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The Kalispell bee. [volume] (Kalispell, Mont.) 1901-1901, March 01, 1901, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST:
Fair tonight and Saturday.
The Kalispell Bee.
5 O'CLOCK.
---
Historical 8o^sty sf - M o wtana .
VOL. I. NO. 103.
Oc O
KALISPELL, MONTANA, FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 1, 1901.
FIVE CENTS.
SIX GIRLS PERISHED
IN THE FLAMES
Fire Destroys Five Story Building at Roches
ter, New York.
Rochester, N. Y., March 1.—A 5
story building at Platt and Mill street
was gutted by fire today. Three bod
ies have already been removed from
the building, and many Injured have
CONRAD IS
CLIMBING UP.
Thirteen Voves Were Cast for
Him Today.
ROAD LAW PASSED.
The House is Wrangling Over the Bill
Against Prejudiced
Judges.
Special Dispatch to the Bee:
Helena, March 1. — W. G. Con
rad made further gains at today's
vote on Senator. The following was
the vote: Thomas Carter 32; H. L.
Frank 30; W. G. Conrad 13; Walter
Cooper 9; John Macginnis 8; Joseph
K. Toole 1.
The Conrad vote came principally
from the former following of Macgin
nis, whose candidacy appears to be
going to pieces. The Macginnis men
will caucus tonight, to consider a
proposition from the Cooper men.
That proposition involves the adop
. on of a rule requiring two-thirds of
...e vote of the caucus to select a sen
ator, and makes the caucus binding
only in the event that 48 fuSf (Trusts
sign the agreement.
The senate today passed the Faust
road law and the bill creating a state
office of the coal mine inspector.
The house is wrangling this after
noon over senate bill 87, which was
put at the head or the calendar by
the steering committee today. The
hill provides for changes of venue
from judges that may be prejudiced
against a litigant.
JUDGE or THE
TWELFTH DISTRICT
Judge Tatton Barely Missed Being
Elected.
By his appointment as judge of
the new twelfth judicial district,
which was made by Governor Toole
immediately on his approval of the
hill creating the district, John W.
Tatton of Fort Benton secures an of
fice which he barely missed winning
in the election last fall. He was de
feated for judge of the fifth district
by E. K. Cheadle the republican
candidate, by a small majority, but
will now be judge of two of the
three counties composing that dis
trict—Valley and Choteau—Judge
Cheadle remaining judge of Fergus
county, composing the fifth district.
Judge Tatton is a native of Ire
land, and is a well preserved man be
tween 55 and 60 years of age. He
came to Montana in 1872 as ai soldier
in the United States army and, when
his term of service expired, engaged
in the practice of law at Fort Ben
ton, where he has remained ever
since. He began the study of law
while he was still a soldier and oc
casionally practiced in courts mar
tial.
Ju'dge Tatton has the reputation of
being learned in all branches of law,
and has made a name as a skilled
criminal lawyer, especially as a
prosecutor.
INTEREST HAS
NOT BEEN PAID
Maryland Brewing Company In Bad
Condition.
Baltimore, March 1.—The interest
on $5,500,000 six per cent bonds, is
sued Dy the Maryland Brewing com
pany, due today, was not paid, and
the probabilities are that the con
cern will shortly pass into the hands
of a receiver for the purpose of fore
closing the mortgage and reorganiz
ing the company.
Wheat Quotations.
Chicago, March 1.—Wheat 75 1-2.
San Francisco, March 1.—Wheat,
vt., 95.
been taken to the hospitals.
It is reported that six giçls who
are missing have perished In the
flames.
WOOD THINKS
IT'S ALL RIGHT
Says the Cubans Will Come
To Taw
FOR THEIR OWN GOOD
Cuban Governor General Says Cubans
Will Not Make Serious
Objections.
Washington March 1.—The cabinet
at the meeting today talked over the
Cuban situation and Secretary Root
read telegrams from General Wood
saying that, in his opinion, the Cu
bans would soon become convinced
that the action congress in fixing the
relations which should exist between
Cuba and the United States, was for
their interest, and would accept
them without serious objections.
A CHANCE FOR
WHISKY DEALERS
Place Big Ads in Paper Edited By
Mrs Nation.
Mrs. Carrie Nation was in charge
of the Peoria, 111., Journal, one day
this week. In her leading editorial
she said: "I have never hurt a hair
on the heads of my bad brothers,
the saloon keepers, and hope for
pity's sake none of them ever shall
get in the way of my hatchet, for it
gets dreadful reckless when it flies
around smashing that which murders
men."
