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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, September 27, 1934, Image 3

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Support the Communist Party-Its Candidates
^nd Producers News Chas. E . Taylor Urges
Grand Island, Nebraska
Sept. 12, 1934.
Tn all the Farmers and Workers,
1 n the Members and Sympathizers of the
• t Party U. S. A., and of District No. 11, Gen
nl 'llv and of Plentywood Section of District
So, Ù, Specifically,
Commu
To
I
1
Besides the f actional bickering that has been preva
lent there which has been definitely anti-Party in charac
ter contrary to the Party line and even counter-revoiu- |
lionary, there has appeared and been distributed among
llie workers and farmers of the northwest, especially in ,
North Dakota and Montana, and in the Plentywood sec
monthly paper, named the "Militant Farmer",
Qoinrades :
For many months now there has been controversy,
Te and factionalism in the Plentywood section of
IL tiict No- H» Communist Party U. S. A. The situa
. - n ike plentywood section is deplorable. The re
tl0 .|. oi |i ie personal and factional fights there radiate
6 |ke entire district to the great and lasting injury to
thé cause. v |
Because of my relationship with the Party and my
! az and intimate association with the comrades of the
Plentywood section and District No. 11, and because of
nch position, and influence and prestige as I may have
ainuitg the masses there by reason of many years of
struggle we have gone thru together, 1 am constrained to
nuike°a frank and sincere statement of my position in
reference thereto.

tion. a
promoted by Rodney Salisbury and edited by P. J.
Wallace. 1 have seen two issues of this paper, the first
published June 15, and the second July 15, both issues
came into my hands about August first, last. I want to
state that I have had nothing to do with this paper in
any way, shape, or form. I did not know that Rodney
Salisbury had the founding and publication of a paper
in mind. When the idea was first proposed to me, I ad
vised against it as a matter of principle. I have had
nothing to do with the "Militant Farmers." I did not
approve of the paper, do not now and never have.
The line of the "Militant Farmer" is entirely wrong:
it is not even a revolutionary line. It has a weak re
• formist line with no justification for existence what ever.
Its line is the same as "Labor", and the National Holi
day Leader, as the North Dakota Non Partisan Leader
and the Montana Progressive and many other similar
publications, and it serves no good purpose at all. The
paper would not be even worth mentioning or discussing
by any Communist or sympathizer, but for the fact that
it is exceptionally confusing and misleading to the work
ers and injurious to their cause coming from the source
which it does, namely, from Rodney Salisbury who has
been for so many years actively identified with the
radical and Communist movement and who has taken
such leading parts in the political activities and the
struggles of the workers and farmers in that section and
district, and who has been so widely known as a leader
in the revolutionary cause. By reason oiji this' he has
much influence with the working class of the northwest
which makes anything wrong and misleading that he
may say or do or has said and done, just that much more
reprehensible and injurious.
IE PROPOSES
{Continued firom page 1)
On September 1 and 2.
"At the meeting of our represen
tatives v,e shall be able to discuss
in dftail the ac ions which should
i* undertaken in order to meet the
immediate needs of the farmers.
As a basis for discussion we pt.o
pose such actions as the following:
• Î. That local mass meetings,
COUnty demonstrations and state
marches be organized immediately
under the joint auspices of the
I Holiday Association and United
Farmers 1 eague and whatsoever
I other farmers organizations ar»
I ready to join in such action. Thru
■ snrh action foe farmers will be
able to formulate their owti de
■ mand? ha?en or thorough discus
sifm and consultation.
■ t. A general conference might Oö
TEXTILE STRIKERS HERDED INTO CONCENTRA i ION CAMP
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Scorn 01 textile strikers, including 2« women- ere being h.rded int„ trunks "
-tient camp. Gov. Talmadge has put all of Georgia under martial law in a desperate effort to
^ the strike. Some 4,000 troopers are being used m Georgia.
htern
Support Your Paper By Patronizing Businessmen Who Advertise in The Producers News !
