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The daily enterprise. [volume] (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, August 06, 1883, Image 4

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TELEGRAPHIC NOTES.
Smallpox and yellow fever are raging
on the coast of Guatemala.
The number of deaths from
Egypt, Wednesday, was 887.
cholera in
Gen. Ord's body w ill be kept in Havana
until cold weather, when it will be sent
north.
Kelly, Woodrick & Co., merchants of
London, England, have failed. Liabilities,
£00,000.
Another shock of earthquake was felt
on the island of Ischia last Wednesday
evening.
Germany is making preparations to
properly observe the 400th birthday of
Martin Luther.
" It is now claimed that O'Donnell, the
murderer of Carey, is an American citi
zen and a native of Ohio.
A big syndicate has leased over 3,000,
000 acres of grazing land from the Chey
ennes and Arapahoes for $100.000 a year.
The operators on the Mexican National
railroad struck yesterday. They demand
an increase of $30 per month. Trains are
interruped.
A movement is on foot in London for
the erection of a memorial to Capt. Webb,
and raising a fund for the assistance of
his family.
Mr. W. N. Ackerman has formally re
signed the presidency of the Illinois Cen
tral railroad, giving as a reason that he
needs rest after 31 years of service for
that corporation.
At a meeting of the Northwestern
Traffic Association yesterday in Chicago
the Northern Pacific road was granted the
same proportion on through freight from
Chicago, Milwauke and St. Louis to Port
land, Ore., as the Union Pacific now re
ceives on freight from Council Bluffs to
8 m Francico.
J. Y. Platto has commenced proceed
ings in an action for damages against the
Western Union Telegraph Company before
Justiee Connelly in Milwaukee. This
action is based upon a delay in delivering
a dispatch, whereby tue plaintiff was
greatly inconvenienced and put to finan
cial loss. The telegram, it seems, was'
filed during the afternoon of the 20th
uit., in Waukeaha, but was not delivered
ii Milwaukee until the evening of the
following day.
Kansas City, No.. Aug. 4. —Bob Ford,
who killed Jesse James, was arreeted in
this city to-day. It is not known what
prompted the arrest at tliis particular time,
or why hitherto it has been deferred, al
though it is supposed the authorities have
been gathering evidedce- Ford was at
the pojjice station chatting with an officer
when the arrest was made. He offered no
resistance, but seemed much disturbed.
He was relieved of a brace of heavy re
voltrers and conducted to jail, where he
now awaits arraignment.
The Colored Man and the Hog*
A writer in a Northern magazine
wants to know why the negro con-
stantly figures before the courts of the
South. This question is very easily
answered. We have been studying the
colored gentleman's legal, or rather
illegal, prominence for some time, anc
ve have an abiding faith in the belie: :
that the leading thinkers of the South
will agree with us when we affir m that
Ute hog, the unregenerated Unitec
States hog, is the cause. Placed on
prairie, w ithout any surroundings what-
ever, the average colored gentleman
nrght prove to be an honest citizen, bul;
w lien he lives in a community where
hogs abound, there is no chance for him
but to conduct his business on the silent
a d under-current plan. From the re-
motest inception of slavery in America
< - vn to the last overflow, the negro
. d the hog have been linked in a rela-
ship unknown to the Hottentot.
- be grunt of the hog to him ha« ever
1 *en a sound as familiar as the lament
the missionary is to the Eijilslander.
T iis is not the fault of the colored
tleman. In no respect can you load
• blame on him. He was doing
• * "»mess in Africa, at an obscure stand,
v ii ;u the white man transported him
f America and introduced him to
i : '■ hog and assisted him in cultivat
! -• an appetite for the flesh of the
•' "Ual despised by the lineal descend
' i Moses. He did not claim rela
bip with the hog until the white
the pioneer of earthly mischief,
v à a lasting acquaintance. The
:;ucy, carelessly begun, soon ripened
a passion. The colored gentleman
t:'d upbn associating with the hog.
it is impossible to effect a separa
r ' . The hog is willing, but his legs
weak. The law is willing, but the
0 is not. He adheres to the cus
f his fathers. His father said let
hog, and immediately there was
No revision that the law may
■ can affect this ancient delaration.
1 aw may say thon shalt not steal
. - ; !or beat false witness against the
, but the action of tradition
g.-mme de ah oat."
No, sir, the colored gentleman cannot
; an undoubted Christian so long as th e
g inhabits the land. He may strug
'h ii ud. pray a great deal, but wnen the
. m the church is extinguished, and
% sisters with tearful eyes go home,
1 colored gentleman looks around for
i 'b- ce whore ho can have undisturbed
Nation with the swine. We don't
q m to assert that all or even one-third
J the oolored gentlemen do but
■ mean that the old-time representa-
r is the man who wü] not forego the
- ^ure .—Arkansaw Traveler.
