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Title:
Western news and the Libby times. [volume] : (Libby, Mont.) 1920-1933
Alternative Titles:
  • Western news
Place of publication:
Libby, Mont.
Geographic coverage:
  • Libby, Lincoln, Montana  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
Publisher:
Western Montana Pub. Co.
Dates of publication:
1920-1933
Description:
  • Vol. 19, no. 51 (June 11, 1920)-v. 33, no. 1 (June 8, 1933).
Frequency:
Weekly
Language:
  • English
LCCN:
sn 85053376
OCLC:
12922085
Preceding Titles:
Succeeding Titles:
Holdings:
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Western news and the Libby times. [volume] January 3, 1929 , Image 1

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The Western news

The Western News was first published on July 17, 1902, in Libby, Montana. The paper was established by Frank M. Leonard and Leo H. Faust. In 1909, E.A. Southwick, the former publisher of The Whitefish Pilot, bought a half interest in the News. He and Faust continued together until Faust sold out to Southwick in 1912. Southwick sold the News to journalist and politician Col. J.M. Kennedy in 1913. He hired John P. Kelly to edit the paper. On March 18, 1915, the paper announced that "the Western News becomes an eight-page, home-print newspaper. Every line of type appearing in this issue has been set in our plant and deals with local conditions." Over the next few years, C.A. Griffin and James E. Stevens would hold the position of editor. In September 1916, Griffin and partner Irwine purchased the News from Kennedy. The masthead read "Western Montana Publishing Company" and listed Griffin as both manager and editor. Hand-set type was standard until 1917, when Griffin brought the first Linotype machine to Libby. In June of 1920, the News merged with J.T. Farris's The Libby Times. As a result, the paper's title changed to Western News and Libby Times. Charles D. Rowe bought controlling interest in the Western Montana Publishing Co. in 1923.

Contents in the 1940s included news for Libby, Eureka, and Troy, as well as a humor column and "With Our Men in the Service," which provided updates on locals in the service. The local high school published its own column as a pseudo-paper, "The Tamarack" in which student journalists covered topics ranging from tourism in Glacier National Park to logging, and mining.

Littell succeeded Rowe, and in 1960, Paul E. Verdon succeeded Littell. Verdon owned the News until Bill King purchased it. The Cabinet Publishing Company purchased the paper in 1981.

Provided by: Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT