OCR Interpretation


The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, May 24, 1935, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1935-05-24/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE FOUR

FRïDAY may
THE PRODUCERS NEWS
24, l% u
Will Farmers Let Themselves Be Tied Down for Four Years?
The present AAA program concludes with this
year's crop. The AAA officials contemplate another
period of its destruction and reduction policy.
The next period of the AAA program calls for four
year contracts.
The AAA administrators say that the reason for
extending the time is to cut down expenses—a very
innocent excuse. The real reason is obviously to have
us farmers kept under their control for four years at
a spell.
bushels W * lea *' excee ds the export by many million
Farm Research, Inc., has just released some
mo] 8 i S lowing some very interesting figures on the
1934 wheat crop:
The farmers were forced to reduce their wheat
acreage in 1934 by 15 per cent or more, a total reduc
tl0n Si about 18,000,000 acres.
From July 1, 1934, to January 31, 1935, imports of
wheat exceeded exports by 16,000,000 bushels.
. , l°tal exports ot wheat and flour during this pe
nod was 14,830,000 bushels compared with 18,605,000
bushels for the
20 per cent.
feat this deceitful policy.
A program that will have any possibility
ing us out of this crisis must take up the
the distribution and buying power of the
the people have buying power they
raise and more.
Instead of decreasing workers' wages as tho p
velt NR A and AAA does, wages must be increased u ^
is where the struggle demands our combined
This is what the AAA should work on instead of its '
But here is where the shoe pinches TW ;
actly what the AAA officials will not do beoaiL^I
would mean that the Wall Street gang would h-iv f*
share their huge profits with the workers through vJ?
ter wages. ~ " L '
One step in forcing them to do it is by defeatin
the wheat contract program on Saturday, May 25 ?
farm products out of the reach of many workers. Their
inability to buy farmers' products has male itself acute
ly felt.
°f bring,
questkm of
masses. Wh en
can use all We
Already meat consumption has decreased 30 per
cent since the AAA program started; milk and other
dairy products some 20 per cent; cotton consumption
over 30 per cent, etc.
Farmers and workers are so closely interrelated
that if the one part suffers the other must suffer too.
They must have the farmers' products and we in turn
must have their manufactured goods in order to live.
Now if the farmers' goods are out of reach of the
consumers, who is going to buy it? It will still accumu
late, no matter how much the AAA reduces the acreage.
The AAA program cannot remedy these conditions
by reduction and destruction methods. The quicker we '
can get away from it and put our efforts to work where
it really would help, the better we will be off. Vote
against the AAA program on Saturday, May 25. Dé
cati
It seems like many farmers have let themselves be
deceived by the much talked of "overproduction.
If it was actually true that there was a surplus of
goods, there would be some justification to cut down on
production. But the opposite is so plain in the mere
fact that millions of people are hungry and suffering
from malnutrition and go clad in rags.
We must even import goods from other countries.
Even with our high tariffs on foreign wheat, the im
r*
re
duction craze.
same period of 1933-34, a decrease of
HOW DO THE WORKERS FARE?
Another phase of the AAA program is its rela
tionship to the workers, the great mass of consumers
of farm products.
The AAA program has virtually put many of the
1
I
U
RM 1
THE
■#.
■ '
t lv
\
J
f
■r4
* ' T
> :vV
i.f:
■vl.
% ■-,
Hu»
NAZIS TERROR
IN GERMANY
Electric Torture Used
WUPPERTAL.—Four anti-fascist men,
Willi Muth, Fritz Kreikenbaum, Hans Kra
mer and an oppositional Storm Trooper
were slaughtered last week by the fas
cists. Their dead bodies showed signs of
strangulation, wounds and holes burned in
their toes.
At Frizi Kreikenbaum's funeral, more •
than 200 persons were arrested and fright
fully maltreated. The salist butchers in
the Wuppertal prison are utilizing electric
ity as their latest invention in torture.
Electric current leaves no visible trace and
causes the most excruciating pain by tear
ing down the electrical resistance of the
body's organs and by ripping apart the tis
sues internally.
*r
FIRST B AI TOON ATR-TRATN'Q
SUCCESSFUL FLIGHT ^ '
MOSCOW.—(FSU)—The first air-train
consisting of three balloons connected by
means of a cable started from the Moscow
balloon station at 5:50 a. m. yesterday for
. Sarpukhov. At 6:30 a. m. the air-train
appeared above Serpukhov. Tt 7:20 two
parachutists jumped from the train and
landel in the village of Sartyakime, Pololsk
Dïstnct.
