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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, March 30, 1934, Image 1

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■«-SSrfS
H&U EW^'l
-i »
HI«'
OF
f
Become a Correspondent
to the Producers News
Your Neighbor to
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Get
»!
SubrO*«
The Paper of the Oppressed and Exploited
PLENTY WOOD, SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA, MARCH 30, 1934
Published Weekly
XVIL Number 1
Ind ian Councils nave No
Confidence in Government
BID of Indian Rights
»
u
ftot Believe Sweet Talk of Indian Agent, What
Comes from Washington "Does Not
Sound the Same"
Oo
The Indian Reform Bill, or the "bill of Indian rights,
, is hailed by Commissioner John Collins, which has re
48 1,, been introduced to the House by Representative How
'S is being discussed far and wide at every Indian council.
And the more the Indians talk about it the less they like it.
Indian Council *
M
Blackfeet
visited Washington and then
with the councils of o'her
tribes at the conference of West
Indians at Rapid City, S. D.
Numerous meetings have been held
at Browning, Old Agency and at
gf-art Butte agency to discuss the
The
has
met
era
bilL
Feel* Very Doubtful
That the sweet words of the
M mniissioLer are regaided as
nothing hut the ringing of empty
fr-ils is being admitted m the cap
falist preis. We quote from the
Gnat Falls Tribune of March 25;
•'Litt'e Blaze was questioned
after one of the meetings and he
said: T do not feel good. When
was at Rapid City the talk of the
commissioner sounded good and
felt hapo.r, but now when I am at
home and 1 hear about the things
that come from Washington it does
the same and I cannot
not
tdl which to believe'." j
It does not sound the same and,
it is not the same what comes from •
Washington no matter how Click' y
the .-ommissioner is trying to cover j
it will honeyed sweetness.
In le past the government has ■
made many changes in the handling)
of Indian affairs and again and
again the Indians have been sold '
out and betrayed. They have lost
had any confidence in
or never
what "comes from Washington."
A part of the plan of the gov
ernment for many years has been
to issue rations of food and cloth
ing. "relief' to ( hose in want. Each
weekend, groups gather at the gov
ernment warehouses at the agency
to receive these bare necessities.
Sometimes thousands are patiently
waiting for hours 4 o get their
share.
!
Like Getting Rations
When asked about his opinion of i
the rew plan Running Weasel ;
seratrhed a picture to show his
idea of the slight distinction in the
proposed new plan and the old
He showd Unde Sam With an
Indian on his knee telling him that
■* chringp is being made. 'Instead
of thr> little white beans that have
be- nnrf of your ration since the
tire § first was given to you,' ;
«ays- Tnclr Sam to the Indian, !
»low receive brown
T? L-ono you will appreciate
one.
lb cliange.*
^rdipns when asked about
rinn of the new hill stated
not unde^s' and it
•v to bo for it or to give
about it.
T 3 ''» Tudfar Toform Bill nret'nds
" elf frovemment" and
tTo' timed on Page Two>
■r
i
ttr* ri.
•COMPETITIVE" EXAMINATION
FOR POSTMASTER ANNOUNCED
PLENTYWOOD, March 26.—
L'Pdj request of the U. S. Civil j
pub- !
"To fill the vacancy in the po
sition of pos mÏÏter hi this city
United StaChS ServW Com
«-ion £ «SScSTiSî
quett of the Postmaster General
*nd in accordance with an order of
tfe President, an open competitive
tiamina io r ^ competitive
,. T .
io be eligible for the examina
Z. 'J n t. ap ? lcant must 06 a atl *
gidf lî e Unite d States, must re
post m < t llvery of S"!,
for , e : must have 80 reside J d
W tLTe nCX i preC ^I
of ™ ,- • for close of weipt
applications, must be in good
tew and " ith '" the
«wriT'* aire b ? lts - 8001 men
•» are admit(ed ,
Under the terms of the Execu
» der, the Civil Service Com
ttission win certify to the Post
te t(r General the names of the
gehest three qualified eligibles, if
Jf ma ny as hree are qualified,
» which the Postmaster Gen
J ? 1 niay select one for nomina
o n h y the President. Confirma
,. n b v the Senate is the final ac
ttfn -
A Pplicarts win not be geauired
a^enHe in a«
for scholastic tests hut will
^ rated on tViciw
torirj? edUc ^ tio îl and
Tl '" Civil ^e^doTr an ^ / itn 2n
r V * 5-nt am on?T^e^
«^Ui Uti. amonpr représenta
•- w te " 8 ar "* mf—l»*l
*"'-*reteîS conr ? ra ' ,,ff ^
re ' ability, and character
Service Commission
listing the following
®ert regardig applications for the
Position 4s postmaster of this
we are
announce
city.