Aside from writing some eight col
umns on the "Kansas Cyclone," she
also writes an account of her smash
ing career, in which she tells how
she happened to direct her energies
along this line.
Many of the best known writers of
the country contribute to the paper
The cartoons are those suggested by
Mrs. Nation. Whiskey firm adver
tisements are another feature, one
concern having an entire page.
ORDERS OF THE
WAR DEPARTMENT
American Troops In China Soon to Be
Transferred.
Washington, March 1.—Carrying
out the policy inaugurated by the
state department when it changed
the military force in China into a le
gation guard, the war department
has sent orders to General Chaffee
to still further reduce his force. It
is said at the war department that
arrangements have no yet been made
for bringing away the troops from
Pekin, and it is believed that this
cannot be done before the. latter part
of March. The troops are to go to
Manila.
HE DIED FROM
BLOOD POISON
Was Shot In the Leg and Death Re
sults.
Virginia City. Feb. 28.—Charlie
W. Lane, who was shot in the leg a
week ago yesterday by Newton Cow
an, died this afternoon at 3 o'clock,
from blood poisoning.
SUSPECTED MURDERER
STILL AT LARGE
He Was Seen at Drummond—Is An
Ex-Convict.
Anaconda, Feb. 28.—James Mc
Arthur. the ex-convict, suspected of
of the murder of Dotson is still at
large. He is believed to have been
seen at Drummond.
a
HIS STOCK
WENT DOWN.
Macginnis Loses Prestige at
Helena.
CONRAD AND COOPER
Have Gained Some.—Heinze Fights House
Bill 87.—Senate Away
Ahead.
Helena, Feb. 28.—Macginnis stock
went down today and Cooper aud
Conrad stock went up. The slump In
Macginnis holdings was a had one,
sending the young man from Silver
Bow down to 12. Crawford, Pelletier,
Pendergrass, Quinn and Sullivan,
of Silver Bow, flopped in a bunch
from Macginnis to Conrad. John
R. Toole, who has been voting for
Frank today voted for Conrad. The
suspicion grows that the Cooper men
are wooing the Macginnis combine
and the Macginnis men are making
goo goo eyes at Conrad whose sup
porters profess to believe that he will
win out. The vote: Carter 32;
Frank 29; Macginnis 12; Cooper 9;
Conrad 8; Toole 1; Clements 1.
Practically all business in the leg
islature is suspended by the flilibust
ering tactics adopted by the Heinze
Macginnis combine to prevent the
house acting on senate bill 87, which
proposes to prevent a biased judge
from sitting in civil actions. Although
the judiciary committee was ready
to report the bill favorably this morn
ing, the opposition tactics resulted
in sending the bill to the printing
committee for further delay and se
cured an adjournment before any
thing could be done. The senate has
business so well in hand that it held
only a morning session today, and ad
journed to tomorrow morning.
NEBRASKA PEN
IN Bums
One
Convict Perished in the
Flames.
THE LOSS IS $300,000.
The Prisoners Were Released Without
Much Difficulty -Little
Was Saved.
Lincoln, Neb., March 1.—The Ne
nraska state penitentiary is in ruins
from fire, and one convict, George
Pfleuger is dead. The loss will ex
ceed $300,000. The only building sav
ed was the east wing, the chapel and
a small reserve cell room. The pris
oners were released without difficul
ty. Search was made in the ruins
this morning and me remains of
Pfluger were discovered in his cell.
THE COURTS
MUST DECIDE
Before Pittsburg's Mayor Will give
Up His Office.
Pittsburg, Pa., March 1.—The
Pittsburg "Ripper Bill," which pass
ed the legislature yesterday will be
fought vociferiously by the present
city officers of Pittsburg and Alle
gheny, who under the provisions of
the new act are legislated out of
office. Mayor Diehl says that he
will retain his position as mayor of
Pittsburg until the higher courts de
clare otherwise.
THE DOMINICAN
CONFLICT SETTLED
General Amnesty Granted To Politi
cal Prisoners.
San Domingo, March 1.—The Hay
tien-Dominican conflict which arose
a few days ago owing to the consular
incident in Dajabon, has been settled,
Congress has decreed general amnes
ty for political prisoners.
The school commissioners of New
York city have just made public the
list of janitors of school buildings
for the coming year. It appears that
the average pay of the janitors is
about one-third greater than the
average pay of teachers in the pub
lic schools.
LAST CABINET
MEETING
Under the Existing Presidential
Term,
WAS HELD TODAY.
