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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, October 04, 1935, Image 1

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
__ Official Or gan of Farmers Holiday Association of Montana
-- - PLENTYWOOP, 3JBBRIDAN COUNTY, MONTA MA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1935
'
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W
. ,-tf-wide weHtly
i ! «11 program»
*•' ««'•'S , P«ducti«
Owned by a group of farm*
ere and subsidized by
body, it prints the new* tha
papers af Big Business 4a
not give you.
Ä 1
.-■m
r'.'X
m
V;*-;
■y
No. 28.
xvni.
PUBLIBCtBB WEEKLY
-■.V;..
f^OtEAISYSTEM
R , JOHN PAINE
Drei)
GREAT SYSTEM!
peace *Be*With You
Hull called the attention
*r; or ld powers to the Kel
( & * - means of prevent
tfl '
of
Sr if 1 * s *
doing it the sign -
busy prepar-j
being
for pea 26 '
[prs of
ir«
Italian armr «a?
Africa and was
the Alps.
Tie
I.
àm ** 10
„idtmr- >n
, Tlie French
Jrfodin* its >var games.
, tv British navy » strength
1 ro central fn the Med
,tfr*n ean -
I The German
reinforced.
waa just
army
»a*
army's power
** ^Tthe United States arm . y
*■ finished big movements m
York state.
kid P*'
New
WE'VE TAKEN
PEACE SURE ARE
THE .STEPS
TOWARDS
iepeessive. ^ #
. leaguers are worrying
Jiuht fate of the nation's po
Sea . „
"come out V ^th
, îw dofw
Something like "Mud for every
«n<r for instance.
kH rr yuan TRAIN RECENT
LY KILLED SIX WORKERS.
GYPPING MUSSOLINI OF THE
küsuRE?
wunw • • •
llealy-MoutHs?
P
Hattie Caraway, head of the Wo
L n > National Republican Club,
nation to
prrn the
L e the constitution.
F \y f disagree with Hattie's whole i
approach.
[ Looking at the season's
LtIw for feminine finery, we'd say
Iht constitution needs an amend- j
beat to save the women.
new
Simile
ICH AS GRIEF STRIKEN AS A
pnStOOSEVELT CONDOLE N C E
SUbHviRE TO MRS. HUEY LONG,
That suppressed horse laugh
rhich you can hear echoing around
he countryside is the reaction of
lie voters back home to the speech
of local congressmen telling
anj^Bieir constituents hoNv they restor
gjjjHé prosperity to the nation.
Memo for Future Soldiers
<)■ the eve of the war in Ethi
pia, new high levels for the year
E s reached by the following
ks listed on the ..New York
let:
U. S. Steel; Remignton-Rand;
htfVjfvt; Aiiiied Chemical; and Inti
'ickel.
imiJTY GROUP HITS SO
!UUST TREND IN U. S.—head
I
me.
I HEAVY INDUSTRIES JOIN IN
UÄPSW1NG— PRIVATELY F I N
kodaflkKCED CONSTRUCTION AD
sting®kN'CES.—headline.
CALIFORNIA'S B I G BUSI
_fcSSMEN ARE REPORTED TO
PV SPENDING LOTS OF MON
COdHV "TRAINING COMMUNITY
■•EADERP TO DEAL WITH OUT
WIDE AGITATORS.''
■ WHAT?
■ WALL STREET GOUD IN THE
-OLDEN STATE?
* *
J^° r °ld Adolf is finding that
don't like unsportsman
ike treatment of minorities.
So he's the world's football, just
[y ltlD g kicked around with his
piympsc Gaines.
in
JJARRY HOPKINS IS VETO
^ RELIEF PLANS TO BUILD
WOOLS - AND BUILDING
^HOUSES INSTEAD.
** the VVPA BUILT SCHOOL
OGSES it WOULD
N
HAVE TO
lumber, bricks, etc.—
giving private EM
DY
us
wYMENT.
8 * *)
[T ' S A GREAT SYSTEM!
lt Jumps Up
On Chgo. Market
SEJ
(JfffV 0
k !*- - —- Soaring the
, mi ^ Permitted for one
M With * ?f rfare in Africa.
the £j heat re -
m seven years,
Presence of war con
, *i grain T. 0minant factor in
Heted m S Cets . and Prices sky
W*eitKrit broa dest buying
* in the *jr ths . wa * witness
«Ve *5®? ? xt h ere, and the
rushed shorts to cover.
klWs? lres hitures ranged
7-/' open ti „T
H. open 01 , cIose ' 51.06.
' close - 96.
r --
ri — Children On Relief
J*°* than 7 a™ ,..