1
called under the joint auspices of
the Holiday Assn, and the United
Farmers League and any other co
operating organization to estab
lish regional or national action.
Such a conference might be a
dtrouth relief conference covering
at least the 21 states now in the
drouth area. Possible action plan
ned by such a conference might be
the sending of a mass delega ion
of farmers to Washington, when
Congress opens or the calling of a
national farm strike.
"We are aware that there are
questions on "which the Nat'oral
i Holiday Association and the United
' Farmers League are no* in aeree
1 ment. This should not however
; prevent us from organizing joint
[ aotivitv on the issues which
have suggested which are of im
; mediate concern to all distressed
i farmer«
^rfo.
we
"We hone to receive your imme>
In Letter to Sheridan County Farmers He Exposes the
Militant Farmer", Asks That Anti-Party Activities
Cease, Urges Loyalty to the Only Revolutionary
Working Class Party, the C. P.
ii
Paper Is Betrayal
with Rodney Salisbury's
The "Militant Farmer
name at the masthead, actively and openly supports the
theory that there is a difference between capitalist poli
ticians or groups of such politicians, and that by sup
porting a choice of such men, obligated to the capitalist
class, and campaigning on capitalist slogans, the imme
diate and ultimate interests of the workers can be pro
moted. If the paper does not say this in plain words, it
did say so by implication and by its direct and indirect
support of such candidates. I especially call attention to
the headline in the June 15th issue, "Let Langer Linger
.Longer," which implies that Langer is such a man that
the workers would be justified in supporting. This is
false and an actual betrayal of the working class of
North Dakota. Such implications deceive and mislead
the workers, destroy their organization and deliver them
unarmed into the hands of the enemies, into the hands
of the fascists. Such a theory teaches the workers falsely
that there is a way out of their misery other than the
struggle way out, the revolutionary way out under the
ieadersnip or the Communist Par y.
Comrades, the Communist Party of the U. S. A.,
Section of the Communist International, under the lead
ership of the Central Committee, is our Party. Its po
litical line is our line. Not because the Central Commit
tee or anybody else says so, but because in the struggles
of the workers and farmers our line has been proven to
be the correct line. So those who fight that line, openly
or secretely, directly or indirectly, aid and abet the ene
| mies of the working class by just so much as they oppose
the Party, only splits and weakens the revolutionary
the line and are by just that much counter-revolutionary.
To try to build another Communist Party along side of
1 the party only splits and weakens the revolutionary
party in the face of its enemie.s Such an act consti
tutes an actual betrayal in spite of any and all excuses,
i This has happened in the Plentywood section. Comrades,
this plan must be abandoned and repudiated by every
honest and sincere Communist.
|
I
|
Duties of Communists
Again, Comrades, there is only one place for a revo
lutionist, and that is the Communist Party. There is
only one place for a Communist to settle Party disputes
and controversies and that is within the constituted
councils of the Party. It is the basic duty of any and
all comrades, prominent or humble, to accept the de
cisions and the discipline of the duly constituted commit
tees of the Party, and in this case the decisions of the
Plentywood Section Committee, and the District Com
mittee of District 11, and to carry them out without
reservation, whole heartedly and sincerely. In case a de
cision of the committees be wrong, it is the duty of a
j conscientious Communist and Party member to appeal
such a decision to a higher committee so that they can
be corrected. In the Plentywood Section, comrades have
tried to settle controversies outside of the Party coun
cils, incorrectly, pursuing the most inexcusable oppor
tunistic paths that have lead to where we now find our
selves.
Fraternally yours,
"Alfred Tiala, Pres.,
Henry Puro. Sec.
!
!
Only a combined struggle, in- j
eluding the majority of the small !
and impoverished middle farmers
of the country, will be able to de- j
feat the oppressive drive of the
Roosevelt government against the j
foiling farmers," stated Henry
Puro in announcing that the letter i
had been sent. "We have proposed
a united front with the farmers in
the Holiday Association in an. ef
fort to unify the ranks of foe toil
insr farme^c and make this victory
possible," he said.
