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The daily enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, September 04, 1883, Image 1

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THE DAILY
71
-
■■■aanEEBgaaaBB
VOL
NO.
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA, TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 4, 1383.
Price, Ten Cents
THÊ
DAILY enterprise.
pablis^a cvr
day except Sunday.
Publishers.
LIVI
^aSTJX,M.T..SEPr. 4,1883.
"ÏeEMS or SÏÏBSCEIPÎIOH.
_,T«r.W .......................
' ra-' 11 -:;....................
. . f , i>y cial1 ..............
TO CITY SUBSCRIBERS:
, v ^rv moxniug.........50cts per Week.
By 1 ft rr ' er ' ' • ..........................lOcts,
''" ,. 0 ............5cts each.
f ( r 30 Copies or more...........
ADVERTISIN'« RATES :
. nr y rn" adrertlwiaeats, rates will be given
f* j- Q . üliti » I* 2
,jinjlicabo u '
,,. )lice5 for one insertion only, fifteen
Lwï* 'for two or more insertions, ten
Sciilneeack.
S12 CO
oo
5 00
, LLL'N brothers,
i kE ,\L estate dealers.
,despondence solicited.
Office on main street.
T cEPEREEY-S
it 1
REAL ESTATE AGENCY,
lots for sale. Lots in Riverside
Addition.
Office over E. R. Dean & Co. 's.
ï a . S M I T H»
-ATTORNEY at law—
tfufon Main Street, over Lawrence & Stuff's.
n ?, T E A LeROY,
^ attorneys
AT LAW.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
and NOTARIES PUBLIC.
OJroon Main Street, Smith's block.
it
D. ALTON, M. !>.,
-SURGEON,
N. P. B. R. Co.
n W. GRAIn T, M. J).,
lit
I'UVSICIAN UNO SUHGEOX.
A!! uigbt and day calls promptly attended to.
Office al the PostoiSco.
JOHN H. ELDER,
LAW AND REAL ESTATE,
l«rg9 List of Town and Farm property.
Main Street, Livingston.
DLCHANAN & SCHULTZ,
CONTRACTORS & BUILDERS,
Fiat Cabinet Work and Undertaking a specialty.
Alionlors promptly attended to.
Plansand specifications for all kinds of build
up farmrbed on short notice. Give ue a call.
Main steet, Livingston.
JJ H. BU1M.ONG,
'justice of the peace,
Oflice on Main Street,
Utt.NGSTON, - - MONTANA,
1st Moral Bat
OF LIVINGSTON, MONT.
^Ihorlzod Capital,
tob Capital,
$250,000 OO
60,000 OO
taie Bight at Sold on all parts of
tiie World.
Collections Made,
And all Banking business promptly
attended to.
OFFICERS:
'•rxssTox Prop r>. £. Fogarty, Vice Pres.
l'iiEi» W ard, Cashier.
•' l 'MV P °\ n ^ TS -—Morcanti
W ( W.: Nafl '»nal Bunk of
. a, '"' Minn«*?ot«. st t>u 1. 1 '
rcantile National Bank,
!: of Illinois, Chicago;
"fa. St. Raul
Bank of Livingston.
SIEBBINS, MUND & CO.,
,lTir >KSton
Userai
Montan«
Transacts»
BAN KINT G bxJSINESS.
Lei
on .1» ,,
Suited Stitl prin j C l pal citie3 of the
u btates and Europe.
hr
7Rest Allott
ED ox TIME DEPOSITS.
^ ea>s r^cialty. Correspond
A- L. LOVE, OaihiaT.
Week.
each.
given
fifteen
ten
CHICKO
m
Gallatin County, M. T.
S12 CO
Is Sit
oo
5 00
street.
's.
to.
Railroad company arc building a Depot, Section House,
h at er- Tank, Etc., and many other substantial improve -
ments are going on. The town is indo rsed by the railroad,
company, who own a one-half interest in the same, and
will do ad m their power to farther its interests. The lands
lying north and, south are exceedingly fertile, and west
cattle ranches are numerous; east are the celebrated Mill
Creek, Emigrant Gulch and Six Mile Mining Districts
and in the place itself thrift, energy and intelligence are
to be found among its citizens. The Villa rd Mining Co's
claims adjoin the town on the east . The Gold and Silver
bearing quaHz mines in Emigrant Gulch are very rich, as
arc the Placer mines. Coal mines within one mile of the
town are being vigorously worked; and Iron , lime and
Sandstone abound. Before the town was plaited, lumber
was on the ground for a number of buildings, and before
the town was entirely surveyed buildings were in course
of construction .
THE TOWN IS YOUNG YET !
And thereby affords opportunities for securing lots at low figures, and we feel confi
dent that the constant and increasing demand for the same will advance prices from
twenty-live to fifty percent, within a short .time. Full particulars, prices and plats
will be furnished upon application to
ros
Ë3
LISBON, Dakota.