$ V Î 16 vear* If 000 chll dren un
T .I constitué ape , are on relief,
r» ^ total t near 'y 40 percent
relief ÏÏ? b< : r of Persons
roU8 m the United
7 Sported
on<
m
f
as
Wheat * $1.03, dose,
Kay
ct'
$
J
PALY INVADES ETHIOPIA
••v

*
Both hides Issue Orders
for General Mobilization
Italian Air Armadas Fly Over Ethiopia Raining Death
and Destruction On Sleeping Towns. Several Hun
dred Casualties Including Women and Children Are
Reported. Premier Mussolini Announces It As War
of Conquest.
!
1
As the Producers News goes to press, radio
announces
that war in Ethiopia has begun. Both sides have ordered
general mobilization.
Armadas of Italian planes have in
vaded Ethiopia, raining bombs and a terror of death and des
traction on Ethiopian towns, including the capital at Addis
Ababa. Casualties are reported as several hundred.
Diplomats of France and England have announced that
they will immediately demand that the League punish Italy,
by the application of sanctions, for its invasion of Ethiopia.
*
—*
ROME, Oct. 2.—Benito Musso
lini, premier of Italy and fascist
leader, today pledged his nation to
meet force with force and to bear
economic sanctions
pline."
Victim Sues Leader
Of Merchants" Mob
SAN FRANCISCO. — Fred
Cairns, secretary of the Her
aldsburg Chamber of Com
merce, was sued this week for
with disci
"War,
with war.
He 'was heard by millions of fas
he said, "would be met
$25,000 as an aftermath of a
business men's "tar and feather
party" on August 21 for the
purpose of "discouraging labor
agitation among fruit and vege
table pickers.
The suit was commenced by
Jack Green, one of the victims,
who claims he was kidnaped and
seriously injured by the mer
chants' mob.
*•
. j . , .
Judge Rescinds Drastic Sen
tenrec Imnowl at Trials
fences imposed ai t nais
MISSOURI FARMERS
ARE ALL PAROLED
Last Week.
PLATTSBURG. Mo—Recalling
into court this week the fourteen
farmers found guilty of contempt
and conspiracy to interfere with
federal officers, Judge Reeves
granted probation to them, instead
of requiring the serving of jail
and federal penitentiary sentences
handed out to the men Saturday.
All the men were placed on pro
bation for a two year period with
the exception of Clifford Gall, of
ficial of the Farmers Protective
Association and farn* leader, who
was placed on probation for five
years.
Harrison Jones, who was too ill
to be sentenced last Saturday, was
also given a two year probation
period.
The sale of the Sam Divelbliss
farm. Svhich had been set for ifbis
week, has been set aside indefin
itely. Divelbliss said he expected
to file an application to re-estab
lish his farm under the newly en
acted Frazier-Lemke act.
j
j
Pressure On Labor
Continues Downward
decent Surveys Show That Labor Gets Less and Less of
the Wealth It Produces; No Coming Improvement
Seen Unless Labor Gets More Militant
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1.—The downward pressure of
employers on wages is tending to send payrolls lower and is
definitely arresting the recovery of làbor's income. Much
more powerful upward pressure by the workers is required
o overcome the growing strength of the bosses, who are
all excited about the "breathing spell" they expect to
now
get from the New Deal. . AA
Figures giving a monthly index of payrolls, with 100
the 1923 to 1925 average, have just been compiled by
equal
the U. S. Bureau of Labor
eoods and the non-durable
industries
The combined index for durable
goods includes iron and steel, ma
chinery, transportation equipment,
railroad repair shops, non-ferrous
metals, lumber and allied products,
and stone, clay and glass products.
The non-durable goods index
eludes chemicals, foods, leathers,
textiles and their products, rubber
products, paper and printing, and
tobacco manufacture.
Downward Curves
Both curves registered a terrible
downsweep between 1929 and 1932,
but it was the shrinkage of pay
rolls in the durable goods mdus
tries to one-quarter of their size
that brought the most intense mis
ery to labor. If the figures rep
resented in this ghastly decline
were analyzed, they would tell of
tens of thousands of suicides, hun
dreds of thousands of families
torn apart and millions of spirits
hopelessly broken.
