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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, April 24, 1936, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1936-04-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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ÄE FARMERS UNION WANT
^resettlement liberalized
F-.t Coalridge Farmers
E 1 Vo 370, at its meet
Ctff East Coalridge April
•jtf h# holding its usual pro
' A écossions and the transac
■ r 0utine business, after con
V 'f, Consideration, passed the
jiderab'e olut i on , anent _ that
foil?'''^„settlement Admimstra
i^d asking for more rural
rfrk for farm Iabor>
: fHE RESOLUTION
„„.„rio The Resettlement
ftll -^tioi, considered in the
A«® 1 "'"'* L the only friendly Je~
psst yea » » vernme nt seeking
destitute and unfor
"■ farmers and their families,
faced -with a move for cut
-■ i'n its allotment of funds
I 'fiLuld seriously cripple im
I «»* economic as well as hu
ISSU efforts by this depart
' WHEREAS. Rural relief is still
I f viral importance; the relief
I I w.m of our farmers and farm
I at least here in the North
for * is vet far from solved or
aterially improved, and
.«essitates the continuation of the
Su= relief projects and services
:''rtcent years, together With some
Kjons and liberalizing;
WHEREAS, The gainful
jC among our farmers and
workers has not been ade
Sely taken care of; a marked
tendency has been towards urban
labor projects at the expense of
the rural workers; and in the ma
tir government projects the ten
dency has been towards skilled la
■ bor and modern power machinery,
Jo the great disadvantage of our
I rural inexperienced or semi-skilled
I workers;
I WHEREAS, Great many worthy
■ conscientious "border-line" relief
■ clients have in the past been ruth
■ lessly debarred and humiliated
J from receiving needed assistance
I from their government, ora fair
H chance at gainful employment;
THEREFORE, Be it Resolved,
m that we strongly urge the increase
H of funds for the Resettlement Ad
Ê ministration so that its functions
;■ may continue unhampered, and in
Ê addition allow for a broadening of
m its scope and liberalizing of its
■ efforts;
That semi-skilled, or farmer
I skilled projects be promoted thru
M out the rural districts whereby the
9 great number of farmers and farm
■ workers in that classification may
secure badly needed gainful em
I ployment to supplement their
«meager farm incomes;
I That "border line" clients be
jH&iven equal opportunity with the
m so-called destitute, in relief aid as
■ we 'l as employment;
The
ate
tun
iOW
vest,
m
even
re
em
ployment
farm
IN OUR OFFICE
1
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That refinancing of delinquent
taxes and other threatening fore
closures be promoted thereby an
opportunity is given our farmers
and home owners to nreserve their
equities in order to rebuild and re
establish within their former home
environment, among friends,
known ground, under known'
ditions;
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
That ample funds should be made
available for the encouragement
and increase of cooperative enter
prises that tend toward improving
home and community development
and rehabilitation of the rural
earning power.
Adopted by East Coalridge
Farmers Union, Local 370, Dag
mar, Montana, April 6, 1036.
HENRY B. SYYERUD,
Sec.-Treas.
on
con
Resolution Committee—
Henry Haaven
Edgar I. Syverud
Marinus Ibsen
The Farmers Union members
discussed the direct and 'work re
lief situation as it relates ito the
farmer in considerable detail, also
the feed loan situation, coming to
very definite and sound conclu
sions therein, on the basis of the
actual situation.
CRACKS —WISE
AND OTHEWISE i
Fascism is lawlessness orga
nized under the name of law
and order." — Johannes Steel,
foreign editor, New York Post.
* * ♦
"Our big employers have Work
ed themselves to the top by their
suprior qualities, and these quali
ties, which again are only proof of
racial superiority, give them the
right to lead."—Adolf Hitler.
* * *
'When the point is reached
where it becomes clear and con
vincing that the equity of the
government in the railroads can
only be protected and conserved
by socializing them, the govern
ment will be compelled to take
them over."—Pres. Wm. Green,
American Federation of Labor.
* ♦ *
Floods and dust storms are not
the 'acts of God/ but evidences of
the ruthless exploitation of forests
under private ownership, and the
pressure upon the farmer of his
debts, mortgages and the dispro
portion between agricultural and
industrial prices, which force up
on him the wasteful cultivation of
the soil."—May van Kleeck, direc
tor of industrial studies, Russell
Sage Foundation.
(<
many interesting events enliven
FINAL WEEKS OF SCHOOL YEAR
STEGNER
school vofi ^Ti° months of . the
but enSi Wl11 PT0 7 e *2 be Du * y
ofthoEi 6 i? ne i s f S r th ?- pupils
srramt w SC | hool f* T wo fme pr0 '
fT a . ms bave already been present
ea to the people of the community
and more are to follow. The en
tertainment by the Public Speak
the late f one b y the
1f partment of the ^rade and
we ^ at,tended and
enjoyoa. Both programs gave a
cross section of the Work being
aone m these departments of the
scn ° o1 *
r»Axin onnnr
^ ^ PROM
ihere are two important events
on the calendar for this week.
snow at the local theatre on Fri
aay evening is being given through
the courtesy of Mr. Jackson, for
the purpose of raising money for
the band trip to Havre on May
Jth. On Saturday evening the
junior class will hold its annual
Invitations have been sent
out this week by a class commit
u be Junior-Senior banquet
which was originally planned for
this same Saturday, will be held
dunng the week ending May 16.