to

HUNTING GOPHERS
DALE HEIBERG, 9,
IS SHOT IN HEAD
! DAGMAR, March 26.—Dale Hei
! berg, nine-year-old son of Chris
Heiberg, farmer at Dagmar, and
his wife Agnes, was shot in the
head by his bro her Myron, 7 while
trapping gophers near their fath
ers farm, Saturday afternoon,
While out on the fields the two
j little Heiberg boys got together
with some neighbor kids who were
I • ou- gunning for gophers. They
! we r e talking and a .22 rifle was
j lying on the ground. Little My
| ro n picked it up and the shot went
off, hitting the head of his brother,
Dale received first medical at
ten' ion from Dr. Turner of Medi
cine Lake. The boy had lost a
considerable amount of blood and
had been delkious until Monday
the Plentywood hospital,
An x-ray picture taken at the
hospital revealed tba + the skull is
fractured and that part of the
bullet is still in the head. His con
dition is reported to be extremely
serious, especially since his heart
is in bad condi 1 ion.
His father and mother have been
at his bedside ever since.
when Dr. Turner ordered him sent
NOTICE
TO ALL REEMPLOYMENT
OFFICES
To all County Managers;
Your atten ion has been directed
at different times, as to the cor
rect procedure to follow in ser.d
ing men from your county to an
other county,
Mr. W. L. Cain, our manager at
Glasgow, Montana, informs me
tha . 4 large numbers of men are
coming to Glasgow with letters
and introduction cards from the
various managers,
As our instructions plainly state,
you must not give anyone an intno
duction card to go to work outside
of your county, and these car s
arc not to he given until you hav%»
first received a requisition from
our Helena office,
sihle at the present time to place
on this project, I ask
It is impos
anyone
you*v coopéra ion in this matter.
National Re r mployment Service
By W. T, Bridges,
Associate Director.
Helena. Mo"t March 24. 1934
of each applicant, and the evidence
thus secured will be considered in
determining the ratings to be as
signed to the applicants.
"The Commission states that
presidential postmasters are not in
the classified civil service and that
its duties in connection with
appointments to such positions are
to hold examinations and to certify
the resulte to ^ Postmaster Gen
eral. The Commission is not In
terested in the political, religious,
or fraternal affiliations of any ap
pUcfmt ,
"Full information and applica
ü(m blar)ks may ^ obtained from
the secretary of the local board
of dvil s0rvice examine r 8 at the
post office in this ci 4 y, or from
the United States Civil Service
Commission, Washington. D. C."
1 The position of postmaster is
roTmected ^th a salary of $2,400
Alth^S Z C. S. C.
emphasizes that it is not interested
I " litiCTl , religious, or fra
ternal affüiations of any appli
C ant" it is not very likely that
any body else hut a strong adber
e nt of the "democratic" Republi
will be pw into this position,
T he government also strongly
recommends that veterans of the
different wars or their widows
an d wives be given preference ui
the aunointment as postmaster.
lo owever t bis "recommendation"
can only be resided as a farce.
Th* '"worst exploiting chiselerr in
America" as the postal employees
, •' Poctmaste" General
; al1 h i : he *lad to ap
J Tf Far J e banVer who^during the
an? ^urd
war kept him^it a «
rftb,
"r '17
1 "democratic" nariv
i
OHIO FARMERS AT
CONVENTION VOTE
U.F.L. AFFILIATION
CLEVELAND, Ohio—Affiliation
to the United Farmers League was
unanimously agreed upon at the
first state convention of the Ohio
Farmers League which took place
here March 17, 18. The désira
hilf y of such affiliation with the j
only nationwide militant farm or
gamzation was recognized by all !
of the delegates through their dwn
experiences.
I - npT ,; n p. thp. rorevpmfinn TKnm '
AÄTÄ m
Home and Landowners Association,
pointed out that 6,000 parcels of
farm property in Cuyahauga (in
which Cleveland is located) are to
he offered for sale 'his month, in-l
dicatirg that the farmers of Ohio
are faced with mas? dispossession
and eviction.