Two Women Driven Insane
OBERHAUSEN, Ruhr District. — One
hundred and eighteen arrested anti-fascist
men and women, imprisoned after Nazi
raids in early April, are still being cruelly
tortured. No one is allowed to leave the
Mulheim prison alive. Two women named
Hermann and Hassberg have lost their rea
son because of the horrors they have un
dergone.
A workman named Hennes was only a
mass of bleeding flesh after the tortures.
Another, who refused to make a statement
revealing the names of Communist trade
unionists, had the ends of his toes and
fingers mashed to pieces with a hammer.
GERMAN GIRLS URGED
TO MARRY FARMERS
BERLIN, May 13.—Alarmed by the
drop in the birth rate, which threatens to
bring about a decline in the German pop
ulation shortly, Hitler has made an appeal
for 333,000 girls to volunteer themselves
as wives for bachelor farmers. Women un
der 25 are required to work on farms
year before they may accept other employ
ment, with the hope some of them will
marry and relieve the unemployment prob- ,
lern which Germany is facing.
Communist gains in France's recent
municipal elections, especially in the sub- :
urbs of Paris, held the attention this week
Of political commentators.
rriv^ , Ar , .
• • Communists gamed 40 seats on
WbriJftt 1 taking most of them from ;
Socialists, With whom they are now united I
in a common political front. Only seven 1
of the seats gained were in Paris suburbs,
however - 1
!
RAMSAY MACDONALD
WILL RESIGN
aid TK
. ', re 1 1 " j British Laoor par- j
y? . finally dGcilud to resign as prime
minister in favor of the conservative lead
er, Stanley Baldwin. It was said that Mac
Donald's decision was due to ill health.
COMMUNISTS GAIN IN
PARIS MUNICIPAL VOTE
ENGLISH BIRTHS IN
SLUMP SINCE 1920
LONDON, May 17.—In England in 1934
the number of births amounted to 598,084
as against 957,782 in 1920. England occu
pied sixth place in the world in 1920 in
number of births. Today it occupies 18th !
place, as the inability of th î people to sup- I
port children has caused extensive resort
to birth control.
THREE KILLED IN
ITALIAN DEMONSTRATION
ROME, May 17.—The police fired upon
and killed three and wounded 12 persons
in a demonstration in southern Italy.
The farmers were demonstrating ag
ainst the commissioners named by the lo
cal perfect to investigate the activities of
the agricultural cooperatives.
DANES UNDERMINE'
THE PROFIT SYSTEM
BY CO-OPERATIVES
!
j
Only 3 Per Cent of Farms
Are Operated By
Tenants
By WALLACE J. CAMPBELL
(Federated Press)
While American fanners face an
increasir.g blight of tenancy, farm
ers in Denmark have united to
throw off the yoke of absentee
landlordism by cooperative action, i
In 1850 some 42 per cent of the i
farms in Denmark were owned by ;
persons who did not till the soil.
Today only 3 per cent of the farms ;
are operated by tenants In con
?a trrr:
ir 1 !^ tn 1920**67 pe/ctnt L j
1930; and 58.8 per cent in 1933. 1
In the United States as a whole, '
tenancy increased from 25.6 peri
cent in 1880 to 36.6 per cent in !
1900 and 42.4 per cent in 1930
f AU 'he American !
dMduÄDaTes eot'teMthëi
. n , a1 ' got together
to do something for themselves. ,
Agitation for a system of folk
schools began as early as 1832. By
1864 cooperative schools for the
edneation of adults beyond school
ag-e had been established a' ,
70 per cenTnf l Jiït/
mark are' ïolîéi br^ te the »r™
that thev have sunnlemented their
grammar and high school «lining
by attending thdr folk schools in
the Winter when it is impossible
for them to engage in agriculture,
More books and pamphlets are,
published per unit of population
countrTTn^he wwld n The °folk
country in the world. The folk
tional S baS e fo^economic 6 d^moc' !
r£y democ ',
In 1886 Rev. Hans Christian 1
Sonne, a paster in Thisted, r.e„.^
mark, was interrupted in the midst
(of a sermon on Christian virtue by
? laboring man who said: Virtue
doelnotTeTÏne" a pic^of bread
wo e u d n be morefn thf
■ „ in our hne. Thi^,
influenced Sonne to visit England's !
sTnpXfirTsucc^sMc^u^
et, p tne nrst successful consum
ers cooperative in Denmark. Six
fu^marketing^ cooperative waTor"
xui marketing cooperative was or ■,
c"tive tikLf 1nTeZ e a r rl !
