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The Kalispell bee. [volume] (Kalispell, Mont.) 1901-1901, July 01, 1901, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053328/1901-07-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEATHER FORECAST:
Tonight and Tuesday fair.
Thé^alispell Bee.
v.
5 O'CLOCK.
A
VOL. II; NO. 14.
KALI8PELL, MONT., MONDAY, JULY 1, 1901.
FIVE CENTS.
THE NEW BOAT
ISJU BOOB
Columbia Runs Away from
New Cup Defender
CONSTITUTION LOSES
Unless Subsequent TMals Show Better
Speed. The Columbia May
Defend Cup Again.
By Associated Press:
Point, R. I., July 1.—When the two
racing yachts Constitution and Colum
bia hoisted their sails for the first
race of the season between Americas
cup defender yachts, the breeze in
side the bay was very light and the
yachts had some difficulty in getting
out to the starting point. The con
test was a windward and leewar af
fair of thirty miles. By the time the
yachts reached the light ship they
found a good breeze from the south
west. The starting gun was fired at
11:45 a.m. The Columbia crosse 1 the
line first. Both boats went across the
line on a starboard tack under all
sail, and stood about south, the wind
being about southwest. At 12:40 p.
m. the Columbia was running away
from the Constitution and was almost
a mile ahead of tne new boat, going
very fast. The Columbia turne 1 the
outer mark at 1:25:05 and the Consti
tution turned at 1:25:10.
At 2:10 p. m. the yachts have sailed
about half the distance oack to the
finish line. The Columbia still seems
in the lead with about half a mile to
the good.
The Columbia won, crossing the line
at 2:32:35. The Constitution crossed
at 2:33:18.
SURVEYING ROUTE BOTH
NORTH AND S0U1H
Great Northern Party Here Waiting
For Supplies.
The surveyors in charge of the out
fits who will leave in a few days to
survey the most feasible routes for
the new railroad in the northern part
of the country are busy getting sup
plies.
The majority of the supplies need
ed are coming through from St. Paul
by freight and were delayed by the
washout of the track in Dakota and
Montana. As is usually the case the
parties in charge have very little to
say in regard to their work or future
plans. There is no doubt, however,
that a thorough survey of the country
will be made and a route for the rail
road from Tobacco Plains to the main
line of the Great Northern decided
upon. There is no doubt but what
Kalispell will be the junction, how
ever, as this will be the junction for
the road from here to Jocko on the
Northern Pacific.
After completing their work north
it is understood that at least one of
the two surveying parties will make
examination of the southern route
across the reservation.
BOLT or LIGHTNING
KILLS TWELVE MEN
Who Were Fishing on a Lake Pier at
Chicago.
By Associated Press:
Chicago, 111., July 1.—Twelve men
were killed and a boy probably fatal
ly injured this afternoon by a single
bolt of the lightning. The victims
were Ashing at the foot of Montrose
boulevard. The fatal bolt struck the
pier where they were sëated and all
were thrown into the lake. Only the
boy has so far been recovered.
MONTANA BASEBALL
AS IT WAS PLAYED
Score of Various Games Throughout
the 8tate.
Butte, July 1.—Butte defated Liv
ingston. Dillon was victorious In
game with Pocatello. White Hall
beat Butte Critics and Missoula strad
died the Butte Montanas.
2
HEATED TERM
IS UNABATED
Along the Atlantic Slope. The
Hot Wave
CAUSES MANY DEATHS
By Associated Press:
New York, July 1.—The tempera
ture of New York at 7 a. m. was 82
egrees, Boston 82; Philadelphia 86,
Washington 86, Chicago 82, Minneapo
lis 70, Cincinnati 82, St. Louis 82.
The hot weather continued today.
Seven deaths from heat are reported
in the city and six in Brooklyn.
Chicago, 111., July 1.—At 9 o'clock
this morning the thermometer show
ed 89. The humidity intensified tne
suffering, the air showing 85 per cent
of moisture.
Washington, July 1.—The hot wave
shows no signs of breaking.
Pittsburg, July 1.—Last night was
one of the hottest in years.