It is the monstrous damage
wrought by the pursuit of profits
m
cist in uniforms who, thrilled by
the knowledge that war with Ethi
opia might be imminent, massed in
every city and village of the na
tion at a sudden call 0 f mobiliza
tion.
Il duce, in the light of huge
flaming oil pots, spoke into a mic
rophone on the balcony of Venezia
palace.
He told his listeners that he did
not believe "real French" or "gen
uine British" would execute sanc
tions against Italy.
He declared: "A solemn hour is
about to break in history."
Mussolini spoke 15 minutes.
Discussing sanctions—the pun
ishment of aggressor nations under
the League of Nations covenant,
he declared:
We will not pretend. To econ
omic sanctions, we 'will reply with
the discipline of our people,
, militarv ones, we will reply with
j military action.
Virtually the entire population
of Italy had gathered in a general
mobilization.
*1 Speak to 20 Million"
"Blackshirt men and women of
Italy," said Mussolini, "I speak to
20,000,000 men and women."
For several minutes before and
after his appearance, the crowd
roared in salute of il duce. The
swelling chorus of voices drowned
out all other sounds.
Then il duce declared:
Not only our army marches to
ward its goal, but 44,000,000 Ital
ians are marching with the army."
He said Italy would respond to
"war with war.
He declared he did not believe
that "the real French associate
themselves with sanctions against
Italy.
Mussolini said that the league
instead of recognizing Italy's
rights, talks sanctions."
He added;
I refuse to believe that the gen
uine British will associate them
( Continued on pag®
To
U
11
a
Statistics for both the durable
goods*--; ; ~ ~
that is lar ff el y responsible today
for the feebleness of labor's efforts
to recoup its losses. It was great
est in the durable goods industries
where the bosses are strongest and
labor is weakest.
Payrolls to Lower
However, capital may soon begin
to rebuild its industrial plant more
vigorously, and for a time this may
give greater employment to the j
durable goods lines. A strong push )
in the field of modem housing
might have an important effect.
But unless something happens
definitely to change present ten
dencies, payrolls are not going
much higher in 1936. Wages may
even be reduced and hours length
ened, and in that case it would he
possible for payrolls even to show
a downward tendency.
If this is to be arrested, and
payrolls pushed higher, labor must
bestir itself more vigorously than
it has in the past few years and
develop a more effective fighting
organization.
October 19
On the above date, which will be the last day
of the Farmers Union state convention at Lewia
town, representatives of many other groups will
gather there. Progressive members of the last leg
islature, labor union delegates. Farm Holiday mem
bers, Socialists, Technocrats, Workers Party leaders
and possjbly Communists will be on hand. The pur
pose is to frame a legislation program for Montana.
No convention in the history of the state has
ever been so important. It is now perfectly clear to
every fair minded student of public affairs that
hope of any return to prosperity thru national ac
tion is nil. The Republican party is one hundred
per cent for Wall Street and will nominate a one hun
dred per cent Wall Street candidate. Roosevelt will
be renominated on the Democratic ticket. He has
been, is, and will be against Wall Street only by lip
service. Lack of finance anl no avenues of publicity
will prevent any new radical party from getting far
toward capture of national power.
If betterment Tor the great mass of people,
workers, farmers and small business men, is to come
druing the next five or six years, it must come thru
action within the states. The program formulated
at Lewistown will determine that line of action. It
must be a program designed to start taking Mon
tana's wealth and economic control away from our
absentee owners and landlords and not a program
designed for the primary purpose of permitting
fawning politicians to ride to power.
Italian People Balking War
Masses of Workers Are Demonstrating and Otherwise
Voicing Objection to Imperialism of Premier
Mussolini; Troopers Are Deserting
Distinguished Orator to
Visit Plentywood
Max Schachtman, member of
the Political Committee and the
National Committee of ithe Work
ers Party, U. &. will speak in
Plentywood some time in the
early part of November—exact
date to be announced later.
Max Schaotman is a national
ly known figure and is distin
guished for his brilliance as a
speaker and writer. It is doubt
ful if the people of Sheridan
County have ever had an oppor
tunity to Ibear a more gifted ora
tor.
Watch for details in the com
in g issue of the Producers News.
WHEAT PROGRAM
EXPLAINED HERE
Forty-five wheat committeemen
from 15 communities met in Plen
tywood Monday to hear a bout the
new wheat adjustment plan. R. G.