ŒTSvJTwld 20 ^ 7 ^;
of the retail trade. Cooperative 1
marketing has had an even great- i
er development: in 1934 the o-!
operatives handled 25.1 per cent of i
the eee- exnort 39 1 ner cent 0 f
to meat Ättle exfort 4?Vr i
cent of the butter export, and 90
per cent of the milk treated by the
dairies.
Consumers' cooperative societies
in Copenhagen operate 94 shops
with a membership of 28,000. Nine
model cooperative apartment hous-,
es were recently erected in urban I
^Uons of Denmark and more than
20,000 cooperative houses have
been built. Membership in con-jited
Sumers' cooperatives includes 42:
per cent of Denmark's households.
Cooperative retail business for
1934 totalled $ 68 , 200 , 000 , an in
crease of 101 *** cent over 1933 -1
A cooperative wholesalesociety
... , . up la J 896 to coordinate
the buying of local cooperatives,
Discrimination and boycotts b y
private interests drove the whole
sale to foreign markets to secure
raw materials and to manufacture
its own commodities. It now man-1
ufactures in its oWn factories for|
cooperative trade a variety of pro-!
ducts ranging from soap, cholocate
and margarine to shoes, bicycles
and ready-made clothes. The sale
volume of the wholesale rose to
$42,000,000 and its manufactured
product to $ 12 , 000,000 in 1934.
? UreaU 1/ tatiS ^T
Ä
« MS
purchase is taking into accourt
the savings effected through co
operative purchasing was 14.4 per
<»«t
was set
In the struggle to make the
Danish fanner economically inde
pendent, cooperative marketing
ha s increased his income, cooper
tive purchasing increased the buy
ing power of that income, and co
operative finance has to a great
extent freed him from exploitation
by outside capital.
Cooperative associations for lonv
term credit were organized in Der -
mark as early as 1850. More than
500 cooperative associations aro in
operation, and 159 cooperative
rural banks have been organized
since 1915. The Danish Cooporn
tive Bank, one of the youngest co
operative enterprises, recorded de
posits of $6.600,000 in 1934 and a
turnover for the year of $1,325,
000 , 000 .
In the battle against landlord
ism, the Dares have built the be
ginning of a system of production
and distribution for use and not
for profit.
(Editor's Note—Germary also
had a vast system of workers' co
operatives. Fascism has complete
ly destroyed them. If all efforts
to build cooperatives shall not be
entirely wasted, the political fight
against fascism has to be won in
order to make future cooperatives
secure.)
.
from P,entywood were U P to
^ vic * nity fmm pientywoo<i iast
W S nc ? ,ay *
Y}® Anke l f d . rove to P entywood
Fnday £ Usin< *f- . . . ^ w
Mrs ' E * Fawcett entertained Mr.
and Mrs ' Henry Witte on the oc '
"fro^tte Out
look Wgh sch ° o1 **■> grar are "
foll . Luci n e Anderson Luclie
Boe Franccs Deck McW; Deck
fr ances i>ecK Melvin jeck,
Mar «aret Fitzgerald, Viola Good
'""n. Esther Grave, Mayme John.
8 °"' G *°f^ Kohler Mabel Larter,
Margaret Lundeen, Eileen Ordahl,
Gle ™ Person Elvin Reed, Mild
Schruhl. Barbara Uelaid and
^^nard Wirtz.
Q TÎ* ' hain lettar h"ai"ess around
°" tIook 18 teaching huge proper
. b . ut .. th ? ordlnary Pe«"" ™
mm,t y 15 not answenng
^ ^ ^
Dr &nd Mrg R f plert d
Max Kri eger and Peter Melle
were gund call t th home
of Mr< and Mrs - Conrad Benson of
Plentywood.
andMr " - 4 - We fP | ' al
dt « 'Z'Tomewhat "Ä
somewhat .mult. y
• Mar-aret Deck now
Mrg Schiebold 0 " f Minn '
came hotne t0 her mother and
to see the graduate from
sc hool. Mrs. Schiebold came
^^"rèday ^llh™r httle smn
Warrm and hcr husbandL™*
^ ^ ^ wee ] c caf
Mr and Mrs M Flannerv drov«
to Scobey and Flaxvi11 * this week
^ ^
"Z' of the Outlook
-tehool entertained tbe second trad-1
< ' ra I wl ' h a c !fu s M »" da y
onday afternoon s warmth nas
b ™'fht all the prospect,ve gard
OUTLOOK
Mrs. Nick Rueter and Mrs. Ad
CTm and , " dscaTC artmts ,n the
community into the open with tne
a " d -hes.