"fo many counties, farmers of
the U.F.L. and farmer? of the
and for higher ntices for their
products. Wherever this has been
done, a victory for foe farmers
99
it
Unity Is Vita!
ii
Holiday have struggled side by side
pvi^tinn? artd foreclosures.
-fr ocprntlv
In Farmers' Interest
"We are anxious to extend this
united front on a national scale,
because we know that this would
be in the interest of the majority of
the smaller farmers,
the Holiday accepts or rejects our
proposal, we should continue our
efforts to build this united front,
Every sfote organization of the
United Farmers League should ap
proach the state organizations of
the Holiday with the proposal of a
! united struggle in the interests of
the small and impoverished middle
: farmers,
j darity between U.F.L. farmers and
Holiday farmers, and work to
gether with them for relief against
foreclosures and evictions, and for
the defeat of foe AAA program,
he concluded,
-
Whether the national board of
. -
County organizations
1 should con tinue to cement the soli
19
Local Brevities
Ludwig Hareland of Hanneford,
N. D., is visiting his daughters in
the city this week. Mt. Hareland
left here some years ago and is
now making cement well curbings
in North Dakota.
Carl and Thorvald Christensen of
the Dagmar country were visiting j
with the L. S. Smith family here
Tuesday.
Dorothy Strubeck started school
again Wednesday after being op
erated on at the Memorial hospital
for appendicitis.
Teachers Institute Wednesday
and Thursday was attended by in
structors from all over the county.
On Wednesday Miss Mattison dis
cussed serving hot lunches to aid
in adding energy to the pupils.
Marriage licenses were issued by
the Clerk of Court to the follow
ing people the past week: Walter
W. Rohweder and Helen E. Jensen
of Westby; Alfred Peterson of Re
serve and Hazel Sunstegaard of
Grenora; Howard Wheeler and
Maxine Hanson, Grenora; Gordon
Gerg of Sidney, Bessie Stephens
of Dore, Mont.
Andy Jensen and Victor VanHee
returned from the western part of
the state "with a truckload of
apples Tuesday.
Bob Farris, Jr., returned to the
CCC camp at Ashland, Mont., Sun
day after spending a week with
his parents here.
Dr. and Mrs. E. E. Yogk are
back again after spending several
weeks vacation in the east.
Comrades, I call upon all of you to cease all anti
Party activities ; to return to the Party, submitting your
selves to such discipline as may be by the Plentywood
Section Committee, and the District Committee of Dis
trict No. 11; to support the Sheridan county Commu
nist Party candidates, earnestly and sincerely ; to get be
hind and support the Producers News, the Party organ
of Sheridan county; and to disassociate yourself from
any and all questionable associations completely, and to
conduct yourselves henceforth as honest and sincere
Bolsheviks should and must.
Comrades, no person or group of persons, is
greater than the Party. And the cause of no indi
vidual is greater than the cause of the masses, and
the great cause of the revolution itself. A com
rade who takes a contrary position is no longer a
leader of the working class, regardless of who he is
or the role he has played in the past.
As revolution approaches, counter-revolution rears
its ugly head. The farmers and workers are in struggle
everywhere. They are attacked by fascist gangs orga
nized by the police, tortured, kidnapped, murdered, jailed
and prosecuted on framed-up charges. Millions of farm
families and unemployed workers face actual starvation.
The responsibility on every Communist was never so
great as now. A good Bolshevik must measure up to
this responsibility. The situation demands revolutionary
unity. No personal consideration can honestly stand be
fore the need of this unity.
Comrades, as for myself, there is only one choice
I can make consistant with my life-long adherence to the
revolutionary cause, and my past teachings and work,
and that choice must be to support the line and leader
ship of the Party, as a member if possible, but at any
event the line and leadership of the Party, which I now
and always have done, and will continue to do, and pain
ful as it may be to me personally, I must disassociate
myself from old comrades who take any other course,
whether they be life long friends or not.
