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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, January 10, 1936, Image 1

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«fcl OrtiüAu aoô.èTv
OF MONI /»na
THE PRODUCERS NEWS
*m ja umM
. ******
* g»«c«—- __
•V ti«H* l| '*F*|
*1
I ja A 101 S a iq peu*o
Official Organ of Farmers Holiday Association of Montana
PLENTYWOOD, SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA. FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1936
•flW
PUBLISHED WEEKLY
XVTII. NO- 42
V$*
gœiæra
and Hoare of
be hav
U* <* »
&$"»*££ trouble at home fol
M^phn to bring peace
, *SÎSi** M "» 1 t . h# be t
w *■* - Ethiopia to Italy.
French and English l*"P' e
, "„uiect to a "Peace on
»ppar«^ 1 /, to Men*' scheme_
11 We gets Ms
Ethiopians get the
Sîrliofthe bigshot diplomats.
to
/ *° tC . r
0 f adoptions of
Ike midwest
Recovery
ft,, number
. throußhoui —
«aoi« 3 «■" • „ rc at as
•g three tua*-' **» R
«ear
holiday season m
cmii<I the
*(&, ar B .^ the Venn
!Snia Railroad, and save lots
y*Z v on the tram fares.
*fSL only r»7.3U to make 1
J m m! trip from W \ork •
^Ith faces so 1°** looks
Y"-h there won't be enough ■
left around Manhattan
'keep the city going- -
... Ywih Department !
«run tV Carnegie Endow
International Peace was
fltTlt .qio due to the vision
Jûroeitv* of Andrew Car
.»npted its Work in a
'«it» different from the
u S»"—cress release
w ld toaay. k
qv«e was still in the ox-cart
•riod in 1910," says the same
talletin. ,
Weil Judging from the head
rifht now, it hasn't as yet
OTuiated "God's children and got
winM seem to be on
D i anes
V Not Department
— „„1 oo n »p fpnt of
•h W90 only 28 per cMit of
** 6 or nearly
t. 93 - 49 American
S r LS to a rtate
Äeyl^t^^nithSd
• • •
0WT , their farms free of
.. „ d,«. * P Whitn»v of
n .l'l, 0 f Railroad
îiinmen Äiglt t^ F^
2! iîïi« «SSnîl conven
1
i
Lighthouses in daytime use
•e going to be tried out by the
hydrographic office of the navy
Is combat fog.
And, presumely, if the tests
9t successful, they'll install a
pie is Washington.
•«.r« . V l «.o
•««fits of a Coordinated Press.
Count Ciano, 11 Dace's
VVa
• ♦ •
A N«w York social group 1»
saving a means of aiding il
lepiMmate children.
They might join their broth
ers in some of those 100 per
patriot outfits.
o • •
Sodal ser?ke workers in Cin
dhati are facing technological
•employment.
The city's welfare department
ii hiring thugs instead of so
cial workers—probably on the
b»si* that the gangsters' tech
nique is more persuasive than
the Rentier methods of the old
lashioiu'd case workers.
ZTf™' V Ti
»r^türe ag<» as returning from
«
TllK INDIANS GOT A NEW
U Ai. TIES YEAR, BOASTS
tvr TCKrs OP THE DEPART
MPVT OF THE INTERIOR !N
Be 'V\T U. REPORT.
jr\}. WKUF. GLAD SOME-,
1>!D.
Tradgedy
: on the Am
Uariem weekly
n-icier ing walking
®w* un a VU tie strike of their
• n.
Ï* ..
bec<
Slfjfc,-» r - •
Hr
\
ITT,
r»> .,i
n *y* which they haven't
A—vhing, is being cut !
• a
hnd .-in
. .
- 1 1
, ,
many homeless
•'vr g 'tVUnlfp a ? d inf 1 of
l l0t of
1 ', An ,chimneys.
S r
thi !<*'.
Ti'!
r*"!'
•; :.s
easy
i e )Tr>a?.
.*»••• so
d: !
»»•f
tim,
IIJIV
AMERICAN LIBERTY
WAmcKlir TOPl«
TRI*\* I» TOW \RI)S 1 »ITT ATHTÎ
SIUV 1 TOWARDS DICTATOR
TEAT'S WHAT WF ('All
UFI iLMUTiriBc.
