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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, October 04, 1934, Image 4

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ANNOUNCES PLAN FOR ORGAN
IZATION OF U. S. AIR FORCES
WASHINGTON, Oct. 2.—The war de
partment today announced that the organ
ization of the air forces for the general
headquarters has been completed. Forty
eight combat aerial squadrons are station
ed at flying fields in California, Texas. \ ir
ginia. Louisiana, Michigan and Illinois.
Headquarters of the air forces will be at
Langley field. Virginia.
RELIEF GRANTED TO
STARVING RAILROADS
WASHINGTON, Oct. 2.—Millions and
of dollars have been fed to the rail
Now
millions
roads out o , the federal treasm y .
n the Interstate Commerce Commission
have been
it further "loai
announced 1
approved. The Reconstruction Finance Cor
poration will pay to the New \ ork. New
Haven and Hartford railroad $ô,0u0,000 and
to the Chicago
$7,357,000.
these companies were
for two years more.
and Northwestern railway
The loans already owed by
gracefully extended
GENERAL URGES BUILDING OF
HUGE AIR FLEET FOR ATTACKS
WASHINGTON, Oct. 2.—Not only Jap
anese but also high American officers urge
war preparations and talk of attacks.
Speaking to the federal aviation commission
today, Brig. Gen. W. E. Mitchell urged the
building of a powerful war fleet of 40
dirigibles "to attack Japan." He speaks
of Japan as "our most dangerous enemy"
and that with these dirigibles it can be
wiped out within two days. It appears,
however, that these preparations "against
Japan" are just a camouflage and that the
real war is being directed against the Soviet
Union. Similar preparations as are taking
place in the U. S. and Japan can be wit
nessed in Italy, Germany and every other
capitalist country.
60 WORKERS' CLUBS JOIN
FIGHT FOR HR 7598
CHICAGO.—Sixty workers' organiza
tions have formed a united front here to
support the Workers' Unemployment and
Social Insurance Bill, HR 7598. Most of
the groups are neighborhood clubs and for
eign language groups, who plan on adding
their support to that of the unemployed
and the trade union roups in Chicago al
ready mobilized behind HR 7598.
FIGHT MASS EVICTIONS
IN PITTSBURGH
PITTSBURGH.—With 1,200 evictions
scheduled by the landlords within the week
as a result of the refusal of slum property
owners to accept the partial rent payment
adopted recently by relief authorities. The
Unemployed Councils are mobilizing Pitts
burgh jobless for a fight against these
evictions under the slogan, "Nobody shall
sleep outdoors,
of the Singleton family, was won when the
relief authorities were forced to find a new
home for the Singletons before nightfall on
the day that they were evicted.
Already a test case, thaï
EARNINGS OF SUGAR BEET WORK
ERS DROPPED 75 PER CENT
A survey by the Department of Labor
published in the Monthly Labor Review of
July, 1934, shows that the average family
of sugar beet contract workers in 1933
earned $312 against $1,011 in 1924. It was
estimated that $600 was needed to support
a family on the very lowest subsistence le\
el Pay even at this starvation rate, would
be at least $2150 to S 24.50 ,>er a c re m
stead of the 1933 average of $13.87. Cali
below average, being
fornia pay was
per acre/
The above figures apply to whole fami
lies with children working in the fields
beside their parents. Of 110,354 workers,
14J43 were children under 16. The work
period lasts from the middle of April to
the first of November, with the work day
listing from 10 to 14 hours in busy sea
sons.
THUGS DEPORT
FARM WORKERS
SALINAS, Cal.—Because they would
to arbitration and to end the
not agree
strike, 1,000 Fhilipino lettuce pickers have
been deported from the Salinas valley by
armed vigilantes. Even those who had ac
cepted the terms and were at work in the
fields were included in the drive. Guns
and clubs were used to enforce the vigil
antes' demands, though there was no re
sistence.
I
SOCIALIST LEADERS KEEP DELE
GATES FROM ANTI-WAR CONGRESS
BALTIMORE, Sept. 30.—Leaders in the
city central committee of the Socialist par
ty here prevented Edward Richardson, duly
elected delegate of the east end branch
from attending the Second United States
Congress Against War and Fascism in Chi
cago which ended last night.
Half an hour before tram time on Sat
urday night, representatives of the Socialist
city central committee came to the railroad
station and persuaded Richardson to remain
home.