Cleveland, Ohio, July 1.—There is
no abatement in the heat today.
Milwaukee, Wis., July l.-rToday the
thermometer registered 92 with a hot
breeze.
to
of
at
the
all
the
Liv
Hall
New York and Brooklyn. Milwaukee
Was the Hottest Place of the
Bunch Today.
Baltimore, July 1.—This city is the
hottest place in the United States. At
2 p. m. thç thermometer indicated 101
degrees. No deaths are known to
have occurred from heat.
St. Louis, July 1.—Intense heat con
tinues unabated. Yesterday there
were eight deaths and twelve prostra
tions, up to noon there has been re
ported four deaths from heat pros
trations today.
Philadelphia, July 1.—Seven deaths
today from heat. There have been
twenty prostrations.
Washington, July 1.—At 2 o'clock
this afternoon, the official tempera
ture was 100 egrees. Twelve prostra
tions are reported.
ADD CHICAGO
At 12:30 p. m. suffering from in
tense heat was alleviated by a sudden
drop in temperature to 71, and by a
heavy fall of rain. Up to noon no
prostrations were reported.
EXPORT COTTON.
The Remarkable Export of Raw Cot
ton From Seattle.
The Great Northern steamer Kin
shiu Maru, which sailed from Seattle
Monday, had in her hold 4,200 bales of
cotton consigned to Japanese mills
every bale weighing 500 pounds. Last
month's steamer took out 4,400 bales
This makes a total, roughly speaking,
of 20,000 bales for the year, taken to
Japan by the Great Northern boats
alone. The Northern Pacific steam
ers have taken out as much more and
the Canadian Pacific and O. R. & N.
have been entrusted with probably
10,000 bales each. The grand total
therefore of steamers leaving from
north coast points is in the neighbor
hood of 60,000 bales, or 30,000,000
pounds of raw cotton, which repre
sents a respectable profit for the north
coast railroads.
Large as these shipments may seem
they are insignificant compared with
the consignments imported by the
Japanese two years ago, when special
boats were required to transport the
enormous orders for cotton sent to
this country from the Powery king
dom. Railroads reaped an immense
profit at that time, but the sagacious
Japs did not, as was thought, over
load themselves with cotton. The fol
lowing season saw a big rise in the
prices of cotton and the Japanese
were then in a position to export raw
cotton to Great Britain at greater
profit than they could the finished
product. Large sales of American cot
ton went to English mills from this
source, and still the Japanese mills
had plenty of cotton for their own
use. Now tneir purchases are again
approaching the normal volume.
CASES SET FOR TRIAL.
The following cases were set for
trial on Monday, July 8, by the dis
trict court this morning:
Karl Augustus Lehman, rape; Jas
Smith, forgery; Brig Smith, obstruct
ing county road; Josh Bell, assault in
first degree. The court heard a few
unimportant civil cases and adjourn
ed until 10 o'clock tomorrow morn
ing.
BON WORKEBS
OUT ONSTRIKE
Over Thirty-Five Thousand
Men Are Included
WORKS AT PITTSBURG
Have Closed Down Pending the Result of
the Amalgamated Association's
. Walk Out.
By Associated Press:
Pittsburg, Pa., July 1.—As a result
of the refusal of representatives of
the American Sheet Steel company
and the American Steel Hoop company
to sign the workers new schedule, cir
culars were sent out from the Na
tional headquarters of the Amalga
mated association of iron and steel
and tin workers, declaring a strike at
all plants of tue two combines. At the
outset over 35,000 men are involved.
TWO LADIES HURT
IN A RUNAWAY
a
to
to
Rib of One and Hip of Another
Broken.
Sheridan, Mont, July 1.—Mrs. Chas,
Glasser and Miss Kittle Drummond
sustained serious injuries touay in a
runaway, the former having a rib frac
tured and the latter her hip broken.
SIGN TAFT'S COMMISSION
AS GOVERNOR GENERAL
The President Officially Recognizes
'.the Hew Appointment.