John Marshall, executive secre
6,000 Forced Sales Sched
uled for March in One
Ohio County
6,000 Forced Sales
, ,, TTr , T ,, .
I °L lt • 2* T 'S
port of the convertie showed
graphically the necessity for he
tCfamere m S )°"de
New Deal he pointed out, the con
dirions of the Ohio farmers have
become worse instead of better.
A sta'e executive board of the
state of Ohio. United Farmers
League was elected with John Mar
shall as Executive Ser'etarv.
LION DOESN'T ROAR BIT' HUNGRY DO
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The British Lion at Trafalgar Square was silent but the thousands of unemployed demonstrating
against governmental niggardliness roared their demand for food as this pic ure was snapped. The
rising tide of protest is shown as one after another government supporters go down in electorial
pter
i,» : j
(
m
defeats .
Farm
s^*
t*
.Dor
«i ö
Donate Tons of Food to Strikers; Solidarity Is Shown by
'
m
A . 1
; Loggers
KW r* HM|
Fishermen, Longshoremen, and Street
Railway Workers
v
VANCOUVER, B. C.—The farmers of Fraser Valley
and of Vancouver Island are delivering tons of vegetables in
the support of the strike of 500 loggers, working in the
highball camps" of the Bloedel Stewart Welsh Co. on Van
- T » j
COUver Island,
The are striking for an *
4
increase of their miserable wages.
When the company attempted to
break the stinke by shifting then
orders to other camps these camps
•— »£ «*** ^ a S ^
patny stnice.
Workers and farmers of all the
races have given Vondrefui expres
sions of solidity with the stnk
ing loggers. Fishermen are coop
erating by debvenng food stuffs
and other supplies in their boats
to the strikers. The longshoremen
and street railway men are giving
financial rapport.
The Chinese and Japanese farm
ers i n particular responded
cellently to the call for assistance
of the strike commit ee. They are
delivering food as nraeh as they
are able to .part with
Against the solidarity «fjork
ers and farmers are
forces of the company. Company
papers are spr^ding sländerous
sta'ements regarding the strike.
The Vancouver City Council has
declared illegal all canvassing for
food and financial donations m the
attempt to starve out the strikers.
Police has attempted to break up
the picket lines.
As the strike continues need for
assistance is becoming more and
more desperate. The strike com
mittee is widening its appeal and
is calling upon all workers and
farmers organizations 4 o help the
strikers.
All donations are to he sent to
«.M 50. 160 Harting«
amt, w„ Vareouver. B. C.
ex
APPLICATION BLANKS
FOR SEED LOANS ARE
BEING DISTRIBUTED
PLENTYWOOD, March 28.—A
C. Erickson, attorney, who has
been hired by the county to assist
farmers in making out application
for feed ar.d seed loans, has appli
cation blanks ready now, it is an
nounced.
Blanks have also been sent to
the local committees scattered all
over the county so that farmers
do not need to come to Plentywood
ito »receive instructions and blanks,
The local committees are the same ,
»at handled the seed loans last;
yea r I
who n<ipd seed
seems to be K™* !
STS j
account of that.
- |
T w -„„n , . W YFR i
T ' W ' GREER ' LAWYER
MOVED TO WH1TEFISH
;
On Saturday, T. W. Greer, long
a Plentywood at orney, kft for the
western part of the stale where he
intcnds to reai<k and enBaRr in the ;
practîce of j aw at White fish. I
A load of his eqnipmert and of-1
flee supplies was sent by ruck.
Mr. Greer is well known in the
north'astern part of Montara,
where be is regarded as ore of the
most able lawyers, always ready to
give his client the full benefit of
bis wide knowledge and experience,
j
A 4 the same time, says the La
hor News, miners in Butte were
prid in beans, macaroni and fat
salt nork for building a greens
at. the State S-hool of
1>ev had to stan*' in line and He
Invented to -et. coal and doth
in* frr- children, in the name
t-- Viod^. Tnvectl-
tlm.
rereren. —on. Rail* w« êmM
t" . v— „ ta V a ragi-al.