♦ * *
TRACK MEETS
TWO EVENTS
The Plentywood track team will
take part in two or more Meets
during the next few weeks. The
District Meet will be held in Out
look this Saturday, April 25. The
next Saturday, May 2 Will be the
day for the Big 4 Meet «to be held
as in former years, at Culbertson.
This is the most important of the
Meets that the local team will
have a chance to take part in. The
other Meets considered are to be
held at Crosby and Williston. A
few selected members of the track
team may have a chance to take
part in the Great Falls and Uni
versity Meets. Horseshoe and kit
tenball are getting much attention
from the boys not out for track.
The girls are becoming interested
in the latter game which can well
be played by both girls and boys
from the high school down through
the lower grades. A program of
recreational activities which will
include both girls and boys, and
which will carry over to the years
beyond high school, is gradually
being built up. It is hoped that as
interest increases and facilities
are secured, practically every pupil
in the school will find his place in
a sports and recreational activity.
♦ ♦ ♦
SENIOR PLAY
NEW FIRES"
On May 1st, the senior play will
be offered to the public.
prom.

New
Fires" is an exceptionally fine play
having the qualities of interest, en
tertainm ent and educational value
t0 a hi ^ h de 8 ree - R should prove
be the best play ever offered by
the local high school,
• ♦ ♦ .
GRADUATING EXERCISES
MANY EVENTS
Senior Class Da y exercises will
be held on Wednesday, May 20th.
'Ibis is alWays an especially bright
day for the senior class. The
Class Will, Prophecy, History, etc.
are presented at this time. The
Baccalauerate service will be con
ducted in the school auditorium by
R ev - Shmidt of the Plentywood
Lutheran church, assisted by
or more of the Plentywood min
Theisters. These services will be held
at-11 a. m. Sunday, May 24. Com
mencement exercises will be hei3
on Wednesday evening in the audi
torium, following baccalaureate,
The date is May 27.
type of commencement program
will be put on as in recent years.
Several members of the
class 'will present various phases
of a chosen theme so that the class
will have a definite and important
part in its own commencement pro
gram. There will be an outside
speaker again this year. Dr. R.
E. Albright of the State Normal
will give an address on a subject
that will be announced later. Dr.
Albright was in Plentywood seven
y ears ago and his message was
v . er y favorably received at that
time * We are looking forward to
bis second visit with great pleas
ure *
one
The same
senior
FINAL EXAMS.
TERM ENDS
Although the work of the seniors
will be concluded with their Com- '
mencement exercises, the balance
of the school body will continue in
session until Friday. Examina
tions, repairing textbooks and the
giving out of report cards will
make a busy Week for everyone.
All teachers of the 1935-36 staff
have been re-elected for the com
ing year. Just which ones may
not return has not been decided.
There will no doubt be some re
adjustment of work for next year,
but the grade and subject lineup
will be essentially the same as for
the year just closing.
FARMERS!
Save up to one-third on
. your fuel bills by using
HYTENSE
PREVENTS CARBON
Costs one cent per gallon
to treat fuel. Costs $1
for can to treat 100
gallons.
GUARANTEED Tested and
Approved by Automotive Test
Laboratories.
MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED
Producers News
County Distributors
Plentywood
Montana
Millions prefer it to
^mayonnaise
O Miracle Whip 2s different— deli
cious I The time-honored ingredi
ents of mayonnaise and'old-fash
i ned boiled dressing are combined
i) a new, skillful way. Given the
1< îg, thorough beating that French
ciicfs recommend for ideal flavor
and smoothness—in
the Miracle Whip
beater that's ixclu
siv4 with Kraft.
""*1
L*
w
ant
Ads
f # ^ ^
FOR SALE—Rhode Island Red,
pure blood, setting eggs, 36c per
setting. H. Shirtliff, iPlenty
5-ltp.
wood.
WANTED—Man and wife to live
on farm. Chris Jacobsen, Rt. 2,
Froid, Mont . 2-4tp
PIANO BARGAIN—We are forced
to repossess in your vicinity a
small bungalow model piano, like
new. Responsible part
have same by paying
due. For particulars write Or
ton Brothers, Box 626, Great
Falls, Mont.
may
lance
4-3c
FOR SALE—Township blue prints
showing original homestead en
tries. Formerly sold for $1 each,
now 25c each, 3 for 60c. The
Producers News.
tf
FOR SALE—Old newspapers, 6
cents the bundle, at Producers
News.
WANTED TO TRADE—Subscrip
tion to the Producers NeWs for
butter and eggs, regular market
price.
FARMERS—Increase the results
of your motor fuel one-third to
one-half treating it with BY
TE NSE, costs one cent per gal
lon; one can will treat 100 gals.
Cost $1 per can. Buy a can at
The Producers News Office.
PROFESSIONAL
DIRECTORY
DR. W. D. ROY
Dentist
Phone 119
Plentywood
Howard M. Lewis
LAWYER
A. C ERICKSON
Attorney-at-Law
Practice In All Courts
Plentywood - Montana
SHERIDAN GO UNIT
ABSTRACT COMPANY
Johnson THE Abstractman
Only the Beat Abstracts of Title
Plentywood. Mont.*
OpHmiHiniMiiiiiiimiiiHiiiimmiiiiiiHiimiiimiintmMI
I DR. WOODWORTH T
I Osteopathic Physician
PHONE 92
Plentywood
Montana
p
If you can't find what yen s ilt
anywhere else, eall at
Foster's Exchange

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