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Vote Communist Nov. 6th
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A Protest Against Existing Conditions of Misery:
A Blow Against the Present System of Hunger and SLi
For a World In Which Those Who Work Receive the Full Benefit cl Th
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heir !
For County Commissioners
(Vote for Two)
For State Senator
For State Representatives
(Vote for Two)
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Hans Hardersen
Farmer of Archer
August Westnh?!
Farmer of Outlook
Oden Lutness
Fanner of McElroy
Melvin Evenson
Farmer of Raymond
Gonius Laursen
Farmer of Dagmar
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The Communist Party of Sheridan County
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INTRODUCES ITS CANDIDATES AND APPEALS TO FARMERS AND
WORKERS, TO THE SMALL BUSINESSMEN AND PROFESSIONALS TOi
VOTE FOR THESE CANDIDATES AND SUPPORT THIS PROGRAM
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Program
1. Against Roosevelt's "New Deal
attacks on the living standards of the
toilers, against rising living costs re
sulting from monopoly and inflation;
for higher wages, shorter hours, a
shorter work week, and improved liv
ing standards.
2. Against capitalist terror and the
growing trend toward fascism; against
deportations and oppression of the for
eign born ; against compulsory arbitra
j tion and company unions; against the
use of troops in strikes; for the work
ers' right to join unions of their own
; choice, to strike, to picket, to demon
strate without restrictions ; for the
maintenance of all the civil and political
rights of the masses.
3. For unemployment and social in
surance at the expense of the employ
ers and the state; for the Workers'
j Unemployment Insurance Bill (H. R.
i 7598).
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For County Treasurer
Selmer Espeland
Farmer of McElroy
4. For the repeal of the Agricultur
al Adjustment Act; emergency relief
by the government or banks; exemp
stricken farmers without restrictions
by the govrenment or banks; exemp
tion of impoverished farmers from
taxation; cancellation of the debts of
poor fanners; for the Farmers' Emer
gency Relief Bill.
5. Against Jim-Crowism and lynch
ing; for equal rights for the Negroes
and self-determination for the Black
Belt; for the Negro Bill of Rights.
6. For the immediate payment of
the veterans' back wages (bonus).
7. Against the sales tax; no taxes
on persons or their property, earning
less than $3,000 per year; steeply
graduated and greatly increased taxa
tion on the rich.
8. Against Roosevelt's war prepar
edness program ; against imperialist
j war, for the defense of the Soviet
Union and Soviet China.
In the State Senate and as State Repre
isentatives the candidates of the Commun
ist Party will work
For Unemployment Insurance and Old
Age Pensions;
For Cash Relief and its unrestricted dis
tribution ;
For State and Federal appropriations
for schools, against discrimination of farm
ers' and workers' children at high schools
and colleges.
As County Officers Communist candi
dates will fight
Against evictions and foreclosures of
impoverished farmers and workers;
Against terroristic attacks by state
troops, sheriffs forces and bands of vigil
antes; against the growing trend toward
fascism
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For County Surveyor
Hans Rasmussen
Bricklayer of Plentywood
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FIGHT FOR ITS DEMANDS!
SUPPORT THE COMMUNIST PLATFORM
VOTE FOR ALL THE COMMUNIST CANDIDATES!
JOIN THE RANKS OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY!
For Co. Supt. of Schools
Elna Swanson
Teacher of Plentywood
For County Assessor
Otto Grantham
Farmer of Raymond
WESTBY
Mr. and Mrs. B. Larson of Cros
by were visitors with friends here
Sunday.
Mrs. Carl Johnson is enjoying
a visit with her father who came
last week from Minneso a.
Mrs. E. E. Morrison and Delila,
Mrs. R. Strubb© and son Gordon
were callers in Crosby Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. John Rohweder
left for Glasgow and Fort Peck
by tram Thursday.
R. Stubbe left for Grand Forks
Satu roay.
Mrs. Pete Bredrine, Mr. and
Mrs. August Hultgren and Mrs.
Enger attended the meeting at Al
kabo given by Miss Stroms: ed, mis
sionary, Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Hess, Miss Tre
sa Anderson were in Crosby Fri
day.
Among those in Plentywood
Monday were Mr. and Mrs. C. J.
Johnson, Ernest Stephen, Mrs. E.
Bunt, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hess Mrs.
R. Stubbe, Mias Mabel Anderson
and Adolph Anderson,
Mrs. L. Jorgensen, president of
the Lutheran Free Ladies' Aid
sponsored a farewell party for
Mrs. Sivert Bartness, one of their
active members, at the home of
Mrs, Henry Rohweder of McElroy.
o*
The evening was spent in a social I
way and at a late hour a luncheon
was served by members of the aid.