By Associated Press:
Washington, July 1.—The president
today signed the commission of Wil
liam H. Taft of Ohio, as civil gover
nor of the Philippine Islands.
BOOKKEEPER ARRES1ED
FOR ALLEGED DEFALCATION
A Butte Jeweler it Held up For Court
Investigation.
Butte, July 1.—Until recently Clias.
R. Greene was bookkeeper for J. H.
Leyson, a jeweler of North Main
street. Greene u few weeks ago form
ed a partnership in the jewelry busi
ness with H. S. Tuttle. Today Greene
was arrested on a warant sworn out
by Leyson, charging him with short
age in his accounts. The new firm, it
is understood, was to have been back
ed by W. A. Clark, Jr. Greene insists
Leyson was actuated by spite and
that the charge is without founda
tion. Greene gave bonds and his ex
amination will be held in a day or two,
CHINESE AGAIN IN CHARGE.
By Associated Press:
Pekin, July 1.—All parts of Pekin
are occupied by the British for police
purposes, were turned over today to
the Chinese authorities.
for
in
few
FILED FOR RECORD.
Frank Smith to Wm. Johnson, lot
10, block 173; consideration $400.
Andrew N. Smith to Finley S. Win
nett, southeast quarter of section 8,
township 30 north of range 21 west;
consideration $4,000.
Michael A. Schwahan et al, to John
J. Stinger, mining deed.
Charles Johnson to B. Cusick, south
west quarter of section 22, township 27
north of range 25 west; considera
tion $400.
Esther Jetty to Fred Langerman
east half of the southwest quarter,
the southeast quarter of the north
west quarter section 22, and the north
east quarter of the northwest quar
ter of section 21, township 27, north
of range 20 west; consideration $1
and other valuable considerations.
Marcus D. Baldwin et ux to William
D. Hill, one-half of lot 18, block 56,
Kalispell; consideration $1,750.
William D. Hill to the Conrad Na
tional Bank, lot 18, block *56, Kalis
pell; consideration $3,258.
WHEAT QUOTATIONS.
By Associated Press:
Chicago, July 1.—September wheat,
per bu., 65 3-4c.
San Francisco, Cal., July 1.—Cash
wheat, per cwt, 95c.
of
of
at
WIS SHOT AT
FROM AMBUSH
3ut this Hunter Was Not
Scared Out so He
RETURNED THE FIRE
But His Assailant Escaped Uninjured.
Hunter Had $550 of Wolf Bounty
Money on Him.
a
H.
out
it
and
ex
to
Glendive, July 1.—Last night 30
miles north of here, William Newton
of.Aideland, while returning home in
company with a man named Walker,
was shot at from ambush by high
waymen. The bullet grazed Newton's
cheek and passed through Walker's
coat sieve. Newton returned the fire
with a rifle and the bandit made his
retreat apparently unhurt. Newton
had just recived $550 bounty on wolf
and coyote hides, and it is supposed
that the highwayman was cognizant
of this fact and sought to murder him
for his money.
BUTTE'S SAUCER TRACK
FOR BICYCLE EXPERTS
Raoes Were Opened Yesterday and
Big Crowd Attends.
Butte, July 1.—The bicycle races at
Butte were formally inaugurated last
night at the new Board Saucer ampi
theater which will seat more than
4,000 people. Much enthusiasm was
evinced among whelmen and good
races are being conteste!.
A VIRGINIA NEGRO
LYNCHED BY A MOB
Taken From the Jail at Lawrenceville
Yesterday.
By Associated Press:
Richinond, Va., July 1.—A negro
who attempted criminal assault on a
Brunswick county woman a few days
ago, was taken from the jail at Law
renceville Sunday night by a mob and
lynched.
FIRE AT HOOSIAC TUNNEL PIER.
By Associated Press:
Boston, July 1.—Fire today destroy
ed the pier at Hoosiac tunnel dock,
with a large quantity of merchandise.
Six frieght cars were consumed. The
loss is $200.000.
IT 18 AN UNKNOWN LAND.
lot
Win
8,
27
quar
$1
56,
Na
Will Prospect Mysterious Country to
8outh of Coeur O'Alenee.