^ ^
Mr. and Mrs. Tom ClaVson are
renting their town house.
Leonard Smith spent Sunday,
with Robert Cook.
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Whitish vis
at the Art Kazeck home last
Sunday.
Rufus Marks left for the dam
a coupla of we eks ago.
j Daisy Thompson is sick with.
stomach flu.
| Miss Doima Kazeck, Donald Gref!
Harold Whitish and Donald Grey
v. _ 3
, took 8th ^ ade exams -
j.. . _
| "J®* Go ™ n ^ re , di »WT guest*
! ™~ us . ^ ar ks Sunday,
, waa a caller at
the 01e Benson home Sunday.
Miss AHc e Whitish called at
J°e Whitish home Wednesday.
Ole Benson took hi s daughter
Signa back to the Berg rarch last
: Sunday.
Mrs. Thyra Marks called on Mrs
Ben Schlag Frida"
I Mrs ' Roy Cook called on her sis
Markä ' Sa '" rta ^
:
ARCHER
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Boelens and
j
!
The Telephone Saves
Mileage
;
1
j
1
'
i 3 ^
Get market information,
order supplies, save
trips to town.
You ' re always in touch —by telephone
PRESIDENT VETOES
PATMAN BONUS BILL
House Quickly Overrides
His Veto By Large
Majority
WASHINGTON, May 22.—The
présider t delivered his veto on the
Patman bonus bill in person today.
Scarcely had he left the house of
of representatives before it over
rode the veto by a vote of 322
to 98.
The senate decided to wait un
til tomorrow to consider the presi
dent's message. It is yet doubt
ful What they will do, but it is
expected that they will sustain the
veto.
favor
PRESIDENTS FAKE
I IVLiJUSLtll I J IfilVL
(CmiDlTV Dili'
otlUKllY DlLL
WUVVIUI *
WASHINGTON, May 17,-The
fil î anCe committee tot * a V
unanimously voted a favorable re
P<« on the administratifs Wag
. . " soc ; a i oecuritv" hill
senate committee nlac
^ ^ !^Hf anmOTa! on fte
whiA^feaves X 16M0M«
Dm wmen leaves tne lö.uuu.uou
^employed completely out in
the cold, Which also eliminates all
transport, agncutural, domestic
" d
™ 8a ™um benefits for the
an j " ban L, Sm'il.r
b m s No unemDlovmSl
frem gorêZenî K ate pÆ
vided.
Under the " social security" bill
funds for unemployment reserves
™ lU lje raised through a p^^ 11
Z .wl"* at , pe , r cent m ! 93
isss. it TsZ Ipcn Zi« thS
tlda ^ S tee
wages ^ the workers and will alg0
P^setl <m to the consumers.
The bill provides for old age
pen3 /° ns , f. a maximum of $30 a
month half to be contributed by
the federal government provided
! the states mat « b *>■« sum.
««»uevelt "aocial security"
i bill is designed to block the great
mass movement that has developed
f e W ° r ^ rs Unemployment,
Old Age and Social Insurance bill
f ^) which has been intro
^hÏÏe
ae<n Ml "" es » ta -
LUTHERAN FREE CHURCH
Wfelb. M™
T Lut"« Uame meet. «,
Q . er ^ague meets at
^ ^ a '
The Y.P.S. of the Oslo congreg
atl on. meets at the home of Mr.;
! a ? d Mrs. S. Eckenes on Friday,
May 31, at 8 p.
m.
NOTICE to taxpayers
Any person having
i in real estate heretofore sold for 1
; taxes to the county, and no as
! signment of such sale having- been
.made, may ideem the ^Lbv
I Paying the original tax without
penalty or interest, if payment is
made on or before Dec 1 1935
PAUL KURTZ*
County Treasurer,
1 Sheridan County.
^ - ,
A S P nnts and beautiful
the'rf'f , 0 01 .. P° int; c<l enlarge
va "iable coupon on
Quick en | ar ? e ^, en ^'
rr , Ce ' j Guaranteed Work
j CliP ^ ^ and mail With film to
JANESVILLE FILM SERVICE
| Janesville, Wisconsin
I Individual attention to each picture
m.