-
i
says,
to
do
is
ed
bit,
He
the
sent
it
ife
ail
of
etc.
a
Various Ways In Which to Utilize Stale
Bread.
There are so many w r ays to utilize
stale bread that it seems a wonder so
":ch is wasted in many households.
We see it thrown into garbage pails or
U ft to mold by many an economical
servant, who would gladly use it if she
only "knew what to do with it."
it m kes delicious griddle cakes
when soaked soft in cold water. Three
small slices, with water enough to cover
them, should be sufficient, when the
•]k and flour are added, to make near
ly two quarts of batter. Borne cooks
- > of'-r to put in one egg, while others
i ke them fully as well without. When
t: e bread & soaked soft make fine bat
tev with a spoon, add the milk and suffi
cient flour to stiffen enough so the cakes
can be easily turned. If sour milk is
used add to the batter one even tea
spoon of cream tartar, dissolved in a
little water, and one even teaspoon of
soda. This is a good plan to follow in
all uses of sour milk, as it seldom con
tains enough acid to entirely counteract
the soda. Of course, when only a small
quantity of sour milk is used twice as
much cream tartar as soda should be
taken, for when the milk is entirely
sweet the proportions are three even
teaspoons of cream tartar to one of soda.
French toast is always a favorite dish
with children and most grown people,
and can be made of thin slices cut from
a stale loaf and moistened in milk and
egg—two eggs to a pint of milk—and
then fried on a griddle with a mixture
of butter and lard or butter and beef
drippings. It is eaten with sugar or
sirup like griddle cakes.
All may not know that pieces of bread
which are not too hard can be made
into a resemblance to turkey dressing.
Cut your bread into dice, and if yoti
have a quantity of gravy, from which
fat can be taken, left from any kind of
roast (though a piece of butter will do
as w ell), thoroughly grease the bottom
of a spider ; put in the bread, with some
little chunks of butter and plenty of
seasoning, then pour enough boiling
water on it to moisten it; cover tightly,
and in a moment it will steam through
and you can stir it, and either brown a
little or have it moist like dressing. It
should be eaten with gravy over it, and
is a good substitute for potatoes.
The little dry, hard pieces and crusts
widen always accumulate can be put. on
a pie tin in an oven that is just hot
enough to dry and make them a light
brown, then roll them fine and put away
to use in making coquettes, frying fish,
etc. We have recently learned that
these slightly browned crumlis make
excellent griddle cakes, with the ad
dition of one egg and a handful of flour
and milk to make a batter; but, as we
iiuve never tasted them, we can only
recommend it as worthy of trial.— Mrs.
G. Herbert , in Floral Cabinet.
Animals Acquiring Human Speech.
A writer in the Journal of Science
deals with the interesting subject of
the attempts of certain of the lower
animals to acquire human speech. At
the outset the observer is struck by the
curious fact that the most-successful
attempts of this nature have been
made, not by the animals that are
usually held to rank nearest to humani
ty, but by certain birds. M. A. Roujon
tells of a dog that can pronounce the
w ords ma maman. Considering the in
telligence of dogs, it is perhaps a mat
ter of surprise that such stories are not
commoner. It has been suggested that
the cause may be in the difference in
structure of the vocal organs. At all
events, the lower mammalia as a rule
do not learn human speech. It is the
parrot and not the monkey that learns
to talk. This has struck the observant
negro, who is said to have a theory than
the monkey can speak but will not do
so, lest he should be made to work. L:
the monkeys had arrived at this gener
alization, they would soon find that even
the mutes must do something in the
complex organization of civilized life
It is clear, however, that in addition
to the possession of certain physiologi
cal and mental characteristics an animal
must be in close contact with man be
fore he can be expected to become fa
miliar with his speech. It is evident
that the animals that would appear
most promising for such an experiment
are not available for the purpose. They
do not increase in captivity, and hence
the hereditary influences of selective
development carried on for generations
is entirely absent. It is gravely doubt
ed by some whether the birds that imi
tate the speech of man have any per
ception whatever of the meaning of the
words they use. Do they employ their
phrases with definite purpose or inten
tion, or do they merely reproduce what
they hear, as a boy may imitate the
quack of a duck or the grunt of a pig?
The writer of the article mentioned re
cites the case of a parrot which always
preferred the petition, "Give Polly a
bit, if yon please," when she saw' that
food was being prepared, but did not
offer that observation at any other time.
He also mentioned a magpie at Stow
market that knew and used with accu
racy the names of several members of
the family.
Op the considerable number of boys
sent to Virginia by the Cnildren's Aid
Society of New York, comparatively few,
it seems, have turned out well. Many
lave run away to take np the vagrant
ife of the cities ; some have got into
ail ; others were discharged by their
employers; some few adapted them
selves to the rather harsh requirements
of farm life, and have attained good po
sitions as overseers, superintendents,
etc.
Th* monument at Yorktown, Va., is
a be built of Maine granite, by a
Maine company» and to cost $66,027.