[^LIVINGSTON OFFICE ON MAIN
LIVINGSTON, Montana.
JTREET.^3
W. Savase
DEALERS IN
OO
OO
of
5S! I
ï IF'ta.mlisli.In.g' Gr©ocLs 9
CLOTHING, HATS & CAPS ;
Boots and Shoes, Etc.
Main Street,
Livingston,
ggwwr ag » *-. avm t .rt sPTTJs:J V Ta
BTTTT 'Y'OTXIR.
FANCY GROCERIES
-A.T THE
IPeoplesf CO.SÜ 3 . Q-rocer^,
DONOVAN & Co. Main St.
POSTOFFICE
DRUG STORE
Wright & Bartlett, Props.,
Dealers in
Drugs, Medicines, Paints , Oils, Books, Stationery, Ete.
Prescriptions careful!}' compounded day and night. Main street, Liviugston.
E. YOUNG, M. D*., will be found at the P. 0. Drug Store night and day.
Merchant Tailor.
Suits made in the Latest Style,Jand a Sure Fit always guaranteed. Also dealer in
Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Etc.
iAvingrt«^
Montana.
a
fa
m
-
as
Northern Pacific Officiais.
A circular issued by John Muir, su
perintendent of traffic on the Northern
Pacific, says that the business of that
department will be conducted under
his supervision by the following
officers:
Freight business east of Helena: J.
M. Hanuaford, assistant superintend
ent of fright traffic, St. Paul, Minn.;
freight business west of Helena, A.
L. Stokes, assistant superintendent of
traffic, Portland, Ore.; passenger busi
dess east of Helena. Charles S. Fee,
assistant superintendent of passenger
traffic, St. Paul, Minn.; passenger
business west of Helena, E. P. Rogers,
general agent passenger department,
Portland, Ore.; all ticket business, G.
K. Barnes, general passener agent, St.
Paul, Minn.; baggage business, W. H.
Lowe, general baggage agent, St.Paul,
Minn., Martin Winch, assistant gén
érai baggage agent, Portland, Ore.
The transportotion system over
which this management extends in
cludes tiie Northern Pacific railroad
company, the Oregon Railway & Navi
gation company, the Oregon & Cali
fornia company, and the Pacific coast
Steam s h i p corn par i y .
Tho First Train on the Park Branch.
In our reference to the National
Park branch in yesterday's issue of
the Enterprise we omitted mention
of the first passenger tram to run to
the terminus of the line, which was
an important train, not only from
being the first to run over the com
pleted line, but because of the ele
gance of its make up and ihe distin-1
guished passengers to whom the cars
belonged. It went out on Saturday
morning under the conductorship of
A.
Sent, who, if we remember
;
aright, was in charge of the first Park
brunch construction train, and has re
mained on the road over since as con
ductor of the regular and special pas
senger trains. Engineer T. J. Erwin,
with engine 163, furnished the motive
power. The train itself teas made up
as follows: The special car "Montana,*'
bearing Gen. Adua Anderson, chief
engineer of the Northern Pacific, and
Col. J. B. Clough, engineer in
charge of the Park branch; a special
of the Louisville & Nashville rail
road occupied by D. W. C. Rowland
superintendent of transportation on
that road accompanied by his party;
and last but not least the cars taken
up to the terminus for the use of the
Presidential party consisting of the
private car belonging to the general
manager Ilevvett of tiie C. & N. rail
way, the Northern Pacific sleeper
"Mandan" and a baggage car. This
Presidential train with its occupants
was the first to return eastward over
the Park branch. The afternoon train
on this same day (Saturday) took up
the private car "Railway Age'' which
at the recent railway exhibition in
Chicago was universally acknowledg
ed to he the finest car in the world. It
is spoken of elsewhere in this issue.
A New Story of Thad. Stevens.
Ex-Speaker Grow was telling me
some anecdotes of Thaddens Stevens,
who once, defending the public schools
that had with difficulty been legalized,
said that the Pennsylvania Dutch cared
nothing for educating their sons and
daughters provided they could import
and breed fine pig3 and cattle and
horses. This was made the most of by
Stevens' enemies and he had to defend
himself publicly when he got back to
Gettysburg, and did it with the argu
mentum ad hominem. "Isn't it true ? '
he said. "You, Jake Snyder, have got
a ram that cost you $1,000 and none of
your daughters can read. Yon, Hans
Deitman, paid $4,000 for a bull, but
make all your sons work winter and
summer. You, Jimmy Lootman, owu
Westphalia boars and brood sows, and
can't réad yourself. Don't you love
your beasts be ter than your "children
and your minds ?" The honest Dutch
men began to. cod fer: "That is right,"
they said; "he only told the truth.''
Stevens, instead of Muhlenberg, should
have a monument in the capital.—
"Gath," in New York Tribune.