G. Mellby, pastor.
an interest
ï

! Kodak Films Developed
25c
A Woman Subscriber
Writes From Havre
Havre, Montana,
May 15, 1936.
. .
They discriminate here awfully.
SÄJ he wc
a month in * or k but nev* did
it; only 2, 3 and "day" rèonft
If we ask them why, they Just say
they are short of money.
One old lady tried to get a mat
tress. Finally the case worker
threw her out of the room and told
her to stay out. She is a friend
of mine, is 75 years old and has
lived on a ranch here for 42 years,
We can do nothing until the peo
pie wake up.
A Woman Subscriber.
j
1
:
!
j
!
j
Producers News:
This week I happened to get two
of your papers and I will pass
them on to others. If I was able
to I would pay for several copies
and get it spread among the peo
ple. I say hurray for the Pro
ducers News; it is the only true
news we get here.
„ , .
. Gre . at J" 0 "«* P°' so P «g»"
tery m the last few m onths Fn-,
day claimed the life of Montana's
1934 prize baby ' Co ™ ie L»" Ja- i
cobsi "' 20 montbs « ld daugl >t«
M d M AI i j aPO b^ n 41 s
™ r f ^ ana ™ rs e Jean ill
^
of ^ Jacobsen«? and foster dauo-b
I ter of Mr. Jacobsen's mother, Mrel
Jacob Jacobsen of Plent js
in a serious condition at the Dea
COTess '"'PM. Connie Lou died |
at 3 a ' Saturiay.
The gnef-stneken parents are !
^"^ ced ^ at the child was the i
i ™ ctim . of P° is pn set out by the
sib^for 0 ^ manv h ?o^ C deaDi SP ° n
°:teat vWnltv Z'tht ll îvJj;
montJls - Attending physicians ,ie
«' a ^ th. chihi" 'death was
due to accidental poisoning. They
! ^port that the other child, Jean
Lorraine, has a fighting chance to
hv ®|
Mr. Jacobsen is employed as a
druggist. They have lived at Great
: Falls forjhe last year or so. An
other daughter Marda Dell, will
be a month old Sunday.
Connie Lou's grandmother, Mrs.
Jacob Jacobsen of Plentywood, and
httle Jean Lorraine, had just ar-i
! Hjed for a visit at Grei Falls !
1 PPened '
JACOBSEN BABY IS
POISONED AT FAILS'
Use the Producers News wart
ad column.
i
î

V
FARMERS PLAN UNITED ACTION!
Complete Report of the
Farmers Emergency Relief Conference
Held in Sioux Falls, S. D., March 25-27
Including discussions, reports anl resolutions.
Speeches of Lem Harris, Roy Burt, Clarence Hath
away, Dr. N. E. Hansen and Dr. Kurt Rosenfield.
64 PAGE BOOKLET
15 for $1
Order Now from
C. WALSTAD, Dpt. E, Box 366, Sioux Falls, S. D.
♦♦ <■ * »> ■!< ♦ >î< >t< 4« »I» ♦> » 4 4* 4 <■»»»»
i
*
*
10c a copy
100 for $6
Dairy Farmers
Bring Your Cream to
Armour's Cream
Station
LOCATED IN WESTS CREAMERY
MARKET PRICE
RIGHT TEST
Your Check in a Few Minutes
a
Bob" Van Hee
Manager
Plentywood,
Montana
ROOSEVELT SIGNS
(Continued from page 1)
$27, $25, $22 and $19. Intermedi
ate workers will receive $49, $43,
$38, $32 and $27. Skilled workers
will be paid $58, $53. $50, $42 and
$35. Professional and technical
workers will be paid $75, $64, $55,
$46 and $39.
Roosevelt Exposes Himself
Through these tabulations, Mr.
Roosevelt exposes himself for what
he is — a rea i ene my to the Ameri- 1
£ i ] ing mass t K?Tl e Wh0
• boforc ' . a "J?*'
Ï* * now thcy study
His object is cut prevailing
waKe s down to new low pauper
levels, to break labor unions, to
force farmers onto subsistence
plots—in short, to make serfs of
the whole American working class,
All this in order to increase the
huge profits of Wall street. And
yet he stated as one of his main
reasons for vetoing the bonus bill
that he did not believe in "favor
ing one certain class." This from
him, who is working for and fa
voring but one certain class—the
Wall street class.