Griggs Will Retire in a Month.—Philan
derKnox, of Pittsburg, to Take
His Place.
Washington, March 1. —At a cab
inet meeting today, the last under
this presidential term, all the mem
bers presented their resignations to
taue effect on the qualificaions of
their successors. Attorney-General
Grigs who has decided not to retain
his position the coming four years,
was among the number, but his re
nomination will go to the senate along
with the others. He will not serve,
however, longer than about April 1,
when it is believed that Philander C.
Knox, of Pittsburg, will receive the
appointment.
NO MORE
CHECK STAMPS.
House and Senate's Agreement On
Revenue Bill.
A complete agreement has been
reached by the republican conferees
upon the most important items of
tne war revenue reduction bill. On
beer tne house wins its contention
and the senate yields. The house af
fixed a rate of $1.60 per barrel with
out any discount while the senate re
tained the old rate of $2 per barrel,
with a 25 per cent discount. The dif
ference between the two Yates is
about ten cents on the barrel. The
tobacco tax is compromised.
The house left the tax standing at
12 cents per pound as in the existing
law, while the senate reduced it 25
per cent, or to 9 cents per pound.
The compromise provides for a re
duction of two cents and forty-hun
dreths of a cent per pound, leaving
the rate 9.60. The house also comes
out ahead on bank checks. The house
repealed the entire tax on checks, but
the senate did not accept this atcion
The senate conferees now accede to
the house provision, .he reduction
in the revenue will be $7,000,000 on
account of this action. The house
provision entirely repealing the tax
on proprietary medicines is also ac
cepted .
HOW THE DEAL
WAS MADE.
Morgan Took Hold of it With Great
Reluctance.
The New York Times says: That
having maintained silence on the sub
ject of the new steei combine for
many weeks, J. P. Morgan while in
his office said, after he had read a
Boston publication which, contained
an article entitled: 'The United
States Steel Corporation—A Unifica
tion of Great Interests.' 'That is
the best statement of the situation
that has yet come ..o my notice. Had
I written it myself I could not have
stated the situation better.'
"The article makes the following
statement, which is the first authen
tic admission of the question which
brought the consolidation about:
" 'Mr. Carnegie recently threaten
ed to duplicate the mills of the vari
ous makers of finished products be
cause enough raw material was not
being purchased from him. The com
panies making the finisned ""products
tnreatened retaliation in Carnegie's
field, with the result that a sort of
industrial chaos was threatening in
tne steel and'iron trades and the se
curity markets of this country. '
"How Mr. Morgan was brought in
to this matter is stated as follows:
'Mr. Carnegie said he must pro
gress or go out of business. Other
terests said they must do the same
thing. Mr. J. P. Morgan was ask
ed to furnish some plan of solution,
with great reluctance he took hold
of the situation. Before proceeding,
however, Mr. Morgan demanded that
$200,000,000 should he promised him
by responsible banging and financial
interests should so much money be
needed. The money was promised
■I Mr. Morgan set to work. Mr.
Carnegie had. the largest plant and
the strongest position, and named his
terms of sale. However, he signified
Ms willingness to take securities in
ueu of cash, and negotiations pro
ceeded very rapidly.' "
SIR ALFRED MILNER
MAKES A START
Cape Town, March 1.—Sir Alfred
Milner has started northward to take
up his new duties as governor of the
Transvaal and Orange river colony.
off
on
ed
by
SIR THOMAS UPTON
GIVES INTERVIEW
Says the New Challenger Will Be a Radical
Departure from Usual Lines*
Glasgow, March 1.—Sir Thomas
Lipton in the course of an interview
informed the representatives of the
Associated Press that Shamrock X
was totally unlike any yacht ever
launched on the other side of the At*
lantic. The shape of the challeng
er he believed, will give the design
ers on both sides of the ocean food
for reflection.
to
of
re
1,
C.
the
On
of
On
af
re
dif
is
at
25
re
but
to
on
tax
ac
THE DAGOES
WILL KEEP IT.
Decided They May Hold Le
gation Grounjjf.
WILL BE COMPENSATED
Uncle
Sam Will Pay for Additional
Ground Taken From the
Chiirese.
London, March 1.—A dispatch
from Pekin says: It was decided to
day that the Italians are to retain
the customs property which they
seized on the ground that the cus
toms are purely a Chinese institution
and have no right to he within the
legation area. The American govern
ment is the only government which
has announced its intention to com
pensate the Chinese for the land re
quired to extend the legation grounds.
in
a
is
DISBARMENT
PROCEEDINGS
Are Instituted Against Attorney Li
kens.