A Wallace, Idaho, special says some
of the old prospectors of the Coeur
d'Alenes plan to make a trip through
the country south of here, beyond the
St. Joe river. There is a region nearly
40 miles square on which, so far as
known, the foot of white man has
never trod.
To the north lie the Wardner and
Canyon creek lead mines; to the east
are the old placer camps on the upper
waters of the St. Joe; to the south is
Oro Fino; to the west lie the newly
discovered mines of Santa and the
famous old Hoodoo diggings.
For 40 years men have been going
by on every side of it, but no man has
ventured into its depths. From the
summit of Stevens peak a birdseye
view of the whole tract may be se
cured, but there is little in the sight
to tempt any save a prospector. The
main part of the tract is one mountain
range after another, all covered with
dense timber. The uniformity of the
green foliage indicates underbrush.
Most of the region is high, ranging
from 4,000 to 6,000 feet above the
,sea level, where winter comes early
and stays long. On a few of the
higher peaks the ribs of the mountain
have been broken off by the elements,
forming acres of slide rock, hut ex
cept for these there is the continuous
green of the forest and its accompany
ing underbrush. The latter forms the
principal obstacle to the prospector,
and he might pass a score of times
within a rod of great outcroppings of
rock without seeing them.
With the present lack of transpor
tation nothing but placer or free gold
quarts would possess any value, but
with mines of that character on all
Bides it is argued that there is almost
a certainty that some of them will be
found there.
Y0UN6 MAN
NAB THE NERVE
Was Pinned Down by Falling
Ridge Pole
DEBRIS WAS ALL AFIRE
And He Was in the Act of Unjointing Leg
to Escape Incineration When
Rain Came.
Glendive, Mont., July 1.—A young
man named Farris was brought to this
city Friday with a broken leg, which
was amputated today. Farris was a
sheep herder for William Norton of
Sidney, and in a lonely region occii
pie a cabin that was blown down iu
the storm and set afire by an upset
ting stove. Farris was pinned by a
ridge pole in the burning debris and
as it was impossible to extricate him
self, he was in the act of disjointing
his own leg with a knife when the
timely rain extinguished the fire.
Farris was discovered almost dead
after 18 hours of terrible suffering and
brought to Glendive, where an opera
tion was performed today.
And
By
by
kin
PEKIN WILL REMAIN THE
CAPI1AL OF CHINA
No Credence Given Report That Court
Will Remove.
By Associated Press:
Berlin, July 1.—Nothing is known in
German official circles regarding the
news from Shanghai that Kai Fong
Fu, in the province of Ho Nan, is to
become the Chinese capital. The lat
est report received here reiterates the
statement that it is the court's inten
tion to return to Pekin.
It
a
PITCHFORK PIERCED HIS HEAD.
By Associated Press:
Hillsboro, Ore., July 1.—Francis Da
vis, 15 years ol, fell from a load of
hay this morning and was instantly
killed by a pitchfork piercing his head.
is
of
but
all
be
THE SALE OF TIMBER.
That on Homestead Entries May be
Disposed of.
The register and receiver of the
Missoula United States land office
has received from Commissioner Bin
ger Hermann, of the general land offi
ce at Washington, a decision in the
case of a contest of the United States
vs. W. A. Grow, involving a homestead
entry of 160 acres in the upper Bitter
Rott valley, in which the decision of
the local office holding that Grow's
entry was correct is affirmed.
The decision covers the points of
the case decided some few days ago
similarly, and as the points of selling
timber from homestead claims is in
volved, and the ruling is here made,
the text of the commissioner's opin
ion is here given:
"May 22nd, 1895, William A. Grow,
made homestead entry No. 1365 for
the south half northeast quarter
north half southeast quarter, section
23, township 4 north of range 31 west.
"Commutation proof was made in
support thereof April 18th, 1898, and
on April 21st, 1898, cash certificate
No. 967 issued.