An issue has been made of me and party decisions
involving me. Comrades I accept all these decisions with
out any reservation, and by that token, I call upon all
those who have made these decisions an issue, to accept
them absolutely and without further discussion. I call
upon these comrades as associates of years and veterans
in the cause of the workers—a cause to which no devo
tion has been greater, no sacrifice too exacting, wherein
we have fought so long as comrades, to fall in line again,
as good Bolsheviks should, to face and fight the com
mon enemy of the working class, the capitalist class,
willing and ready to perform the tasks that the workers
of the Plentywood Section, of the district and the world
expect us to perform.
Comrades, back into the ranks of the Communist
Party, where you belong. Back behind the Plenty
wood Section and District Committees. Back be
hind the Communist candidates in the Sheridan
county election campaign.
ducers News, the Plentywood organ of the work
ing class. Let your deeds be the token of your
loyalty and devotion to the cause of the working
class, to the revolution, and to the only Party of the
working class in the struggles of the revolution, the
Communist Party.
Back behind the Pro
Comradely,
CHARLES E. TAYLOR.
Try a Classified Ad
Made to Measure
Two Piece Suit
— or —
Topcoat
$ 20.50
«
Full Suit or Overcoat
$23.50—Pants $7.75
1
The New
Store
I
Trade-in Tire Sale
Pharis Roadgripper Tires
. .$4.39
. 4.89
. 5.49
. 1.00
Exch. 7.43
29x4:40 4-ply ..
30x4:75 4 ply.
28x4:73 4-ply .
Tubes to fit the above .
Giant Size Hot Water Heater
Ace Shotgun Shells, 12 ga.
Alcohol, per gal.
7-Tube Battery Ratio, Super Het, complete 37.50
Stove Pipe, 28 ga., length.
1.10
. 60c
. 20c
Gamble Store Agency
Bob Grasham, Owner
Plentywood
Medicine Lake
Keep in Touch
When You're Away
I
on THE . . .
A*nr A T TUFUkl
I NtrK I M&RN
TELEPHONE
. «■ 1
pen mile
. . . or less
GOOD EVERY DAY
EVERYWHERE
»
I
i
Lr
^T*Tc,
° if
J
A-Saveway-Store
o i »
SPECIALS
Beginning Saturday, Sept. 29
10c
Tomatoes, No. 2 cans .
Macaroni or Spaghetti, 2Tb. pkg. .
Pork and Beans, 3 cans for .
Great Northern Beans, 3 tbs. for .
Blue Rose rice, 3 tbs. for..
Corn, No. 2 can......
Dill Pickles, qt. jars .
Dried Peaches, Extra Fancy, 2 lbs.
Miller's Corn Flakes, 2 pkgs.
Pancake Flour, V/iXh. pkg.
Vanco Vanilla, 8-oz. bottle .
3c Candy Bars, 3 for..
19c
17c
17c
19c
10c
18c
25c
19c
.23c
23c
10c
Farmers Co-op. Âssn.
A Cooperative Store
MONTANA
DAGMAR
FREE!
Remington Portable
Typewriter
OFFER NO 1
TYPEWRITER FREE FOR 20 NEW
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
A handsome, sturdy, dependable machine that rivals
the work of typewriters twice its price. Regularly
sells for |33.50.„ You get it free on our special offer
for just 20 new annual subscriptions.
OFFER NO. 2
TYPEWRITER FREE FOR 28 NEW
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
A machine every member of the family would use and
be proud of. For twelve years a world's best seller—
that's the record of this regulation Remington Port
able. Retails at $45—is built to give a lifetime of
service with a minimum of upkeep expense. Twenty
eight new annual subscriptions takes it home abso
lutely free!
Free Typewriting Course With
Each Machine
We have made arrangements with the Remington Com
pany for these machines. All you need to do is get the
specified number of subscriptions paid in advance.
I When you turn them in at this office you will get your
I new Remington Portable without a cent of cost to you.
i No Chance Contest—You Know Just
What You WiU Get
The Producers News

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