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The daily enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, August 16, 1883, Image 1

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LIVINGSTON, MONTANA, THURSDAY MORNING, AUGUST 16, 1883.
Price, Ten Cents.
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JînaCET. . WM»
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^OF SffBSOBimOÏ.
Ui .. sis {«
................... 700
V"»»* 11 .................. & oo
.................
i ' i ' .'-TV SUBÖCBIB£»S:
îl,t * ' ..sortsperWe«k.
.............mi»,
y-t ......... ... Sets each.
........................
'•VrtKTWIS« BATE6:
..4^— ^
' " , _ ,, n „ iiuKTtio« <mly, fiftpen
^vvr tw'j or loore inseruoiw, ten
jj jltOTBBB 8 »
4a ESTATE DBALESS.
r àrnoc ÿôlieiW*»^ •
office on main etreet.
> CïfERLEÏ'S
PL estate agency,
for sale. Lois ia Eivwsidc
Addition
OSoe orer K. R. Dean k Co.'s.
jXlTH,
iTTOBSBT AT LAW
I y , u «{rwt.over Lawrenoe & Stuff'«.
[;£ L LeROV,
jTTOHNEYS
A T LAW.
: itfKÏZ AGENTS
and KOTARIES PUBLIC.
tu: hla Street, Smith's block.
II.ALTON, M. V ,
-flUJiGBOK
N. P. R. R- Co.
|SB ELDKR,
LAW AND REAL ESTATE,
llirtofTowrt and Farm property.
Main Street, livinxeien.
pAN à SCHULTZ,
»STRACT0R8 à BUILDERS,
. . •„ , ; t .
».dnaitWork aud Un«k>rtAking a specialty.
n promptly atteoded to.
ai specifications for all kinds of baiW
ic.;Maàc>o shcrtttotice. Give ue a call.
Main st-eot, Livlngetoo.
'MCI 0F THE
BELVIDERB.
and delicious drinks. Main Street.
H BCDLOXü, 1
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE,
Office on Main Street,
'fàoy, . . MONTANA.
nkof Livingston.
TBBIMS, MUND & CO.,
tôt,
fîIUL
Transacts a
BANKING
Montan«
BUSINESS.
V*/>n al! the principal cities of the
Uited Statt* and Europe.
'^Allowed os TIME DEPOSITS.
lr '^ r a L v • Cerrsepond
A. L. LOVE, Cashier.
Bat
LiVlMGSTON, MONT.
S«,L .
*«.•* 0,000 00
00,000 00
a aiä Soli on all parte of
to M
ft#» Made,
«^Äo. 0 ® protQp i tiy
AUïpb.. iv ,,4 : ■ ' i
Cûicago ;
DREW B. ALLEN.
FRANK P. ALLEN.
Real Estate Bulletin.
A fine building and lot in business
center. Building rented ao it will
pay 60 per cent, net on price.....$4,000 00
House and lot on Main street, well
located for business of any kind,
a bargain at the price............ 775 00
A well established and paying liquor
business for sale. Satisfactory
reasons given for selling. A rare
chance for some enterprising man.
Price with fixtures, stock, etc .... 250 00
Hotel for sale, doing a good business. 800 00
The most desirable business corner
in the fitv can be bo igbt, if pur
chased within ten days, tor....... 1,700 00
Residence bouse and lot......... 300 00
Lot 9, Block 94, good business prop
erty ..........'................... 350 00
Two business lots on 2d street.
These are the cheapest business
lota in the market. Each........ 300 00
An A No. 1 business corner; corner
remember, only............... . 1 000 00
Fine Park street business lots can
be bought from $600 to........... 1,500 00
A fair business corner, if sold this
month, can be bought for........ 350 00
First-class business lot. Consider
ing location, etc., it is one ot the
cheapest lots, if not the cheapest,
on the market to day. Price..... 650 00
A Park street lot that is rented for
$250 a year can be bought for..... 1,000 00
Good residence lots in all parts of
the city, cheap.
The above are a few of the Lots we have on our
register. All on good terms .
Before buying a Lot, Mine or Ranch , call on its and
see the largest, cheapest and best list of Real Estate in
the city.
.A. 3 L. LERNT BROTHERS
LISBON, Dakota.
. LIVINGSTON, Montana.
fclTLIVINGSTON OFFICE ON MAIN STREET. JgJj
C. W. Savage & Son,
DEALERS IN
3TAOJnin.ls3n.lra.gr Groods,
CLOTHING, HATS & CAPS,
Boots and Shoes, Etc.
Main Street, - Livingston, M. T.
BUY YOUR
FANCY GROCERIES
jAJT the
Peoples' Casla. GExocersr,
DONOVAN & Co. Main St.