A few words were spoken in be
half of the aid members for their
departing friend nd Vorher who is
to Mrs - Bartness and best wishes
go with her and family in their
leaving for Idaho to make her fu
ture home. A gift was presented
new home.
The H. D. club had a good day
Saturday. The sale and supper
brought a good sum. The proceeds
will go for the expenses of the
park work.
For employment of local labor on road
work and projects;
For medical and dental care of needy; |
For nine months term of school and ;
transportation of children ; for milk and hot :
lunches at school;
For non-payment of interest or princi
pal of bonds* as long as needs of farmers
and workers are not taken care of.
<
At all times and everywhere the Com-1
munist Party, its candidate« and members
will fight and work for the best interest
of impoverished farmers and workers and ,
against the aims and interests of the cap- !
italist class that is suppressing and exploit- _
ing the laboring people.
For Sheriff
Chris Heiberg
Farmer of Dagmar
For five years the nation has been in
The Re
the throes of a terrible crisis,
publican party of Hoover and now the Dem
ocratic party of Roosevelt have both failed
to relieve the suffering of the people or to
overcome the crisis. Their policies have
served only to further enrich the biggest,
the monopoly capitalist and to further im
poverish the great masses of the people.
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Roosevelt's A.A.A., embodying the will
ful destruction of hundreds of millions of
dollars worth of cotton, wheat, cattle, etc.,
while millions go hungry, has resulted in
more evictions of farmers from their land,
in more foreclosures and in the further im
poverishment of the mass of small and
middle faimers. The A. A.A. destruction,
combined with the drought, has brought the
whole farming section from Canada to
Mexico to the condition of famine.
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Again on Nov. 6 the farmers and work
ers of the United States are offered the
opportunity to show by the ballots whether
they are still willing to continue to live
under these conditions caused by the poli
cies of the Roosevelt and Hoover parties.
The capitalist newspapers all over the
country, together with the politicians in
every county, are offering the finest and
most wonderful promises to induce workers
and farmers to vote Democrat or Republi
can.
For Clerk and Recorder
Magnus Danielsen
Faimer of Medicine Lake
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The Communist party points out that j
all these promises are empty. Past expert- j
ence has shown that neither Democrats nor
Republicans have any intention to keep a i
single one of their promises. They will be ,
broken and forgotten the morning after |
election.
Only by a vote that registers an ener
getic protest against Wall Street's execu
tive committee headed by Roosevelt only
by a vote that registers another fighter
against the most insane and inhuman con
ditions, only by a vote for the Communist
party, the party of the workers and farm
ers, can we hope to bring about a change
that will do away with hunger and misery,
oppression and
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LONGVIEW
_
Mrs Math Havland and sons |
Morris and Leonard and Mrs. Ed
Ameson weire to the Ladies' Aid
at the home of Mrs. Ed .
Spoklie Thursday, Sept. 20.
There will be a Ladies' Aid
meeting at the home of Mrs. Fred
Brentensen October 4. ;
Mr. and Mrs. Gust Westrup and
daughter Mildred, Mr. Klat and
Mr- and Mrs. Fred Miller visited
at the Nels Ameson home a week
ago Sunday.
Melvin An,.™ . ,,
^ WH«, hom. wXL,
A»*« OWi, Nels Amesi sad
Fred Miller were Comertown call
ers last Tuesday.
Andres Olson, William and Paul
lUer called at the N. A. Ameson
last Wednesday,
"*• Mrs. Fred Miller and
family and Mevlin Amesno called
^ ust Westrup home Wed
^ ay meht
/red Herman visited a while
FViday *
TÎir™ 1 , er entertained the
J? 1 family - Alfred
S ^ ldren f> d "«• Ed Ar
and ««* Amt and Melvin
at a whis t party Pridav night. The
18,h
Mel ™ Arae " n
won
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JAP ARMY COMMANDERS rprp
WAR WITH SOVIET UNION E
TOKIO, Oct. 2. A vigorous manif
urging preparations for war with th ç 1
Union, was issued todav in namnhilT^ m
by the Japanese army commander a forTn I
other things the pamphlet pointed / , n * I
superiority of the American airfl^ I
is three to one as compared to the 2.7* I
of the Japanese empire. Immedht« force
publication of the pamphlet, share ' Up0!1
Tokio stock exchange dropped about the
cents apiece. lD °ut
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The spokesman of the war •
stated that "the pamphlet
views of the Japanese army" P T u K th *
festo boasts that the strength of a ma ^
will "make futile the threfts of n ean "t
Stimson," ferner U. S. septan
c . P*eP^ m pl'let appears shortly after -1 ■
•Soviet Union has consented to sell t lke ■
her rights on the Chinese East* Ä
lor a miserable price in order to avoid?,
possible cause fo war. In snip, of im ?"
