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The Kevin courier. [volume] (Kevin, Mont.) 1922-1922, August 02, 1922, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053340/1922-08-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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By JOHN DICKINSON SHERMAN
HO ARE tiie twelve greatest living
American women? This embarrassing
question is asked of the National
League of Women Voters by Senorita
Graciela Mandujano of Chile. The
Chilean woman was a delegate to the
Pan-American Conference of Women
recently held at Baltimore in connec
tion with a convention of the Na
tional League of Women Voters. She
is a writer and she wants to write
up the twelve for home publications.
The question is indeed embarrassing.
There is, for one thing, an embarrass
ment of riches. If there were only twelve women
in the United States worthy of being named in
answer to the question, all would be well. But
the United States has so many great women—to
say nothing of the famous ones !
It's also embarrassing to the National League
of Women Voters, for the reason that to answer
it the league must perforce name at least one
of its own members.
And it's embarrassing to anyone asked to draw
up a list—there are so many things to be consid
ered. For example, from one viewpoint one would
natqrally name the "First Lady of the Land"—
Mrs. Warren G. Harding—and from another Mary
Plckford or Mary Garden or Geraldine Farrar
Mary Roberts Rinehart or Ida M. Tarbell or Edith
Wharton.
Again, one might name Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont
or Alice Paul of the National Woman's party
Mrs. Maud Wood Park of the National League of
Women Voters; it depends upon whether one Is
is not militant in the matter of women suf
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or
or
or
frage.
' Again, if the list is to be made up of women
who have won distinction In their respective fields
Graciela
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Anyway,
dodged
Joint
tion.
and lias
men to
writing
question
an official
In the
some
In the
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eighty-three
as one
women.
The
the portraits
in addition
nil this
would not
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women.
eight
inasmuch
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and describe
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are :
1 _ yirs.
orary
president
suffragist.
2— Miss
social
3 — Miss
ican
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d—Miss
mander of
5—Miss
tiring
and author.
ß —Mrs.
dent of the
club woman
7 — rs .
chairman
gist and
8 — Miss
ber of
Oklahoma,
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Other
unofficial
Ida M.
C. Lathrop,
Robins,
Maude
singer;
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rett Hay,
Agnes
Geraldine
star; Mary
of endeavor there is the difficulty that some of
the names are not widely known. Such a list
would be scorned by people who think only of
popularity and notoriety and publicity.
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Mary Garrett Hay, who wrote out a
list upon the request of a newspaper,
put the situation very well.
"It is Impossible to do justice to
American women by selecting a paltry
twelve. Each person will select accord
ing to his mental bias. The women I
have chosen conform to a type that I
admire, the kind of woman who Is
highly educated, progressive, devoted
to the ideals of the new womanhood,
giving her life to serious work earnest
ly performed."
the National League of Women Voters
making answer. It asked the Women's
Congressional Committee to make the selec
body also dodged full responsibility
announced that it will ask five prominent
help in the selection. And at the present
that is ns near as Senorita Mandujano's
lias come to receiving what may be called
answer.
meantime scores of lists have made their
serious, some good, some bad,
indifferent.
lists the writer has seen the names of
women have been given, each selected
the twelve greatest living American
observing reader has doubtless noted that
given herewith number but eight,
to that of the woman who has started
discussion. The reason is this: the writer
dare to try to name the twelve greatest
He Is merely grouping the portraits of
who seem to he popular choices,
ns they appear in nearly all the lists.
course a work of supererogation to name
these eight women. However, they
Carrie Chapman Catt, New York, hon
president National League of Women Voters,
International Suffrage Alliance, woman
Jane Addams, Hull House, Chicago,
worker, author and lecturer.
Anne Tracey Morgan, New York, Amer
for Devastated France, philanthro
Evangeline Cory Booth, New York, com
the Salvation Army, religious worker.
M. Carey Thomas, Bryn Mawr, Pa., re
president of Bryn Mawr college, educator
Thomas G. Winter, Minneapolis, presi
General Federation of Women's clubs,
and writer.
Harriet Taylor Upton, Warren. O., vice
Republican National Committee, suffra
author.
Alice Mary Robertson, Muskogee, mem
national house of representatives from
Indian educator.
names that frequently appear in the many
lists are these: Edith Wharton, novelist:
Tarbell, author; Cecilia Beaux, artist; Julia
worker for children; Mrs. Raymond
sociologist; Helen Keller. leader of blind:
Adams.
Schumann-Heink, singer; Mary c
•lub woman; Julia Marlowe.
actress; Mme. Louise
Monier
nr
actress
singer
Repplier, essayist; Mary Garden.
Farrar, singer; Mary Plckford, scree;
Roberts Rinehart, novelist.
ENGINE TEASERS
HAVE POOR CARS
Certain Type of Drivers Cannot
Resist Temptation to Fool
With Carburetor.
GRIND VALVES WHEN NEEDED
Compound Must Be Carefully Wiped
Out at Finish, Otherwise Cylinder
Walls Will Be Worn Out
Plug Up Openings.