Tyler, president of the County Con
trol Association, presided at the
meeting. C. H. Peterson of Boze
man gave a summary of conditions
which led up to the necessity for
a controlled production program,
M. J. Peterson, county extension
agent, explained the new contract
features. A general discussion of
the new rulings was conducted by
C. H. Peterson. 1
According to M. J. Peterson,
county extension agent, the main
features of the new wheat program
are as follows:
1. Any bona fide wheat grow
er who can establish a base is
eligible to sign the new contract.
2. Period of-contract, 4 years
—1936. 1937, 1938 and 1939.
3. The reduction of acreage
for next year has been announc
ed by the secretary of agricul
ture to be five per cent. This
to be figured from the same
acreage as the old contract.
4. Carries the provision that
a signer may have the privilege
of terminating his contract after
two years have expired.
S- Smc ?, base . Pf* ,od for
Hgurmg aHotmemts vs the same
W T ,d ^
a good idea for those who did
not sign before, but who wish to
participate in the benefits of the
new program,, to start now to ob
tain . Production records—acres
planted, acres harvested, amd
bushels .Harvested for the place
they will farm m 1936. These
records to be obtained for the
years 1928 to 1932 inclusive, and
yields are to be supported by evi
dence in the way of duplicate
elevator tickets, farm record
books, etc.
6. Allotment payments are to
be made in two installments as
heretofore, but the basis for mak
ing them will be changed. The
first installment will amount to
approximatejy two-thirds of the
difference between the average
farm price and parity price on
a representative date prior to
July 1 of the year for which the
payment is to be made. The
second payment will be adjusted
(upward or downward depending
on the average price of wheat
during the year.
7. The 1936-39 program pro
vides a method by which the al
lotment committee may make
certain limited acreage adjust
(Ooatfaund m Pa«* Tom)
Further
news of internal strife in Italy,
caused by Italians violently object
ing to Mussolini's campaign of ag
gression in Abysinnia, has slipped
past the strict Italian censorship.
In scores of villages large dem
onstrations are being held against
the War, in some cases soldiers
called upon to suppress these dem
a n nd r Ä h mÄ ed Si?ily%«
again on strike, it is reliably re
ported.
On the borders of Yugoslavia,
LONDON. — (FP)
men
across the borders into Yugoslavia,
deserters from the Italian forces.
In Parma, Leghorn and other
places, wives and mothers, follow
ing the example set in Caltanis
setta, mobbed railway stations to
prevent the departure of troop
trains.
In Siana, mobilized militia re
fused to leave. Wives and moth
ers of Massa held demonstrations
in front of fascist headquarters.
In Sicily, Palermo, South Mauro,
Corleone and Vittoria, there have
been demonstrations ending in con
flicts with the police. During
fighting resulting from a demon
stration at Acausanta in the prov
ince of Abruzzia, two peasants and
a non-commissioned officer were
killed. Troops ordered to disperse
the mob refused to obey the com
mand to fire.
In Cremona, peasants demon
strated against the war, singing
Bandiera Rosa (the Red Flag), a
song of Italian radicals,
In many other places, too
snatches of Bandiera Rosa are be
ing heard for the first time since
1920. The song has even been
heard among the ranks of the sol
diers, who, in Milan, fought mil
itia men on the station platform,
Gen. Babbini, commander of the
Sabauda division, has sept a cir
cular letter to the Italian com
manders urgently recommending
leniency with the ranks and ask
ing them to pay particular atten
tion to the morale of the men.
In Pavia> in ^ north , a regi
ment . g sai( j to have mutinied, de
posed its officers, and command
eered a train o[n home .
At the sulphur Siines in Sicily,
m i ner s who struck at the first mo
bilization order have struck again,
A large number of the 70 dock
ers on their Way to Africa deserted
at Genoa. In Milan a crowd
stormed the barracks, smashing
windows and shouting slogans.
and a
What purports to be a literal
translation of a soldiers' song be
j np sung frequently, but in secret,
j n Italy, is: "The sergeants and
a djutants are all parrots. But for
the high officers, We are digging
the graves. And if we are sent
to Abysinnia, we shall not remain
there. We shall tell the Abysin
nians we are not at home there,
Pete Lee Will Sell Farm
Equipment at Auction
Pete Lee, who lives on Blue trail
12 miles east of Plentywood, has
rented his farm ar.d will offer all
livestock, workstock, harness, ma
chinery, household goods, furniture
tools and miscellaneous equipment
at public auction on Thursday, Oct.
10 .
R. R. Ueland 'will cry the sale.
A free lunch will be served at noon
to be followed by the sale. Terms
are cash. Mr. Lee has recently
been engaged in the trucking busi
ness at little Falls. Minn.
$280,000 GRAFT
-*
Year's Crime Cost
Half of U. S. Debt
Crime continues to be the
tion's most expensive "luxury."
The cost to the country, accord
ing to the Federal Bureau of
Investigation, reaches the
tronomical figure of $15,000,000
COO a year, or about half the
national debt. That figures out
at the rate of $120 a year for
every person.
Equally astounding was the
claim that one-fourth of the
population has a police record.
na
as
STRIKE SETTLED;
BRUTAL KILLINGS
YETSAMETERMS
Mayor Latimer Now Busy
Investigating and Trying
to Fix Blame Elsewhere ;
Grand Jurors Fix No
Blame.
MINNEAPOLIS, Oct. 2.—After
two innocent persons were killed
fron Wks nJ striké has bwHettS I
on exactly the same terms under
which it could have been settled (
two months ago. . !
after the bîSJ^oitbreakJnwhS
police used builets and tear gas
bombs to disperse a crowd around
the P^nt of^the Recalcitrant Flour
Walter
I
killings,
Meanwhile several investigations i
have been started the Principal j
or Thomas E. Latimer. Nothing
consequence has come from the
grand jury's inquiry. The jurors !
have pinned the blame for the
i mg^on^ no ^"^ ngibility ;
Some of the policemen involved
in the riot, it was said, are slated
for severe disciplinary measures,
mam 'Ä"io" leTte^mtaed
to fix responsibility, to get all the
facts and let punishment fall where
it is deserved.
Mr. Latimer has insisted on
questioning all the witnesses per
sonally, and has obtained informa
tion from scores of persons, news
paper men, policemen, strikers,
pickets, labor leaders, victims of
L/iiy Iron Works company. Tho
Wältcr dictatorial Hoad
of the concern and an ally of the
Citizens' Alliance, had said repeat
edly he had nothing to arbitrate,
a thoroly aroused public opinion
brought him to terms after the
of
and
are near the iron works plant.
"Tear Gas Only"
Who did the shooting and w,ho
ordered it has not yet been defin,
itely determined in official circles,,
but police executives are said to
have told the mayor the orders
Were to use tear gas only—not
guns. How and why the shooting
started and who fired the shots
which killed two boys and wounded
several others are details which
the mayor is said to be determined
to learn.
30-30 Bullet Found
An interesting detail Was the
finding of a 30-30 calibre bullet.
It does not fit any police equip
ment, and is believed to have come
from a high powered rifle, such
hired strikebreakers might have.
There have been charges that the
iron plant itself housed guns, am
munition and a number of paid
thugs, but there was ample time
for evacuation of such forces be
tween the time the riot ended at
midnight and the closing of the
plant next forenoon.
Seek Alliance Connection
The mayor's investigation also,
it was said, is directing inquiry
into the possibility of direct ag
the dispute bv hired
as
gravation
operatives of the Citizens' Alliance,
of which Tetzlaff was a leading
member. „ , ..
The terms to which Tetzlaff ag
reed and under Which his employ
ees returned to work are the same
as those agreed to by other iron
works plant shortly after demands
were made in July.
G. V. Hansen Schedules
Auction Sale for Oct. 12
Another auction sale of farm
equipment now scheduled is that of
G. V. Hansen, set for Oct. 12 at
one o'clock. ,
Mr. Hansen, who lives about
three miles northeast of Antelope,
has rented his place and is closing
out all machinery, household goods,
horses, miscellaneous equipment
and supplies. He made no an
• - ement as to his plans for
a; I
the future.
Sale bills now out name R. R.
auctioneer and D. O.
Terms are
Ueland
Danielson as clerk,
cash.
In Hay Purchased
By Relief Âdminis
tration Is Revealed
i
Dr. Butler, Relief Administrator, Transfers Quigley From
Position as Hay Purchasing Agent to Take On Am
I nsider" Who Pays Long Prices to Favorite*
ii
Big Money Press Is Silent
: K
Report of R. J. Quigley, Prominent Rancher and Stock
man, Reveals How the Graft Was Put Over and
I-. ' ŸÎ
Who Benefited Through the Transaction*
HELENA, Mont., Sept. 30.—(Special)—Charges, sub
stantiated by the affidavit of a man of indisputably high
character and standing, made to officials in Washington, that
the tid Y sum of $280,000 represented rakeoffs undoubtedly
made by speculators in hay only, "cooperating" with mem
bers of the relief personnel, under the direction of Dr. W.