$KI.F-C'H1TVCISM.
PYF APPLICATIONS
RYE APPLICATIONS
The Sheridan county wheat al
lotirent committee has definitely
*1 Wednesday, January 15. as
th' final date for accepting appli
cath.m for the Rye Production
Ad.hjstrrrnt Pron-am. Applica
line«» may he made through com
ynp.-cmen or at the County
tendon office. ,
The necessity of some régula
ticr. of the rve crop is apparent
of the two-year supply
P'lcd nn at the present time. Tiiis
•urplu? has depressed prices so
that ve producers are receiving
fe» than 40 percent of a fair ex
charge vale, based on 1909-14,
W who kave xaiaea
1933-35 inclusive are eUgîble to
Join in the program.
!
n*S A GREAT SYSTEM l
aOSING DATE FOR
b,.
crusp
Kills AAA
Fort Peck Workers
Fighting for Relief
IN LETTER TO STATE ADMINISTRATOR WM.
RUFFCORN DEMAND $65.00 PER MONTH MINI
MUM FOR TWO. $15 PER MONTH FOR EACH
ADDITIONAL DEPENDENT—ALSO TAKE MAT
TER UP WITH HOPKINS i
1
i
[Ur
The 'worker? at Fort Peck, liv
ing in the many tar-paper shack
towns that have grown up there
like mushrooms since the great
project started, who have recently
been laid off by the thousands
without a moments warning, after
having been congregated there
from everywhere, or if not laid
off, have had their hours and
vvages cut below starvation levels,
are now trying to organize and
I have made some headway.
q,, workers are organizing
,^V e f f a ? s Sicallv
p r Jj ec t workers themselves
into a Federal Labor Union along
j industrial lines under an Amen
^ tomen
and (b) everybody, men, women,
, Quth ^ symp athizer s in a Vdde
an( i loose organization called the
"Fort Peck League for the De
^ ense of the American Standard
Living." ,^e first o .
I
|cf =
tion is organizing the woAen on
the job for shorter hours and
better working conditions, that is
union conditions so .that the work
er s may have a voice m the mat
iter which they have not now. The
second organization b aai organ
ization for the bettering of the so
cial conditions generally, and for
the procuring of more and bette»
relief, adequate to maintain «
"American Standard of laving.
Both organizations have made
j organizational and other
progress, and made some fight
ifor better conditions, carrying on
some disconnected sort of public
(ity campaign explaining the con
dirions at Fort Peck. These re
leases have been sent to the Pro
ducers News and other papers
day by day. The Producers News
has published these as they have
come from the officers of the or
ganizations, giving the readers
some notion of the conditions at
Fort Peck, and the activities of
the workers. . , ,
Most of the workers activities
so far have been in the way of
meeting? in the different settle
ments, g where speakers have pic
tured the situatino and criticized
those responsible, and resolutions
have been passed and letters auth
ri | d t0 the Montana Congress
aviator£.
- _
some
n m n nv tnri
MOST RELIEF
MONEY SPENT
Tft ni,Y FOnn
I II J5Ul I*UUU
1V ^ ^
-
C tate A uc |i t Sh OWS $7,272,
5t ?!e n . j 14_ 11C _
746 Devoted to House
hold Necessities
TjfTTDxrA To,, v Tr.tî.1 «sum?
counties! for the whole
re ?. ei } ed by ' , ,,
rehef penod % e « as follows
c ^ u^rn i6 '?120 WS'
' ^

ter, $463,143; ~~
Dawson, $256 371;
$961,734; Fallon, $126,887;
^ $257é 5!; Flathead, $409,962;
Galiatin, $113,814; Garfield, $102,-,
819- Glacier, $78,856; Golden Val
i ley/ $58,833; Granite, $58,396.
Hill, $316,444; Jefferson, $i7,
7 ! Judith Basin, $40 443; Lake.
$216,688; Lewis and Clark, $24o,
B07; Liberty> $24,884; Lincoln,
$95,962; Madison, $89^683; 1 c_
Cone, $130,45$; Meagher, $44,-.
S26; Rosebud, $105,381, S
$90,326; Shendan, $465,124, SU
ver Bow, $4.790.758; Stillwater.