MONT. MINERS GET
BEANS, $252,670:
ARE PAH) TO BOSS
lt ,
Workers Stand in Line to
i
Get Food for
Children
BUTTE, Mont.—Even though
the Anaconda Copper Co. "couldn't
afford to run its mines in 1932"
and many miners had to live on
charity, Pres. C. F. Kelly of the
company did not have to. subsist
on bean rations that year, The
Montara Labor News of Butte
pointa out.
Evidence of this is contained In
an A^reiated Press dispatch of
Feb. 26 which the Butte Daily
Standard forgot to print- R a l so
show*! that Kelly was paid $252,
670 m salary and bonus in the
worst year the copper industry has
seen.
IWAPHINCÇ CflRfF
HiÂtlUrtEO rUIUX
TENANT FARMERS
TO LEAVE LAND
rUfc>1 ' rexas - "be manner m
which machinery is driving farm
era from the land is exemplified by
iseveral recent cases in the South
pi|dns country of Texas.
landowner had dis
iarge iana °wnc- naa ais
P 018 ** 1 ^ 016 tenants who for
ÏÂS
tractors. Two others have set 10
and " re u f" B thK ® tractors. Two
[more wealthy operators hare aJeo
leised two sections in addition to
"' h!lt 'I' 65 ' Ctt "? * e
go ard using two tractors with
lri ' ' I 1 '
18 Men in Texas Operate
22,500 Acres of
Cotton
In one community there are 18
individuals operating 22,500 acres.
This is repeated in o her sections
Cotton is the
«*. *•>« »"***■
P™cipal crop.
An energetic farm family can
"• 160 arres in
/ m '
Wliat is to become of these ten
rWt. fanv? and t v eir wives and
chi'dren \vorrie? he landlords
.little. Tris question ''imply is
arited.
!
!
CATTLE WHIP USED
ON IOWA FARMER
j
!
i
i
Doctor Gets Worst of It
i
j
i
BY HORSE DOCTOR
When Farmer Hits
Back
veterinarian, attacked Sam Hewitt
a farmer of this community, with a
cat le whip when the farmer re
fused to let him make a tuberculin
test of his cows at that particular
time.
By a Farmer Correspondent
BATAVIA, la.—H. A. Bell,
, ,
leave his whip at home m the fu
^ e^neciaHy since: othey farm
ers have promised, him a »rood
^ -are than bg rerelv* at tbe
a
Hewitt; had just received notice
hat his sister was dying at the
Ottumwa hospital when Bell ap
peared at the farm, demanding to
give the test at once. When the
farmer told him the reason why he
had no time now and thai he was
getting ready to leave for the hoe*
pital, the veterinarian apparently
thought that he should make the
farmer fit for the hospital. With
, ,
the heavy steel end of his 15-foot
catlte whip he hit Hewitt over the
head without much of an argu
ment.
It seems that the horse doctor
had come to the wrong address be
lift the whip again, he felt the
farmer's two lirts crrehing against
his jaws and scull bones. Hewitt
finall knocked him off the farm.
^ has come to a prf tty pass
when state employees can come to
a farm and ugc t h e old cattle whip
on a farmer. There was much re
sentment among the farmers of
this neighborhood a^out this occur
ence, however most of them were
satisfied 'hat the farmer got the
be*t of the horse doctor.
It is expected that Pell will
cause suddenly, before he could
Hewi't farm.
NEW RELIEF PROGRAM
IS ATTEMPT TO LIMIT
RELIEF WORK TO FEW
>o.
;n
iirnnnnn
V f fill N C NFliRftFS
^ 1 U viiU ilLVJlIvUJ
i I DC HJU1DDCD DV
AKt YY HIiIEU Dl
1 /VIOQ I A MTU AD IT
MISS * LANDLORD
°" e H" to Pa y MuIe
That was Killed by
Truck
By a Farmer Correspondent
OXFORD, Miss.—I am writing
a le ter concerning a little trouble
between a Mr. J. D. Butler, a
white man, and his three Negro
workers. Mr, Butler lives in town
and has two of them on his farm.
He told these Negroes to put his
"rules in the pasture and they did,
"j*? ** " ght *• mal " got
üUt °, f the Pâture. One got run
over by a truck and broke his hind
*'_ 8 S * Mr. Butler went out to the
Negroes and wihipped them. One
of his men moved; off the place
! ut l " 6 °the*r one didnt have sense
enough to move. Mr. Butler told
them not 'o say anything about
the whipping he gave them.
He told the Negro who stayed
hat he would have to pay for the
mule.