There is a certain type of motorcar
driver who. whenever the
doesn't perform properly, immediately
begins to adjust tlie carburetor. An
other type flies a dollar's worth
metal from the interrupter points. And
still another wants to grind the valves
every other day.
These fellows are
and no matter what 's wrong with the
car they think adjusting the carbure
tor, grinding the valves or filing the
Interrupter points will make the en
gine well again,
usually have a faulty
they persist in teasing it constantly.
Don't Grind Valves.
Don't grind your valves—until they
actually need it. Don't he forever
fussing with the engine. Don't Imag
ine that every little trouble has its
origin in the engine—it will get you
into trouble if you do.
I have seen cases where valves have
been ground so deep in the casting
that the seat was at the bottom of a
"well," and when the valve was
pushed open there was very little
space for the passage of exhaust
gases, writes B. W. Cooke, president
of the Coyne Trade and Engineering
school, in an exchange. A little more
grinding would have worn through the
castings and left no seat at all.
If the valve sets in the cylinder
care should be taken to plug up all
openings leading to the cylinder so
that no grinding compound may work
inside. Also, the grinding compound
must be carefully wiped out at the fin
ish—otherwise it will keep on grind
ing and wear out the cylinder walls.
It is well to check up the push rod
clearance before and after valve
grinding; before, because there may
not be enough clearance to allow the
valve to seat, thus causing the leak
which appears to make grinding nec
essary—afterward, because there may
be a slight lowering of the valve, mak
ing adjustment necessary.
Grinding Is Harmful.
engine
engine teasers
Consequently they
car—because
Before grinding make sure that the
valve needs it and do not grind any
more than is necessary. After you
liave ground enougli to give a tight
seat ail further effort expended is
waste.
In addition, it is harmfül to
the engine.
Therefore grind your valves only
when they need it, hut do not grind
theni on general principles or longer
than to make a perfect seat. And
don't be an engine teaser.
-f
f ...
Accidents Will Happen
Administer first aid to the in- ?
Jured. t
Equip the car with a small I
case of first-aid materials.
Get the names and addresses i
of all who actually saw the acci- ?
dent. i
If the car is covered by in- J
surance, notify the agent as i
soon as possible. ;
Clear the road so that traffic, j
if it is restricted or blocked, can I
be resumed.
The nearest automobile will I
volunteer to rush the injured one ?
to the nearby hospital or phy- .
sician's office. "
L
4
GIRLS LEARN AUTO-MECHANIC TRADE
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How would you like to nave your car repaired by a member of the fair
sex? That is just what is being done in Milwaukee. Girls from many sec
tions of the city are learning the auto-raeclianic trade, so it will not he long
before your bus will be cared for by woman herself.
The picture shows a Milwaukee young lady hard at work on the bottom
/'•
ot a car.
!|
You Auto Know
That some cars have a ten
dency to leak oil from the right
hand wheel housing, even when
no excess of lubricant Is ap
parent anywhere else. This Is
due to the fact that the right
side of the car is usually at a
lower level than the left, espe
cially when driving along coun
try roads where macadam is de
signed to shed water into the
ditches on either side. As a re
sult of this leakage, the right
hand brake band is often cov
ered with a thin film of oil which
prevents it from functioning
properly.
A simple remedy for this is to
wrap a long strip of thin felt
around the shaft, starting from
the wheel end and working In a
direction opposite to the forward
motion of the wheel, covering
the axle for a distance of about
eight inches. The felt should
then he fastened to the shaft
with shellac and held in place
by cord, tied around it several
times. When the shaft is turned,
the effect of this is to force the
oil back toward the differential
and away from the brakes.
(Copyright, 1923, by The Wheeler
Syndicate. Inc.)
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PLAN TO PREVENT SKIDDING
Readjustment of Radius or Torque
Rods Will Remedy Defect, Sel
dom Suspected.
When an automobile skids with the
least cause and sometimes apparently
without cause, the radius rods or
torque tubes which hold the rear axle
perpendicular to the center of the car
are the reason. A bend or incorrect
adjustment of one of these rods throws
the center of the axle around and the
wheels do not track, but tend to roil
^RADIUS RODS'
Y °feSl.TS~^S
Incorrect Adjustment of the Torque
Rods Will Cause Skidding and
Should Be Remedied.
The rear
in an Independent course,
end is naturally inclined La follow the
wheels and skidding is the result.
Tills is one of the seldom suspected
causes of skidding and the remedy is
to take accurate measurements from
the yoke-bolts at each side of the front
axle to the rear axle and adjust or
straighten the rods as required until
the measurements are exactly alike.—
G. A. Luers in Popular Science Month
iy
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BUS
>
Oil the springs.

4c
Adjust the carburetor.
Take an inventory of the toolbox
and accessories.
* * *
Flush out the radiator and clean
cooling system thoroughly.
•E
Zinc oxide or lampblack is used in
tires to toughen the tread.
«
It is bad for the tires to force them
to carry more weight than they are
intended to hear.
4c 4c 4c
The best and most reliable brakes
are in the motorist's brain and his
hands on the wheel.
♦ * *
A good compound for use on termi
nals, connecting bars and other bat
tery fixings is made by melting small
pieces of sealing wax in alcohol.

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