$125,851; Sweet Grass, $34.578, ,
Teton, $29.807; Tool*. $H2 e^,
Treasure. $47,581; Valley, $37.
Wheatland, $66,849, W »
Ex-.$6o.721; Aellowstone, $^ 3 >
Commodities und
which the money was exp
and the amount devoted to n
follows; „«»»«unties
; Food and household ne
$7,272,746; shelter, $84, < _ v}( ).
ing, $1,181.544; fuel, ^^30^
public utility semce, $33,38o,
medical care. ^26,363; seed f
$51,407; other pur^^s $89.031.
administration, $1,153,373.
830; Mineral, $66,501; Missoula.
$605,020; Musselshell, $332,W,
Park, $213,665; Petroleum, $&«s,
529; Phillips, $142,686.
Pondera, $81,286; Powder River,
ional delegation, the Governor and
the several relief set-ups of the
state, and to the army officers in
charge of affairs at the dam, and
the contractors on the dam. De
mand? have been made that Sena
tors Wheeler and Murray and
Congressman Ayers come to the
project and meet with the workers
and investigate the situation, and
speak at the Workers' meeting,
■ but there has been not report on
'this matter. Secretary James D.
Graham of the Montana State
Federation of Labor was up to
Fort Peck, and investigated the
( f ur ther report on the matters,
l5iso a demand has been made for
rnnmuiimi] investieation but
„J? dmumd
. ^ 3 ^ renorted
or So the
f ™e ien re
W™* ^^duc.is 3
News
w hich are printed in the or

«yoRKFRS ASK FARMERS
FARMERS
1U ««^ *"** letter
*Jie Fede gjndler of the i
SSSïT iSStaS un2î !
o{ 28th, asked the
_ em ^ erK Q f tb at organization to
. . the discharging of George
SSi^ter his union activities, j
Tbe utter- !
Dec. 28, 1936.!
Dear Mr. Kindler,
Federal Union No. —(A. P. of
L charter applied for, approved
^ Valley County Trades and La
lb J r> C oZd\, and by James D.
Graham, President of the Mon
tana Federation of Labor) is a
union f or all unorganized work
i er the Fort Peck dam. It was
organized about the middle of
No B vember . 0 n December 12 the
president of the Union, George
Walters, Svas fired without notice,
'although he was a permanent
civil service employee. Walters
^ exp€rt powde/ man. who had
heen kept on during seven months
of the ?lack season (for powder
wor k) i n order to be available
for ice breaking in the spring. In
order t0 k eep him on at ?1.2U the
government had to call him an
tino . foreman, although the*«
to do as
wa? very .him
foreman When Winter came on
= «Ä
that several hundred stumps were
actually flagged the day he was
(Continued on page four)
(Continu Po
-——
SHFRIHAN LOIiNTY
ÜliLilUi/rill vvwiil a
mniiTiinrim ni 1T1Y
TflWNSFND
I U II 11 O L* 11 */ vLiwU
. «mmC
ORllANl/FlS TliîIRS
Ab - Ut 200 Meet «t Court
pZZehfcSlp^'
rrepare tOi campaign
» «
«...
About tw0 hundred adherents
of the Tobend Old Age Pen
sion pi an m et at the Sheridan
coun ty court house, Thursday
night , perfected an oiganization
and t00 k the first po^tive steps
in preparing to participate m the
coming election campaign.
There were no outside speakers
„ ;
SZ STÆÂ-.
r^llins Secretary. i
Oscar Collins, b ry
Wm . ghinners. Treasurer 1
The Execu tive committee is
osed of the following citi
^ Forest Go odman, George
j ac kson, and Nels Olson, togeth
er w ith the above ° ffl . cia1 /*
The organization will hold reg
ular meetmgs where the pnnpi
pleg and prog ram of the orgamz
ation will be discussed every
Thursday evening in the court
room at the court house. As
a? is leasable regular lecturers^
^ be brought in
Townsend Old Age Pension
^ ttSVSSS* S**
* vSSSon campaign.
tms
^ the loca i organization will
sp0 nsor a series of meetings in
the county to occur in the not too
distant future. .
Tbe following officers were el
a -UÂ/dï"» h .