which showed that the üïs R 1 '*»
seriously concerned with keeping the "**
of the world, the Japanese imperialists
now actively engaging in definite pr L
tions for war against the Soviet Union
PtdCfe
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DUTCH QUEEN IS
HISSED OFF ROSTRUM
THE HAGUE, Sept. 21.—Queen WilheL
mina was hissed off the rostrum todav
when she appeared to open the new ses
sion of the Dutch parliament. The demon
stration came partly because of the action
cf the Dutch ministers to the League of
Nations in voting against the entrance of
the U.S.S.R. to the league, and partly be
cause of mass indignation over shooting of
working class demonstrators in the streets
of Amsterdam last month.
BULGARIA DEPORTS
WORKERS' DEFENDER
PARIS, Sept. 20.—Attorney Hajje. a
member of the Paris bar and the Interna
tional Judicial Association, was deported
j from Bulgaria after 24 hours of detention,
; his papers and money confiscated, without
I being permitted to defend the 123 soldiers
j and workers arrested as a result of the
' August 1 anti-war demonstration.
! SPANISH
i CABINET FALLS
; MADRID, Oct. 1.—As the Spanish par
1 Lament opened today, one cabinet member
after another announced his resignation.
Premier Ricardo Samper hurriedly visited
President Zamora where he presented the
resignation of the entire cabinet, including
himself.
EXPOSE REVEALS STARVATION f
LEVEL OF GERMAN PEOPLE
COLOGNE.—For the first time since H
the advent of the Hitler regime, big busi-l
ness in the provinces of Rhineland arid I
Westphalia has mustered sufficient courage I
to testify to the dire results of the Nazi H
rule on the German people. A seem ex- 1
pose written by the united chambers of in-1
dustry and commerce in Rhineland-West-1
phalia and forwarded to the government. I
severely criticizes official regulations of I
food supplies and the continuous rise ini
food prices. According to a special price I
tabulation appended to the report, prical
of staple foods rose from early 1933 to I
early 1934 as follows: Butter 36 per cent.I
lard 58 per cent, lowest priced margarine I
(artificial butter) 182 per cent, food oils!
138 per cent, bacon 26 per cent, eggs 391
per cent, canned vegetables 18 to 29 perl
cent, cheese 38 per cent, sausage 33 perl
cent, and fish 50 per cent. i
A copy of the expose was shown to the I
TIS correspondent who noted the following ■
characteristic parts: "Price increases have I
become so pronounced that they must in-1
evitably lead to a dearth. No other country I
competing with German industry sho'vsl
such high food prices as Germany. TheB
income of 80 to 90 per cent of the workinfl
populace of the Ruhr district does not w*l
ceed the bare income existence minimum. I
The expose concludes with the ominous!
remark: "The government must realize the■
enormous discontent and political disihu-B
sionment created by these conditions among ■
the people and especially among the wort-B
ers who formerly belonged to the Marxist |
party.
WAR MUST
BE LOVED"
HARBIN.—FSU)— An article en
War Must Be Loved" which app# 11 ^
the Japanese paper "Harbin Sinibun
characteristic of the unscrupulous war *r I
itation which is at present being earned p I
by the Japanese press, particularly inI
churia. This particular article says: •
tenths of our compatriots (i. e., the VI
anese in Manchuria) are of the op
ii
iH
ion that it will be a good thing when ^ I
does come. The desire once and f° r ^
destroy the Soviet Union and t ^ 1 ® reDy sl *|
cure peaceful conditions must be gi veI1 1
port. This desire must be felt all ° ve ^ i
country which must be roused into .
against the beasts, for it is not enougn
only the Japanese in Harbin recogni
necessity.
The paper calls upon all na| ^
to support the preparations for ".
makes the following recomn 1 ^''^^
Even the school children must eco ^
__ their school needs and breakta* > _ j
the 3-year-olda must be ma ^ e /îfW
to carrying arms and be taught ,
is fine, that indeed, war roust be
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