One Certain Plan
Roosetvelt and his helpers have
been working on one certain plan
—namely to prepare the people for
these coolie wages and to break
down thefir resistance. They have
. .. .. , ... ,,
Sy ®*fJ" atlcally T been cutt * f re ie ^
«''^"here. In a om e states and
'.v l, f'
etc -> theiy have cu * °nt relief en
tirely in order to starve the people :
into submission. !
Tkis Program, can ard must be
defeated. Farmers, workers and
unemployed must umtel and fight
f ° r dMe "' and aT1 American
stardarH of living Demand pre
vailing w ages on all relief Jobs, j
_ A
j** "| j
= I7fW I OW THE !
j ronu/n ta !
CROWD TO
I ill » Xlirto
HANK S
1
-
!
2 1
OLD STYLE LAGER I ;
[ :
| j
j
PLACE
-
!
i
f
— and —
GREAT FALLS BEER j
Krebsbach and Î
Marsh
!
I
i
v
col
BRI
.
_ LANSING, Michigan, May 19.—Choos
ing this moment when the Dunckal Bill
aimed at the working class, is pending he.
fore the state legislature , the state sup!
rcme court y est erday held unconstitutional
the Michigan "Red Flag" statute, which de
C, ? reS that dlS £ ay °. f the red flag in par
ade ® or assemblies IS evidence that it it
as an emblem of anarchy."
MICHIGAN SUPREME COURT
OUTLAWS RED FLAG
YOU CAN NOT
CAW NU1
BLAME A FATHER
npfJVPP m n , „ ^
. DENVER, Colo., May 19 —Howard Hod
shell, 40 father of eight Children and
ber of the local Unemployment Council, was
fined $25 and sent to jail in lieu of pay
ment by Municipal Judge Alvin H. Pickens
on a charge of striking Charles J. Blout,
who was responsible for the Hodshell tam
ing being cut off relief.
Several hours after Hodshell's alleged
clash with Blout, which is said to have tak
en place in front of the local relief station
welfare bureau sent a large basket of
groceries to the Hodshell family, which wL
suffering from acute hunger,
POLICE ARREST NEGRO,
LYNCHERS GO FREE
DALLAS, Texas, May 19.—A gang of
white farmers attempted to lynch Allen E.
Samuel, 32-year old Negro farm hand, at
Richardson, Tex., yesterday, after the
worker had defended himself when attack
ed by Jack Holland, white farmer.
The lynch gang had started torturing
Samuel when officers intervened, arresting
the Negro worker. No arrests were made
of any of the lynch gang.
mem
OFFICIALS WHITE
WASH MURDERERS
m LaGRANGE, Ga., May 19.—Sergeant S.
T. Stone and Corporal O. D. Smith were
quickly acquitted by a court martial, con
ducted by their National Guard officers, in
the killing of Fonie Stephens, textile work
er, who was killed by National Guard troops
when they evicted him from his home.
The troops were called out to protect
strikebreakers at the Callaway mills, which
went on strike in February. C. Callaway,
the owner, is a close personal friend of
President Roosevelt.
The whitewash by the court martial
covers up the severe terrorization of the
strikers, who have been evicted, beaten and
i n the case of Stephens, murdered at the
hands of the troops. The workers
striking against the speed-up.
are
THERE IS SOMETHING
FISHY ABOUT THIS
CINCINNATI, Ohio, May 16.—One hun
dred men became violently ill today after
eating of breakfast of cornmeal buns, pork
sausage and coffee in a federal relief din
ing room. Issuance of food to 1,900 others
wa s stopped immediately. An investiga
tion disclosed cooks probably had used a
can of insectide in preparing the food.
IT IS "RED," NO
DOUBT ABOUT IT
SACRAMENTO, Calif .—The declaration
of independence is too radical to be used
in school. So think sponsors of anti-radical
bills in the California legislature.
A bill by Assemblyman Lee Geyer, a
Garlena school teacher, would have requir
ed reading of the first two paragraphs of
the declaration of independence and the
preamble and bill of rights of the constitu
tion, at least once each term.
Assemblyman Gardner Johnson, Berke
ley, opposed the measure before the assem
bly education committee, charging that ij
inspired by those opposed to anti-rao
ical bills. He claimed it was a move v>
sow seeds of sedition in the school roon ^'
A move to table the bill was defeated
but the bill failed to muster enough vo
to be sent out to the assembly.
was
IT NEEDED CLEAN
ING, ALRIGHT
DODGE CITY, Kan.—After recent««*®
had stopped the dust storms, Fred n
decided to clean the attic of his hom 6 *^,
a suction pump he removed 4,2(W P 0
of dirt.

xml | txt