POSTOFFICE
drug store,
Wright & Bartlett, Props.,
Dealers in
Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Oils, Books, Stationery, Ete.
Prescriptions carefully compounded day and night. Main street, Livingston.
E. YOUNG, M. D-, will be found at the P. O. Drug Store night and day.
IS
BED.
MADE
LIKE,
TICLB
YOUR HÔMES SHOULD ALSO BE
TO LOOK PLEASANT AND HOME
AND WHEN IN NEED OF ANY AK
IN THE FURNITURE, CROCKERY,
I, CALL ON
t V N
« % *
L -A»
MONTANA NEWS.
Mrs. Mary Flanagan, an aged resident
of Helena, is dead.
A Polish colony is to be started in Mon
tana bv an emigration expeditor named
Hof.
A subscription is being taken up in
White Sulphur Springs to raise funds for
purchasing instruments for the brass band.
In Virginia City last week the proposi
tion of levying a special tax of $1,000 for
bchool purposes was carried by a vote of
82 to 6.
Gold creek, where, the first discovery
of gold in Montana was made in 1861,
will probably be the place where the gold
spike will be driven.
Charles Wood, employed by the Wyom
ing stock company to look up stolen
horses belonging to the company, found
four on the Crow reservation last week.
While Mr. Hawley w;vs hauling a pso{
of logs across Gird's creek, Missoula coun
ty, last week, one of his horses got en
tangled in the harness and fell, and before
he could be cut loose, drowned.
John Peyton, the Missoula bunko man,
who is charged with swindling a Spaniard
out of $700 was examined last week and
held in the sum of $750 to await the
action of the grand jury.
A private dispatcli states that while
President Arthur and Senator Vest spend
much of their time fishing, Gov. Crosby
remains in camp consulting the mosqui
toes and vetoing their bilis.
The assessors, convention, which held a
meeting in Helena,Monday, decided upon
assessing the roadbed of railroads within
Montana at $4,500 per mile. Telegraph
and telephone lines will be assessed .at
$200 per mile.
The last telegram from the presidential
party was dated Aug. 13th and came from
an encampment near Terry's lake, under
the shadow of the Shoshone moun
tains, and just this side of the Wind river.
Everything was going along pleasantly.
The steam yacht Yosemite arrived in
Newport. R. L, on the 14th. She had on
board Henry Villard and family and a
number of Bavarian military and civic of
ficersj who come to the United States to
witness the completion of the Northern
Pacific railroad.
While Mr. Beecher was lecturing in
Miles City he chanced to change his posi
tion on the platform once somewhat
actively, and a bright little boy in the
audience turned to his mother with the in
quiry in a loud tone : "Mamma, is this a
dancing school?"
A man came to the Helena coroner and
notified him that the dead body of a man
lay in the road * a short distance from
town. 'He lost no time in hastening down
to the scene of the death, but wdien he
get there the remains got up and in a
voice that was husky with mountain dew,
expressed its ability to lick the corpse
viewer or any other man.
In the Legal Tender mine, in Warm
Springs district, a body of rich ore has
been struck which is apparently of large
proportions. It is composed of, brack
sulphurets and chloride of silver and will
assay away up in the thousands^ The
same company also struck another rich
lead last week in the Mother Green which
bids fuir to prove one of the largest leads
in the camp.
The New York Mining Record says
one of the richest camps in the territory,
considering the area covered and the de
gree of development reached, is that
known as Maiden, in the vicinity of Fort
Maginnis, in Meagher county. In that
small district there are already recorded
probably 150 locations, some of which are
widely known as exceedingly rich proper
ties.
How long will the fertility of Montana
lands endure? we are asked. Forever,
we say. Irrigated lands increase in fer
tility each year. Land in New Mexico
that has been irrigated for 200 years, is as
productive as at the beginning, and land
in the Nile valley, Egypt, has been culti
vated under irrigation for over. 4,000 yeare
without any perceptible diminution in
fertility. The Montana farmer has a
property that will enrich all his descend
ants forever.—Billings Herald.
Walter B. Jordan, a heavy capitalists of
Montana and Dakota, in company with
President Joseph Leighton, of the First
National Bank of Miles City, are guests
at the Merchants. They will leave this
morning for Bozeman for a short business
trip. Daring their sojourn here they had
a pleasant time trying to catch some of
the famous Yellowstone trout.
On Friday last that portion of the
Gallatin valley lying close along the
mountains was visited by a sfyort'hux.
severe hailstorm. Bozeman caught the
worst of it and much damage was done,
to* gärrieuft in atid arbnnd the town. Be
side, the crops along the base of the
mountains have been greatly damaged
Yesterday for the first time the mail
was carried from Livingston to Helena
under railroad contract by the regular
mail car. Heretofore the mail service
between the two cities lias been performed
by Gilmer, Salisbury & Co., who carried
the pouches by baggage car on tee rail
road for their own convenience as Wake
field & Hoffman are doing on the Park
branch.