It was Chaucer that appropriately
said : "There is nothing new but wha r
has once been old." Chaucer evidently
knew hash when he saw it .—Yanked
Statesman.
Farmers in the United States have
$12,210,253,362 of capital invested in
their business. Tills a am mol d h
fa : m% implements, live stock, fertilizers
are
for
ing,
the
ous
lem
to
girl
to
just
to
of
the
"the

su
J.
A.
of
G.
H.
CURIOUS AND SCIENTIFIC.
To prevent boiler incrustation, I)r.
Barnlet makes a mixture of fifteen
parts sodium, tbio-sulphate, ten pints
rain water, and ten pints glyeeroie,
which he adds to the water.
Dr. Ball, of the Paris Faculty of
Medicine, eiys that there is a broad
frontier between sanity and insanity,
and that most of ns enjoy this "frontier
life." He holds that the number of
persons perfectly reasonable on all
points throughout the entire period of
their existence form a small minority of
mankind.
A German patent has been taken
out for the manufacture of bottles, etc.,
from cast iron, containing 12 per cent,
of silicon, a compound which is said to
resist action of the strongest acids.
Charles Somerville, a machinist
employed at the lock works at Stam
ford, Conn., is so expert at his business
that he can cut an ordinary sewing
machine needle in two lengtuwise, drill
a hole through each half, and then
fasten them together so accurately timt
the place where it was separated can
not be seen.
Five times as many kinds of insect«
are estimated to exist as thero are
species of all other living creatures to
gether. Four hundred and fifty species
are fostered by the oak-tree alone and
200 by the pine. Humboldt, in 1849, esti
mated that between 150,000 and 170,009
species were preserved by collections,
and it is now supposed that the number
may be something like 750,000. With
how largo a part of nature's production
in this one field can any single individ
ual hope to become familiar ?
The latest theories concerning the
sun consider that it gives forth energy,
which appears as heat, light or eloe
trPity, according to the medium which
absorbs this energy. There are as
tronomical phenomena, especially
those in connection with the divers di
rections taken by the tails of comets,
which can be satisfactorily Recounted
for only on the hypothesis of electrical
action, which is supposed to pervade
the interplanetary spaces. The elec*
tricity in the sun is of opposite polarity
to that of space.
A favorite antidote for rattlesnake
poison in Mexico is, says Dr. Croft, in
Chemical News, a strong solution of
iodine in potassium iodide. The author
has tested some of the poison itself
with this solution, and finds that a
light brown amorphous precipitate rä
formed, the insolubility of which ex
plains the beneficial action of the anti
dote. When iodine cannot be readily
obtained, a solution of potassium
iodide, to which a few drops of ferric
chloride has been added, can, perhaps,
be used as an antidote to snake poison ;
it is a very convenient test for alka
loids.
The tenth census contains some fig
ures which will serve to give an idea of
the magnitude of the quarrying inter
ests of the country, which in 1880 gave
employment to 39,723 men, 8,059
horses and 851 mules; had 339 ma
chines for quarrying, 2,290 machines
for hoisting, 1,308 machines for dress
ing, and used $192,175 worth of explos
ives. The capital invested is given ai
$25,414:,4:97, and the value of the prod
uct in the census year at $18,350,055,
there being 1,525 quarries in all. Mar
ble and limestone lead the list with
65,523,965 cubic feet, followed by the
sandstone quarries with 24,770,930
cubic feet; crystalline silicious rocks,
with 5,118,998 cubic feet; and slate
with 457,267 squares, or 4,572,670 cubic
feet.
The novel, interesting process, an
nounced some time since in France, by
which the wool oh sheepskins may bo
transformed into velvet, is likely to
prove of industrial importance. Up to
the present time, sheepskins, tanned
with the wool on, have only been used
formats, lining for coats, etc., and tlio
wool, not having been subjected to any
preparation, is always matted or curled.
Observing that the innumerable fibers
are naturally disposed in the most per
fect and regular order, peculiarly fitted
for velveting, an ingenious chemist con
ceived the idea of cleaning the skin and
wool of all impurities, and of so pre
paring and dressing them that the
hairs would be well preserved, and not
entangled one with the other—the oc
currence of the latter contingency be
ing, of course, fatal to tho success of
the operation. After long and continu
ous experiments, success has be.'x
achieved, the article produced being
alike beautiful and serviceable, and
destined, it is thought, to become a
permanent and important article of
manufacture.
Morocco, peopled by ihe finest Mos
lem race in the world, is wholly closed
to Ohrmtianity.
«f- Fortunately.
I was chatting with a bright young
girl the other evening at a small Ger
man, when our attention was directed
to a tall and handsome woman who had
just entered the room. "Who is she?"
asked my companion, and I, wishing
to be poetical, answered: "A daughter
of the gods." "I don't know her," my
partner replied, critically exatainh g
the new-comer through her I« rguett**,
"the gods are not ia our sA. ''—Ac«*
Ytffk Worlt.

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