American people would require
an increase over 1929 produc
S" JL"ÄS««. ÄÜ
the increases required: Meat, i
10%; poultry, 35%; milk, 75%
butter, 100%; vegetables, 25%;
fruit, 70%; eggs, 50%,
Figure? are from ithe Nat- !
ional of Potential Pro
Survey
Capacity.
;
I
FIREWORKS FLARE
ON MONTANA'S
POLITICAL HORIZON
Chairman McGregor Rc
. I m »J5cation of
. senis tmpilC 1 n
j Cooney in Liquor
Rarlc#»!
ivatKci
- t
JABS AT CRITICS
_
Secretary of State Sam Mitchell
and Attorney General Ray Nagle
have constituted a majority on
the state liquor control board
since its inceptimi, and if^at any
Ö the ^wfr S
change them, is the declaration of
Dr. H. J. McGregor, chairman of
the state highWay commission
and a lonrUm e S friend of the late
Governor Cooney in commenting
0 nS SSSmU cf^b^a
cSv^ring Uquor advertising. Dr.
M^oralsoadvancedt he
that the present system of Uquor i
inurchases was unsound, holding
that such purchases should be in|£
If STStf pSrchSing
^ ant
g Address at Stockett
His renï^ on Sf subject,
contained in an address prepared
for delivery Monday evening at
a miners' union meeting at Miners
ffisS. follow:
"In recent press dispatches I
have noticed that the Montana
liquor board issued a signed let
ter in which the press give* them
credit for stopping a so-called li
quor advertising racket. The for
mer Governor of Montana, Frank
H. Cooney, had been in his grave
scarcely three weeks when he was
accused of being responsible for a
; racket in 'which the liquor ads
were given to a certain newspap
er. Isn't it a strange thine that
two members of the liquor board,
Sam Mitchell, secreary of state,
and Ray Nagle, attorney general,
sat on this board with Governor
Cooney since the law was passed
and never did anyone hear them
c av anvthing against such prac
tices Which ar e now charged to
Governor Cooney? These two
men constituted a control of the
b0 ard and bv their votes could at
any time have stopped the so-cal
led liquor advertising racket, and
(Continued on page four)
__ -1
_, r Mimnv IDDir . T!AM DDOirrT
BIG MUDDY IRRIGATION PROJECT
BY R. !.. WHEELER, County Surveyor
_^_—_
I-----—-- " „ .
| The following facts are for the Roosevelt County would petition
consideration of the farmers, Congress to appropnate sufOcient
sportsmen and taxpayers of Shei- fund? to complete this project .
idan county. v The State Water Conservation
A g F eat b asm extei ? ds f J.°. m th E Board needs our help They can- ;
Canadian line to the Missouri rn £ d o Fbi? alone. T f w T e do not,
River, through this county. It is
drained by the Big Muddy B iver
and its various t-ibutaries. Every
aprine the water which falls cn
tI,is b ' B w atershed ' , man . v st l u ?T e
>-* » - ^^%h I u\^ood?|
h
carrying it off, where it Wl do
good to anybody, and is lost to
our farmeis.
About a year ago the State
Planning Board asked our P e 0P-®
to designate a project which
would be useful and beneficial to
sJ ■£«;
no
WQuld b | useful .
h hol county
and J suggestcd i
which is wasted
tbe Muddy Valley be Meld oacK, oy
K"«Sf fiKWa
SU« Water ComervaUon Board,
X S SS%
® d the survey made. S c V
j S comlpeted; and the State Water
Conservation Board ha? approved
this as an economical and ser
vireable project. HoWeyer the
Congressional .appropriation [ 0 v
Montana was insuffle e t ^
vide for all the proj c . P
propnation? will be made, f^
those projects vhich tbe peopjeo
Montana are able to demonrtr
are most needful for the . e
welfare. , bv
The su'vev which was 5
S H,t e Water Conservation
Board has been duly fo^ward^
As County Surveyor 1 J ade
'taxpayers of Sheridan County and
dams and d ikes, so that it could
not on i y be used for ?urface im<
ga ti 0 n but also for sub-irrigation.
The State Planning Boaid agreed
to take up tbe matter with the
'.Congressman Monaghan
°
a J | . I « j
Announces /Tjs Landtdacy
|
Jor United Siales Senate
- *
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.. . . . ^****™^
_
Congressman Joseph P. Monaghan
°f Batte, who has announced his
candidacy for the United States
*«*te on the democratic ticket.