Will not Hang.
Carl J. Adolfson who was to have been
hanged at Bozeman to-day has been grant
ed a respite by acting Governor Me Catch
eon that gives him a fresh lease of life un
til February 17th next. The object of
the postpon ment of the execution is to
allow the prisoner a a new r trial in the dis
trict, or else to grant, a review of his case
in the supreme court, our informant not
stating the matter very clearly. It is said
that delays are dangerous, but it is safe to
say that this delay brings to Adolfson 's
heart a feeling, almost approaching cer
tainty, that he will live to cheat the gal
lows. It is said as the day of execution
approached he had lost his stoicism and
evinced such signs as led those around
him to believe that he would show but
little fortitude' uhder the pressure of the
hangman's rope.
Noteworthy Trees.
I a the Skagit country, in Washington
Territory, is a spruce tree forty feet in
circumference. . It is uprooted and lies
in a deep slough.
A chestnut that was a sapling 400
rears ago has just, been exit bv Mayor
! >omar, of Salisbury, N. C, It meas
ured nine foot in diameter.
Two orange trees belonging to J. R.
Smith, Hawthorne, Ga., bore last sea
ion 8,000 oranges each. One of them
measures seven feet around and is sixty
Lot high.
A hugs chestnut tree glowing on tho
farm of Benjamin M. Reed, near Bay
View, Va., has borne a large crop of
nuts every year for a century. It
measures twenty-seven feet in circum
ference.
A huge excrescence on a birch tree
growing in the town of Westmore, Vt,
seen in profile a few feet away, re
sembles a grinning human face of
l^gantic proportions. It is four feet
and four inches from the top of tho
forehead to the tip of the chin.
The Crossage oak of England is prob
ably not less than fourteen centuries
old. The circumference of the trunk
was rd »out thirty fett, measured at a
height of about five feet from the
ground; but only about one-half of the
rdieH of the hollow trunk now remains.
It »till bears fifteen living branches,
each fifteen or sixteen feet in length. A
young oak grows from the oenter of the
hollow.
A yew that is-over 800 years old still
mda in the garden of the Herrenhaus,
(tarée ta, is thirty-fright feet high, and
its lower oircumrerenoe is five feet. Its
Ik-riiii- It is of the species Taxus
T
fei
rpocies is wholly extinct in the forest.
Tue premises on which it stands were
once owned by the father of Felix Mel
debsohn-Bartholdy, and the first execu
tion of "A Summer Night's Dream"
took place in this very garden. At the
time the Upper Chamber Hall was
erected, it ' vas Frederick William IV.
who saved the venerable tree from do
st: action.
An Appetite and a Memory.
The late Alexander H. Stephens was
a g astronomical mystery. He could
pack away an unconscionable amount
of food. Of course, he never went to
the dming-iiaU of the National Hotel,
where lw had made his Washington
home, for over thirty years, and when
his "frugal irreal" was eeiit up it was
enough to stagger the stoutest heart.
Throe or four kinds of meat, all the
vegetables, entrees aod desserts, and
cviiine and wine. But the old gentleman
wont through this outlay like a cyolone,
land came up to the attack regularly
three times a day on schedule time.
Ho would generally wind up the even
ing with a gam ? of whist with his old
cronies., and ho. was a bad man to fool
with in this industry.
Another phenomenal trait was . his
memory of nuitue and faces. He prob
ably knew every man, woman and dog
in Cb orgia, from their birth up, and
was familiar with every incident in their
lives. One evening a young man from
Georgia w.vi nshkred into the room of
btephern. No card had oome ju
advance, so the old gentleman could
not possibly have been forewarned and
forearmed. Thu visitor entered mod
ftstlv. saving he wae fcom Georgia, and
UHTidy wanted h> call and pay his re
sptvt-u Mr. fttepljens. held out his
htvr.y hard, sttmtimnud hia oaller close
ly /or aco tirai çninUtoa, and tb6n,o*lHbg
uitu by nai >«vy»aid he was delighted to
a** him. The young man was amazed,
artf wild that h s <my introduction to
M>. b'fv T <<-cw bad been twelve years
befrr* . and was ot iy a casual meeting.
Witscht replying, to this? tbè old gen
ÜcrJan went ;en kind!? enough to in
•remdif.g.'v.. •'tbirf nt *»•> remote part
o!' Georgia '«vhéré Ufe&phèns had
seldom Lech. T -

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