J. Butler, state relief administrator at the time, never wer*
« iven any Publicity, and certainly no action has been take«
against the relief employees who were instrumental In en
gineering the various questionable deals. Apparently the
federal penitentiaries have not been built to house politician*
;:S
m
«
■ v;
jUfh l^es tbei. staging before the pubUc una-s^iled.
And the public is kept in ignorance of facts because of a
muzzled press.
R J. Quigley, formerly one of Montana's leading Stock
men and ranchers, whose statement appears later in thi*
story, when engaged by Dr. Butler as field purchasing ag
e nt to purchase hay, as he states, started on his job with
understanding that the hay was to be purchased from
the growers by the Relief Administration and passed to th*
stockmen in the drouth-stricken areas of the state without
any tribute to profit greedy speculators. It appears that his
conce pti 0 n of his duties were not in accord with the ideas
Dr- B " tler „ a ? d . ^ associates and when this was made
cleai* to Mr. Quigley, he resigned his position.
One C. B. Quinn, an employee --—-
to resign, or step out in some other manner not detrimental
to their dignity, when their work gets too raw and exposure
seems imminent, and are "taken care of" in some manner
who steal from the government. This gentry are permitted
of the Missoula Mercantile com
p any 0 f Missoula, Was appointed to
take Mr. Quigley's place at a sal
ar y an( j expense allowance, report
; e( j to have been double the amount
j p a jH to Mr. Quiglcÿ. Presumably
this was brought about through an
"emergency," since the Missoula
Mercantile company had already at
that time, according to reports,
speculated in the purchase of hay
j f or re lief purposes to the tune of
Republicans Will
Disfranchise Poor
$1
V
Prominent Party Leader In Minnesota Initiates Move
ment to Amend Constitution So Those Receiving i.
Government Aid May Not Vote
f;
k
ST. PAUL, Minn., Oct. 1.—Baring one of the most ruth
less designs against human rights ever to be proposed by
any political group in modem America, one of the state's
Republican leaders this week cast aside pretense and publicly
announced that Conservatives will launch an attempt before
the special session of the state legislature which would dis
franchise more than a quarter of a million persons in Minne
sota because they are poor.
Making his disclosure in the name of "preserving the
balance of power set up under the federal constitution," he
proposed that the constitution itself, which the Republican
party has set out to "protect" from®--!
human rights amendments, shall be
amended to snatch the right to
vote away from every person who
shall be on relief.
Thus the most acute sufferers
under^the present economic sys
tem would be denied the right to
vote to change it.
The proposal was made in an
address by Kay Todd, St. Paul Re
publican who managed the 1934
senatorial campaign of Tom Davis,
during which that fiery orator led
the Republican attack on the
Farmer-Labor platform with a bar
rage of red-baiting charges of
"Communism" and "Sovietism."
Relief a Matter of Degrees
Degrees of economic dependency
vary, it was pointed out, as do de
grees of relief. To take the ballot
away from all receiving relief
would mean to disfranchise up
wards of half a million voters and
children.
Receiving relief, some degree of
government aid, and therefore "un
six or seven thousand tons *1
Prices to the grower of six dollar»
to nine dollars per ton in the stack,
'Fhis hay was repea\ dly offered
by this company to the govern
nient at $13.50 delivered
However, with Quigley purchasing
an< ^ insisting that the grower get
P 6r t on an d that only the cost
. baling be added, the above wen
tioned "emergency" developed from v;,;v
(Continued on page 4)
on trade.
•• *
•',*4
Ï '
qualified" to pass upon the amount
of that relief under the Conserva
tives' proposal, there are or will
be by Dec. 1, in Minnesota:
304,000 on direct relief, listed by
the SERA; 36,000 farmers, bene
ficiaries of Farm Credit Adminis
tration loans; 50,000 recipient» of
federal seed, feed and RACC loan»;
21,500 Home Owners Loan corpor
ation borrowers; 10,000 war veter
ans receiving U. S. veterans bur
eau compensation; 4,000 veterans
under the State Veterans' Relief
Administration ; 3,000 disabled vet
erans in soldiers' homes and hos
pitals—a total of 427,600 in soma :
degree "dependent."
These "vets" who Svould be de
nied the right to vote in the coun-l
try for which they paid their price
of illness and torture, include 284
men and 147 women, some of them
veterans of almost ancient wars,
now housed in the State Soldiers*
4 )

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