-
1\* 1) • J «
1OH00T lA^SIUCnt
1 IUUCC1 lirWUCUl
ri n*
C DlYlufi
UUWW UIT1UC
-
f Mrs. Nels P. Moe, one of Sheri
dan county's oldest settlers, a re
^cted l^y of 74 years, and. the
mother of twelve children, expired
at the home of her eldest son,
Emil Moe, on the Moe farm near
Archer Monday following an ex
tended illness. Many of the good
old lady's children Were, at her
bedside when she passed away.
Mrs. Moe came to the AtxAer
country with her husband, r.
Moe, who died a few years ago,
26 years ago, where they took a
homestead, and Schere she naa
rince made: her home. Her death
thins the thinning ranks of the ;
brave and hardy pioneers
made the county.
The funeral services were.held
from the Lutheran church in
Plentywood. Wednesday ^ter
noon at 2 o clock. Rev. Orval A.
Smith officiated. Six sons acted
as pallbearers. Interment was
made m the Plentywood Lutheran!
cemetery.
OBITUARY
j Mrs. Moe. whose maiden name,
(Continued on page three)
gj Ve them our combined support,
we may never have another
chance. We are grateful te f ; 7
for wh at they have done; and wr
should express our appreciation
^ . 5hort time ag0 , thre8 .
ue> because of the lack of feed!
and wa t er . Many valuable animals
w^ere killed because thev were too
weak aTld tb i n to winter. Many
others died because of the lack of
feed
rrh:«, wa c te would never had oc
ÂÀS-ÆÂip
asa-r-fsa.:
^ Ä :
SmisS-i*.
a t ÂÂÆ :
State Water Conservation Board •
. ith tbe pro 1ect, anH that
g^Wpropriate sufficient
completion of such
* An we need now is the
P Qn J certed efforts of the farmers
and taxpayers to help us put in
these dams and tbus back up this
wafer means dollais in the
pocketg of oUr f arme rs. It means
lowered taxeg for our taxpayers.
, ft mean« game refuges which wi'l
save our wild game for our
spor t srn en and their son? who are
^ up , and who rtherVise wiH
^ * do M their Rhooti n g at*
gophers and jackrabbits.
to put this project
IS ENDORSED BY
THE TOWNSENDERS
Young Native Son of Mon
tana Has Made a Re
markable Political Career
Congressman Joseph P. Mona
S han - who represented the First
District for the past four years
in Congess, announces in Wash
ington that he will be a candidate
for the United States Senate to
fill the regular full term of the
office made vacant by the death j
of Senator Walsh in 1933. "Great- J
er opportunity for public service,"
be sta t e8> "impels me to be a cau
didate for the United States Sen
Iate."
ENDORSED
BY TOWNSENDITES
1 formed that the State^Board
1 °f tke Townsend Old Age Pension
organization had endorsed Mona
ghan for election to the United
statea Senate( Congressman Me
Groarty of Californit telegraphed
^ w ^ lliam Thomason of Deer
for confirmation; "Under
stand State Townsend Old Age
Pension Board of Montana endor
sed Congressman Monaghan for
the United States Senate in forth-1
coming election and insists upon
Ws ^coming a candidate.. Please
advise Whether or not this good
news to m-^jnd other Townsend
supporters is correct, (s) Jolm
Steven Me Groarty, MC Eleventh
District, California. To which
the following reply was received:
Happy to advise Congress
ma n Monaghan first choice af
OAPP State Organization in
Montana for United States Sen
ate. Two other candidates with
draw m Monaghan s favor C»)
w m Thomason President Pow
ÿ County Townsend Club,
Montana.
Congressman Monaghan nas
ma< j e pe n8 i 0 n legislation his maj
Qr congressional activity, in par
ticul „ havtag introduced and
ored the Trfwnsend Plan as
^ amendment to the Social Se
curity Act and having filed a
tit f on to brin g the McGroarty
BiU embo dying the Townsend
pian ; ^ a yo y te . to this ac
t j v j t and as 0 ne of his first of
fidal act3) Mr. Monaghan intro
duced m 01d Age p ens ion Bill.
ln a United Press dispatch
from Washington, January 6.
