizations Should be approached to
help with the meetings, in order
that the program of the confer
ence can be carried to as many
farmers as possible.
At every repart meeting, the
secretary urges, a talk should be
made on the United Farmers
League, its program and its rec
ord of struggles for the interests
of the impoverished and exploited
farmers.
\

xml | txt