•t. ■ t«r.i it 1 %. .
Together With 1.L.D, Law
»rmtr wft«» .
NEW YORK, March 23. Upon
request of the farmers of Roberts
! S. D., the American Civil
! Liber ies Union has entered the
CIVIL LIBERTIES
i UNION HELPS IN
I INJUNCTION HGHT
yers Arthur Garfield
Hayes Prepares Brief
to contest the injunction
which compells the United Farm
ers League, the Unemployed Coun
! cils and individual farmers to re
j f'-ain from organizing and similar
j activities, it was announced today.
^he Civil Liberties Union
j poses the injunc ion on the grounds
I "that mere words as well as acts
1 are enjoined, that the present or
j der was issued against the farm
case
i
°P
ers without notice or hearing, that
'he injunction seems to be an ef
1 fort to smash a farmers' organi
! zation at a time when the New
Deal is encouraging
groups to organize.
••
Joining with attorneys of the
Intematioral Labor Defense in |
preparing the brief for the hear- ;
rings March 27 a»~e Ar bur Gar- j
field Hays, re-known attorney who '
has just returred from Germany
where he participated in the Reich
stag Fire Trial. A. L. Wmn, at
tomey of Los Angeles ant* Jerome
Hellerstein, of the International
Judicial Association, New York.
This is 'he first injunction, to
knowledge," Roger Baldwin,
director of the A.C.L.U. explained,
"that ha« been issued to prevent
fanners from organizing their
campaign against foreclosures and
evictions. We have fought the
efforts of property interests to use
the courts in labor disputes. We
shall make the same fight in the
This sweeping re
our
aut hority from the Argentine gov
^ ment to work day and night
, of « urirent ord<r8
shifts, because of urgent ord.
farm areas.
straining order was issued without
hearing or notice. It enjoins dis
cussion of con 4 roversial issues.
mere words as well as acts. It is
plainly an effort to smash a mili
tant farmers' organization at a
time when the New Deal is en
couraging all economic groups to
organize. The excuse that the
injunction will restrain only illegal
acts is without merit. This is the
usual defense of judges usurping
arbitrary power.
-
^< 5 ^ , n ._ N ew s reaching
_ .,_~
here from Buenos »
j America, indicates that Swift
Armour Packing companies are ,
filling large orders for canned
mea i g f roTn Japan as a part of
j apan »_ nreparations for war.
_ .
A dispatch to tbe Chicago
Tribune states that packing plants
in b w „ os Aires, owned by Swift
a n d Armour companies, requested
PACKERS FILL BK
JAP WAR ORDER
• from Japan.
\>
Local Efforts Attempt to Cut Number of Working Hours
More Than Provided in Program
\
MISSTATEMENTS
Cash Pay Will Only Be Exceptional in Rural Areas,
State Relief Director States
PLENTYWOOD, March 28.—The new relief program
for the state of Montana that goes into effect on Monday,
was explained today by state relief director T. C. Spaulding
at the state planning conference at Helena.
The program is an effort to give relief to as few people
as possible, and more than ever will farmers and workers
have to fight to see that all persons who need relief really
get it.
While the program definitely*
states the minimum hours of work
for every relief worker per month
efforts are made here to misin
form the people and cut the work
down to an even smaller number
of hours as is already provided for
in the program.
500 IOWA FARMERS
HOLD PENNY SALE
*
Mistake?
WATERLOO, Iowa.—Five hun
dred farmers of Black Hawk coun
In its main article in the issue
22 the Her
of Plentywood
ald states that the maximum hours
of work shall "in no case exceed
24 hours per week." If this is not
deliberate misinformation it is at
least a mistake that should be cor
rected immediately by a statement
of the proper officials.
In his address the state relief
director pointed out definitely that
No persop shall be employed in
; work divisions less than 54 hours a
month nor less than three days i n
any one week."
It will be the policy of the re
lief administration 4 o refuse to ex
,. , ,...
! tend , relief , famil y J" 1 "*
to plant and properly care for an
adequate garden when the faeflî
j ties therefore are available," Mr.
! Spaulding explained.
! The new program for the State
of Montana as it effec's urban
areas, he said, is designed to pro
jo"bs for needy unemployed on
a
a
planred projects. In rural areas
the administration "will endeavor"
ma iç e it possible for destitute
|
elirible for relief" to sus
(I
peinons
tain themselves 'hrough their own
efforts.