I 1934, Duane Wilson said:
<<rmityppssnia|1 JoseDh P . Mon .
ag han. (Dem) of
dpvnt» a maior nart of
tÄr-JsroJTS
««.
women who have become sup
eranmiated and who are now
d d on relat i ve8 or char
(2) it >vould relieve un
ty ' ^ in tha t aged work
^ P ' n ° 0 y " {o ' TCed to continue on
their jobs could retire thus mak
^ wav f or younger men and
women"
MON AGHAN SUPPORTED
raiLWAA PENSION BILL
K ^ W ^ na g ha - n later cireulated
pet ' it i on t0 block the adjourn-■
re-enacted in »
(Continued on page two)
*----*
»'rrtttcu FOREIGN OFFICE *
, HAL rf| PUBLICATION OF *
, MUSSOLINI EXPOSE *
, MUSSOLI NI ,
• vnRK _ The Brit- *
:
s?is«s
"ÄfrÄ :
A^ed"'gold' WOr ' d " ar
to n ^T%Zs TZ
Brocktvay Independent Labor
p nr tv leader who has visited *
America on peaking tours, *
Br^kwîy comments; "You •
y hov much sincereity *
there in the opposition of •
our government to Mussolini." •
xim Balahanoff articles were
p^hed in the U. S. in the*
People's Press and are ap
pe aring currently in Norway,
Sweden and Holland. They
te i| bow the author met Mus
sollnl in Switzerland when he
• w a8 Jnnikss and loathe
somely diseased and how she
helped him to her later sor
' »ÄÄ » 5 ÄJS
HELD UNCONSTITUTIONAL AS INVADING
STATE RIGHTS - THREE JUDGES DISSENT
a
DECISION DEMOLISHING PILLAR OF 'NEW DEAL'
FARM RECOVERY PROGRAM, ALSO WRECKS
COTTON CONTROL, TOBACCO AND NEW PO
TATO ACT PROCESSING TAXES VOIDED
AND STOPPED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 6—The United States supreme
court today killed the AAA—main pillar of the adminis
tration farm program—in a sharply worded opinion which
cast serious doubts over the legality of other vital new
deal reform and recovery acts.
The recovery agency announced soon afterward that it
woud stop all benefit payments immediately.
In a 6 to 3 decision, the nations highest tribunal held
that the AAA was wholly unconstitutional because it in
vaded the rights of states in seeking to control farm pro
duction. The whole system of processing taxes imposed to
finance the program was swept into discard.
Developments in connection with the devastating opin
ion today included;
1. The government may be compelled to impose new
taxes. President Roosevelt said in his budget message to
day that AAA would be made a permanent part of the
government.
2. The federal treasury
have to pay more than $600,000,-j
000 pledged to certain groups o
farmers for cooperation in crop
reduction.
3. President Roosevelt confer
red immediately with Secretary
of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace.
Attorney General Homer S. Cum
mmgs
leaders to stu
prepare new _legislation.
4. Congressional leaders p •
diet«! the decision would add
man v weeks to the present ses
sion of congress. . ,
5 A dissenting opinion
by th e t ^ at
Uend* *?T n ® d » ' monooolv
courts did not P° y
oncapacityte govern ^ ^
tSd' up'hi the
00,1 other Arts Affected
Collection of nrocessiong tax
• stopped immediately,
55 AAA bounced Wou ^ d
benefit payments immediate
stop bencm p ym
As the full scope of the opin
; became known lawyers, said
it pro bably doomed;
_ R Vhe ad cotton control act.
™ v^ S^th tXcco a?
Th« Jerr bimtn tooacco ac ,
mMsures
These three d Pj
? arry 5
ions through the impositio
^ taxes on
operatmg with the govern
The new deal itself did not
,these acts but w^ force t *
ce El^ h wEl by f SiVan sugar act a
^TheJones-Costrgansugar^a
P " f rt -r telt the decision of
Jjj- Ä ÎSE^.iS
Vegalitv of the Guffey
,me , r tn f ie Ç-„i, • " M „ f nv m
Çëiilt r.
ig^zf*****
if^TlSS 5
• a «qittle NRA" on the coal
Sstrv regardless of it? "doubt
J"? r omtitutionalitv." The issue
expected to hinge on the
decision oAhe court as to wheth
d ? Mtuminous coal is an interstate
industrv and thus subject to fed
era j regulation.