Peter Breen, county attorney of
Silver Bow county, has filed an accu
sation in disbarment proceedings
W. W. I,ikons and the supreme
court made an order yesterday Tor
Likens to appear April 1 and show
cause why the petition should not
be granted.
The charge is tnat, when admitted
March 8, 1900, Likens took oath that
no criminal charge had been insti
tuted or prosecuted against him in
any jurisdiction. The Information
charges that he was convicted of a
felony at Boulder, Colo., May, 1885
went to the Colorado penitentiary
luay 27. 1885, and was discharged
ffom there July 27, 1888. The record
of the court of Boulder county shows
that he was convicted of forgery
and sentenced to four years impris
onment.
Likens' Colorado record was ob
tained by Mr. Breen from Lewis S.
Young, county attorney of Boulder
couniy Colo.*, to whom he described
Likens as an all round nuisance,
who nad practically lived in the
county jail for the last year and was
cotinually raising technical points in
criminal eases. .
NO CLAIMS
SETTLED YET
The Samoan Arbitrator Has Settled
Nothing Yet
London, March 1.—Lord Cran
borne, when questioned today regard
ing the claims originating from the
disturbance in Samoa in 1899, last
night said that none had been settled.
The arguments of the American and
British governments relating to mil
itary operations in Samoa not having
been presented to the arbitrator.
BRITISH SHIP
WITHOUT A CREW
Hopes Are Entertained That They
Have Been Saved.
London, March 1.—The British
steamer Indiana Venice was sighted
off Worthing this morning in a sink
ing condition. A life boat sent out
failed to discover any signs of life
on the steamer. Hopes are entertain
ed that the crew are aboard some
other vessel.
A German savant insists that, bar
ring accidents, the exact duration of
any person's life can be determined
by means of the X-rays.
Subscribe for the Daily Bee.
a
INERE IS NOT
MUCH TO IT.
Relations with Cuba Commit
tee Makes Report.
NO RECOMMENDATION
Made.- Postal Frauds Being Investigated
By the Cuban Courts, Says the
- Committee.
Washington. March 1.—Senator
Platt, chairman of the senate com
mittee on relations with Cuba sub
mited to the senate today the report
of that committee upon he results of
Us investigation into the irregulari
ties in Cuba. The committee de
tails the extent of its investigations
but makes no recommendation be
yond that connected with the follow
ing paragraph:
"In the opinion of the committee,
u.e information obtained is so full
and specific as to render further in
vestigation and inquiry unnecessary,
especially in view of the fact that
alleged frauds in connection with the
postal revenues of the island are
now being investigated by the courts
of Cuba.
TWO CHINESE
WERE BEHEADED
Ten Thousand Persons Witness the
Execution of Chinese Nobles.
A Pekin dispatch says: A crowd of
fully 10,000 persons witnessed the ex
ecution of Chih Su and Hsiu Cheng
Yu, who were beheaded here Wed
nesday in accordance with the de
mands of the powers. The members
of the various legations were con
spicuously absent, feeling that if they
were present they might seem to he
gloating over their fallen adversar
ies. Every power however, was
largely represented by military offi
cials and soldiers, and there was also
present a staff from each of the for
eign powers. Besides these, many
missionaries witnessed the execution.
The condemned men met death stoi
cally . in each case one blow severed
the head from the body. At the time
the execution was being carried out,
the ministers held a meeting and'
determined on the part of the ma
jority to draw a curtain over further
demands for blood.
THE RECEIPTS
AND DISBURSEMENTS
For January — State Treasurer's Re
port — Cash in hand.
Helena, Feb. 28.—The report of
State Treasurer Barret for the month
of February shows that the receipts
of the treasurer's office during the
month were $56,605.22, aud the dis
bursements $49,555. At the close of
business today there was a tbtal cash
balance in the difference of $673,741.
IT WAS VERY
QUICK WORK.
An Illinois Rapist Given An Indeter
minate Sentence.
Carrolltown, III., March 1.—Albert
Schenkte, who on December 25 last,
criminally assaulted me 18-year-old
daughter of Charles H. Dillor, was
today brought to Carrolltown. With
in an hour Schenkte had pleaded guil
ty, been given and indeterminate sen
tence, and was on his way to prison
at Chester.
George Anderson, a Scotchman,
recently patented in this country •
metho'd of setting diamonds or other
precious stones by electricity.

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