"By letter 'P' of November 9th,
1898, said entry was held for cancel
lation upon the report of Special
Agent Orner, charging that he made a
personal examination of the land Oc
tober 6th, 1898, and found it to be
timber land, wholly unfit for cultiva
tion; that the timber was cut and re
moved, and sold by the entryman in
1896 and 1897, to the Bitter Root De
velopment company; that there has
been no attempt at cultivation; that
the improvements consist of a log
cabin 8x10 feet, stable 10x12 feet, and
couple of shacks or sheds; that
claimant has never maintained an ac
tual bona fide residence on said tract;
that the entry was not made for a
home, but for speculation in the tim
ber, and is now abandoned.
"Upon the application of the claim
ant a hearing was ordered in the case
by letter "P" of March 7th, 1899, and
the same was duly had, at which both
parties appeared and submitted evi
dence.
"January 23rd 1901, you rendered
your decision, in which you recom
mended that both the original and cash
entry be allowed to remain intact.
"From careful examination of the
HOLDINB UP A
CHINA BROKER
Americans in the Country
Near Pekin, China
HOLD UP A PAWNSHOP
And Secure All the Ready Money as Well
as Eive Girt Loads of the
Plunder.
By Associated Prosa:
Pekin, July 1.—Five men, calling
themselves Americans, were captured
by Chinese troops, fifty miles from Pe
kin and were today turned over to
Major Robertson, commander of the
United States legation guard here. The
men demanded 50,000 taels from the
keper of a pawnshop and got 500.
They filled hve carts with plunder and
then began shooting.
HIGH SCHOOL BONDS RE
JECTED IN CHICAGO
The Beaverhead County Bonds Not
Considered Good Security.
Dillon, Mont., July 1.—The recent
purchase of $30,000 of high school
bonds of Beaverhead county by a
Chicago firm of brokers has been re
pudiated by the latter on the ground
that the election authorizing the is
sue was Illegal owing to the fact that
some districts refrained from voting.
It is thought the matter will be ad
justed, but not in time to erect a
building as first expected.
in
a
in
a
the
OREGON MURDERER TO
SERVE FIFTEEN YEARS
Supreme Court Sustains the Lower
Court on Appeal.
By Associated Press:
Portland, Ore., July 1.—A special
to the Evening Telegram from Salem,
says the supreme court has sustained
the judgment of the lower court in the
case of Frank Daniel, convicted of the
murder of Claire Fitch, in Portland, in
July, 1899. McDaniel was sentenced
to 15 years in the penitentiary.
KYLE MAY NOT RECOVER.
By Associated Press:
Aberdeen, S. D., July 1.— U. S.
Senator Kyle suffered a relapse to
day. It is believed he cannot recover.
BROUGHT DOWN A MILLION.
By Associated Press:
Seattle, Wash., July 1.—The steam
ship Victorian arrived this morning
with seventy-five Dawsonites and be
tween $800,000 and $1,000,000 in gold.
testimony I find that claimant made
settlement on said land in 1895 and
has resided thereon continuously ex
cept at short intervals, until the time
of making said proof; that he placed
improvements thereon during said
time, consisting of a log house 16x36
feet and a log barn of the same size;
that he dug a drainage ditch and drain
ed about twenty acres of meadow
land that was not timbered; that he
got out posts and fencing and cleared
off brush from the meadow to the ex
tent of about one acre, and that his
improvements are of the value of $300.
"Much of the evidence introduced
relates to the cutting of timber on
said tract, which it seems was sold
to the Anaconda Copper Mining com
pany; but for the purposes of this
case, it does not appear necessary to
decide whether the timber was cut
primarily for the purpose of clearing
the land for cultivation or for specu
lation. If cut for speculation, the très
pasers are liable for prosecution,
and it appears that proceedings have
been already commenced for trespass
on this and other lands in this vicini
ty, but the unlawful cutting of timber
on a homestead is not sufficient in
the absence of other evidence of bad
faith to warrant the cancellation of
the entry.
"In view of the foregoing , I am
of the opinion that your decision on
said entry is correct.
"Said decision is accordingly affirm
ed and the proceedings dismissed.
So note on your records and advise
claimant of this action.'*

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