Montana* Lumber
OFFICERS :
W. C. Edwards, Prost., St. Paul, Minn.
J. R. Hathaway, Vice-Prcst., Billings.
C. A. Wustum, Sec. and Treas., Billings.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
! !
P. FLANNERY, Prop.
DEALER in
The finest stock of Liqnors and
the West. Old Kentucky
^{TTight nicely furnished rooms to
the day or week. Terms reasonabel.
let b
END OF 3 EAILB0AD DIVISIONS.
Railroad Company are building Shops
and Round Houses.
Good Bituminous Coal Mines west of
the town.
Clark's Fork's Mines reached from Liv
ingston.
National Park entered from Livingston.
For plats and information of lots in the
Original Townsite and adjacent to the
Depot, apply to
GENERAL LAND AGENT N.P.R. R.CO.
St. Paul, Minn.,
NICKEUS, WILBUR & NICHOLS,
Jamestown, Dakota, or
FRANK BUSH,
Agent Land Dept. N. P. R. R. Co.,
Livsngston, Montana.
L. Taylor, Gen'l Townsite Agent.
EARLEY & HOLMES,
Livery, Feed and Sale Stables.
Full rigs or saddle horses to let, and care
ful drivers furnished if desired.
BUY AND SELL E OR SES
They are prepared to carry travelers into
the Park or to any other point, ahead of all
competitors.
dT* Stables on Clark street, Livingston
LATH,
SHINGLES,
MOULDINGS,
SASH,
DOORS,
WINDOWS,
Building Paper,Etc.
YARDS AT
Billings and Livingston.
F. L. MINTIE,
Manager Livingston Yard.
HEALTH OFFICE!
DR. TIPPIE, Proprietor.
GARDINER, M. T.
Keeps the Choicest Wines, Liquors and
Cigars in the City. When Going
to tiie Park
GIVE HIM A CALL.
WINES, LIQUORS & CIGARS.
Milwaukee Keg Beer on Dranghî— 2 fc
ner Quart.
Ritters in
:y Whiskies selected
East, and warranted to suit the taste of the
best judges. The best place in the city to
en joy a quiet, social and refreshing beverage
Livingston, Montana,
At the Last Crossing of the
Yellowstone River,
AND
Junction of the National Park Branch R.
R. With Main Line of N. P. R. R.
D. M. REESE,
CONTRACTOR and builder
STORE FITTING A SPECIALTY.
Plans and Specifications given for any kind
of work.
Office at the Brunswick Hotel.
THE ST. ELMO
3 R.es ta/u.ra,nt
Is the best place in the city for a first-class
meal, served at all hours.
GARRETT & MURRAY,
- Proprietors.
Main Street, - - Livingston
Brunswick Hotel!
M. C. MURPHY, Propr.
This elegantly appointed and carefully managed hotel is now ready for t) lP re
sts. Travelers seeking neat and comfortable rooms and a well supplied table J;? r '
guests, j.. u . ^.v,. u......... ............
them at the BRUNSWIcf, Main street, Livingston, Montan«
When You Leave the Train at
Livingston, - - IMIontan,
ENQUIRE FOR THE FREE HACK TO TIIE
Merchants' Hotel
The table is supplied with everything the market afford?. p ar ] orf , f
accommodation of ladies, and the house throughout complete with everythin»* 1,
sary for the comfort of guests. * ft
CHOICE WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGAI
At the Bar in connection with the House.
Terms Reasonable. Park Street, Opposite the
WM. MITCHELL,Proprietor.
Park Street,
3 ? o c er ie
. ±*
erchant Tailor.
Suits made in the Latest Style, and a Sure Fit always guaranteed. Also de*l< r
Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats,
Livingston,
Montana
R. C. Griffith,
FOR
BLACKSMITHING.
He makes a specialty of horse shoeing. Wagon
shop in connection, and job work of all kinds
neatly and promptly done. Shop in rear of Wino
na House.____ _____
JAMES CARROLL,
Keeper of
Livery, Feed
AND
rscuLs SSiis/Tol©
Wagons, Horses and Ponies
For Sale.
Old Tow LIVINGSTON. Mt.
T. R. MAYO'S
Main Street, opposite Postoffice,
Are the MostElegantly Furnished
in the West.
None But Expert Workmen Emjloyed.
PITFinest stock of Barber supplies
in Montana. *
^ NDERSON & BORLAND,
BLACKSMITB.
Job wort and general black ?T^
promptly and to order. Wagon and i«®
m connection. ^ n^raMi
B street, Livings
E. GOUGHNO 1
proprietor or
Steam Saw and PlanW
AIbo, dealer in
all kin«** 1
EASTERN AND NATIVE
SASH, DOORS, BLIPS'
mouldings anf
BUILDING?^
Be careful to get his price*
elsewhere.
b W
^■Office an 3 v« Ae c
Livingston, Wtutun**.

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