PresiHem qmile«»
_ ,. -pppîve,! the
President Roo t re
crush«« new,iwift .i ™.leJfc
tetary Wallace nas c01 l^ r . e
mined to pass substitute legirta
tl,«, dcci=.
. in e p outiml e ect 01 p __
tt P /^r®™ Jv sb ' renublican
^ tl r is'"now uo to
New York, said it is now up to
*be republicans _ t0 .
;iRS&"ÄS.!fS
.
-i&ss&as
opinion w M 8i gn.
^
a «TaffÂ
r , i Fvans Huehes
tV* Î m >»* »ffprt g that congress
d i d J^-tion to P au Thorize the gov
Ae^ amount of
®IT t on com h^gs wheat, peanuts,
rice 0 ' r otb êr products any man
hts farm.
"«oVds pressing Tax Invalid
"° lds Croces g x
Also, the court held, the con
gress has no Tight; to tax^ one
groun of citizens, in tl - •
processors to , pa V 3 '
in this case the farmers,
operating
The opinion ruled the program a*.
*/ h VÄt" F sTôneTeï
may#—-
Brandies> It held that the govem
ment wa3 perfectly within ita
^ in ^ to red uce crop
surpluses, raise farm prices and
bri ^ gtability to agriculture. Pro
taxes, it was maintained,
~ under the general
welfare clause ^ the constitution.
that
The dissenters said bluntly
the personss dissatisfied with laws
being enacted should go to the
^ Vhip the party in pow
^ot «eî rSou^Sly in the
The c<wrtS( the opinion
continued, do not have a monop
"yTenacity ^ to govern. The
trio added the stern warning that
courts, if they continue, may
destroy "an indestructible union
0 f in/ertructible
Justice Roberts, the only farm
er on the bench, reviewed the pn>
visions of the act, the claims of
the government and the challenge
of the processing taxes brought
by receivers for the Hoosac MiUs.
Inc., of Massachussets.
Announced by Justice Roberts
states."
Before him sat William H. But
i er receiver of the company,
former chairman of the republican
national committee and close
fHend ot the lTc Calvm CoolWge.
mend ci tne mic tm, n t. g
tw ^J*Ttbi ^tton oniZn b^
h.TSh tha^th® court
hod w'wn Lked to intern^
îiff Ü wPlSplnuRP of P the
***SSSL Ä whfdi the gov
constitution unaer wn c t 8
® r J™ ent based lts defe 86 f
AAA.
ilE on ca ™ e î rOTn R ^ ert 0 s hps JE
8l ^ pr e C ,se tones these word.
7 hlCh spelled the doom of the v t
^rm program:
' tax tb ® appropriation of
. '.
the fund? raised, the direction for
r
ÇMSBÿTS fJft
^- the argument? they had placed
before him They insisted the
cr< ?P /eduction agreements were
voJuntary. The court held these
P a </ S w fj e , tbe r ^ su,t of coercion
and could bring financial rum to
! a ^ mer , s /J® t co-operating under
scheme.
RevisionHope? Blasted
Hopes that the administration
might revise the act, keeping it»
fi'work as the base for ' new
legislation of the same character,
SSÄ'ÄK
^
* The Bankhea d cotton control act
which impose? a 56 per cent gin
injr tax, he held, is merely anoth
er measure to force recalcitrants
into line - The act is before the
c(mrt nQw and a decîsion on
had been expected today. Rob
ES'"®"""" "
to
it
,f
Slone, "an ™
appeal fro™ nnwiae
aws recourse is not to -he
courts but to the ballot. Stone
admonished sternly. He Waved
a8lde . the majority opinion s de
claration that the processing tax
benefit system was coercive,
Utters Warning
"It is enough to say that no
such contention is preyed on the
taxpayer, and no such consequen
ceg , w ^ re to be anticipated or ap
pear to ba ve resulted from the ad
ministration of the act.
Then, emphasizing each word
gl , ' he uttered this crisp warn
ing:
Interpretation of our great
charter of government which pro
ceeds on any assupmtion that tha
(Continuad on paga two)
a

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