The phrase "eligible for relief"
_ can only mean that not every per
son who is destitute will receive
relief. It will he up to the ad
ministration to de' ermine w r ho
eligible no matter how destitute
family may he.
Spaulding failed to outline what
(rontirncfl on Paire two)
Leaders oi Farmers Union
Refuse to Support Tiaia
Case, N. I). Farmer Says
5
President of Local Thinks That Arrest of Tiaia "Is Pub
licity Stunt of the Communists,
Refuses to Act
»>
Glenbum, N. D.
March 23, 1984
!
Producers News:
In compliance with your (request j
for help in making a good, inter
esting paper I wiU inform you re
garding some of my experiences in
our struggle for human rights. ;
1 attended the monthly meeting
of our Township Farmers Union,
and, before the meeting, I told the
president about the Warsaw, Ind.
affair and asked him if he would
give me an opportunity to present
the poor Indiana farmest' case
against their mistreatment. He re
plied favorably and said that he
needed help himself at that time,
At the proper time at 'he meet
ing 'I announced that th* poor
farmers of Indiana were in trouble
and had requested us to help them
and tha 4 : I would read the press
account of wha 4 had happened.
u snappy » i was surprised at
this because I bad exptded that ^
worth nf a reasonable amount of
V The presidfn .. is velT ^
him<5eIf but j suppose he had his
ir structions. !
It seemed that their social pro
gram for the evening was more
important to them than helping the
„p^hors in 'rouble.
When I bad read about half of
fh* account in the Producers News,
he shut me off and told me they
rouM allow no more tl^e for the
mtiH-pr and asked me what T would
„„rrfrre* fbftt sh.OP Id Vft doPC.
ctimnNf c * 4 that fi'ev make C. E.
Tailor's letter to President Roose

"Make it Snappy
The president asked me to "make
X
ty a successful "Sears,
Roebuck" sale to save John Kaa
ren, a tenant fairmer and his fanf
ily from utter destitution.
It was the first penny sale in
Black Hawk county and when J.
A. Allen, 1 he landlord who held a
$1,380 writ of attachment against
Kaaren's property, came to the
sale he felt quite happy to see so
many potential buyers present.
Allen was accompanied by his
attorney and a deputy sheriff.
When the bidding started it hap
pened that he always found him
self far away from the auctioneer.
The same happened to his attorney
who tried to lift his voice in order
to be beard by 4 he sheriff. Strong
elbows of farmers pushed in front
of them and crowded them into the
background.
Milk coVs brought from 50 cents
to $2.25 apiece. A bull ard three
horses sold for $1 each. One crib
of com brought 7 cents per bushel
and another 10 cents.
The sheriff finally stopped the
sale when a few head of hogs and
some hay was left. Immediately
the farmers removed everything
from the premises that they had
bought.
It w r as said that the telephone
lire o the farm had been cut when
the sale started.
Allen's attorney said that legal
steps would be taken to recover
t v e property.
is
a
velt their letter to the President
and Hans Hardersen's resolution
their resolution to the State and
county officials,
Did Nothing
The president answered that he
bad noticed that I was reading
from the Producers News and that
the Producers News had stated at
one time that the Farmers Union
was a "lool of Wall Street and he
knéw "that was a lie" and one of
the two richest residents of the
township wondered 'if they weren't
getting into something,' etc. and
he believed the whole thing was
simply "a publicity stunt of Corn
munists," and that was the "hypo"
that anesthised the crowd. Not a
person in that large house full of
Î left the a " d
home as sad as one could be to
thmk that people Who pretend to
be not only civilized but Christians
could thmk of ^ng such a stand,
And vlHat waa the stand that they
kad tekeTl ^
J. P. Morgan and company, Wall
Street, held the mortgages on the
farm homes of those poor farmers
of Indiana and the farmers were
asking for help + o keep the titles
those farm homes. Those peo
1 pi®. In refusing to help as re
[cred, J. P. Morgan and company;
people raised his voice in behalf
of our poor farmer neighbors in a
sister s'ate, excepting me.
I told them that I had tried to
do my full duty in the matter and
wl 5 fl " r ' h ? y ' i ' d , their sh ? re wa f
entirely 'heir affair, not mine, and
Proceed J. P. Morgan
quested, said to Wall Street. "Pro
(Continued on page 4)

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