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The daily enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, September 22, 1883, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053382/1883-09-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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NO. 94.
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA, SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 22, 1833.
.Price, Ten Cents
rHH
pAILY enterprise.
pl , J1 w>-J'' w - r "*- r ' IMPtsu ° <1 ^
tj
Ljgsr 4 3EÏ33Y.
Publishers.
L IVIX^ T0X
M.T.,SEPT. 22, lbS3.
J ' ^2^3 oF SUBSCRIPTION,
$i 2 a
7 00
5 00
by ................
I *»3m 1 »y ,aai, ~;...............;*
r:»/„ 3 -hs ..... ...... ..............
TO CITT SUBSCRIBERS
. vm morning......... SM« per Week.
..................lOcti*,
pcrrt'v
.Cop.'
;<« or more..
.Sets each.
V '' aDYK«TWIN« KATES:
.. , „.Kvrtiaonienta, rates will be given
t Ä i lio_' a
... fi)T one insertion only, f.fteen
■ For two or wore insertions, tea
> ,*urh.
. 'lles brothers,
II nt;\L ESTATE DEALERS.
I
<ponience solicited.
Offlce on main street.
I.
I
«NSj?
T cEPEKLKV'S
ekal estate agency,
lots lor sale. Lots in Riverside
Addition.
OODe over E. R. Dean & Co 's
jl.SM/T ii,
^attorney AT LAW —
.Mdn Street,over Lawrence & Stuff's.
&, LeROY,
oars
1 attorneys
AT LAW.
Hi ESTATE AGENTS
and NOTARIES PUBLIC.
0 S:e«n Main Street, Smith** block.
D. ALTON, If. B.»
SURGEON,
N. P. R. R. Co.
W. GRANT, M. D.,
PUTSICIAK UNli SCRQSOK.
I LI night and day calls promptly attended to.
Office At the Postoflico.
lullNU. ELDER,
LAW AND REAL ESTATE,
rge List «f Town and Farm property
Main Street, Livingston.
KCIIA NAN & SCHULTZ,
CONTRACTORS <fc BUILDERS,
I Fi» Cabinetwork and Undertaking a specialty.
Ill orders promptly attended to.
Tim* and specifications for all kinds of build
bp famished ou short notice. Give ua a call.
Main ffteot, Livingston.
U. BI DLONG,
'justice of tiie peace,
Office on Main Street,
LIVINGSTON, - - MONTANA.
|Bank of Livingston.
STEBBINS, MUND & CO.,
lljTinjgston,
.Montana
general
Transacts a
BANKING
BUSINESS.
u.baqe on all the principal cities of the
United States aud Europe.
pTF.EEg- Allowed on
TIME DEPOSITS.
1 "'lections, made a specialty. Correspond
re solicited. * *
Ikited.
ASSOCIATED BANKS.
*''Jn«. Mnnd * Co , Miles City.
»tebhine. Mund & Co., Billing*.
|H.. ,s tj'bbins, Conrad A Co., Buffalo, Wyo'g
"Om «National Rank, Deadwood, D. T.
A For. Central. 1). T.
Mcbbias, Foi A Co , Speanlah, D. T.
A. L LOVE, Cashkr.
ÎL
mi Eli
0F UVINGSTON, MONT.
r ,hor: ^ Capital,
Capital,
$ 350,000 00
50,000 OO
it and Sold on all jarts of
. tte Worn
Elections Made,
**' business promptly
»tlnndeU to.
|C ^. T0 , ' 0p ncgR S:
lm waMBaaflgMRaAW EP
CKORY
Gallatin County, M. T.
Is situated on- the National Parle Railroad, twenty-eight
miles^ from Livings!on and about the same distance from
t>e National Park. At this point the Northern Pacific
Railroad company are building a, Depot, Section House,
fl ater- Tank, Etc., and many other substantial improve'
ments are going on. -The town is indo sed, by the railroad
company, who own a orte-half interest in the same, and
will da a l m their power to further i?s interests. The lands
tying north and south are exceedingly fertile, and west
cuttle ranches are numerous ; east are the celebrated\ Mill
Creek, Emigrant Gulch and Six Mile ftlining Districts
and in the place itself thrift, energy and intelligence are
to be found among its citizens. The VillardMinin g Go's
daims adjoin the town on the east. The Gold andl Silver
bearing quartznifnes in Emigrant Gulch-are very rich , as
are the Placer m ines. Goad mines within one mile of the
town are being vigorously worked; and Iron, Lime and
Sandston e abouti d. Before the town was platted, lumber
was on the ground for a number of buildi/igs, and. before
the town ivas entirely surveyed building* were in course
of construction. <
THE TOWN IS YOUNG YET !
And thereby affords opportunities for securing lots at low figures, and we feel confi
dent that the constant and increasing demand for the same will advance prices from
twenty-five to fifty percent, within a short time. Full particular, prices and plats
will he furnished upon application to
65^:
JL,
LISEON, Dakota.
LIVINGSTON, Montana.
ÊT^LlVINGSTON OFFICE ON MAIN STREET. Jt^J
it
postoffic;
i-4
U-G S T O R
Wright & Bartlett, Props.,
Dealers in
Drugs , Medicines , Paints, Oils, Bocks, Siatiofiery, Etc.
Prescriptions carefully compounded day and night. Main street, Livingston.
BUY YOIJH
FANCY GROCERIES
■A.T uraiE:
Peoples' Co-sib. < 3 -rocer 37 %
DONOVAN & Co. Main St.
Just Received,
The Latest styles and Fash
ions
and Winter
Clotliin
Fine Gents' Dress Suits,
In great variety; Warranted
the best in style, pricee and
quality, at
I. ORSCHEL & BRO.
Preparing for the t Constitutional Conven
tion.
A convention to frame a constitu
tion foi the future state of Montana
is to meet at Helena on the 14th of
January next, and an election.of dele
gate? to comprise such convention is
to be held on the 6th of November.
Each county is to havejhe number of
delegates designated by the act of
legislature, (Gallatin county has five,)
and in addition each of the Judicial
districts has two delegates, but of
<>f these two each voter casts his bal
lot for only one, it .being tiie evident
intention of the legislature to divide
the representation between the two
political parties. Inasmuch as the
framing of a state constitution is a
work requiring more than casual at
tention, it is high time that some
preparation be male looking toward
the selection of suitable delegates.
With this view, the Republican party
of Montana, by the secretary of its
Territorial committee, Col. Sanders,
has issued lengthy instructions re
garding primary conventions. The
county committees are ex
pected to call county conven
tions to put the delegates in
nomination, and as there are no com
mittees for the judicial districts, the
territorial committee takes charge of
this and calls conventions for each.
The First Judicial district comprises
the counties of Dawson, Custer,/ Y'el
Iowstone, Gallatin, and Madison, to
whom the committee apportions dele
gates as follows. Dawson 2, Custer 3,
Yellowstone 2, Gallatin 4. and Madi
son 3. These delegates are supposed
to ba selected by the county conven
tions of their respective counties, and
it should be remembered that by the
terms of that call they have power to
select one person and one only, who is
to be the party nominee for the office
of didegate from the judicial district
to the constitutional convention. The
convention for this district will meet
in Bozeman on the 17th day of Octo
ber at 12 o'tdoek noon. It should be
borne in mind that this caucus is a
matter separate and distinct from the
conventions to be hereafter called for
each county, at which the delegates
allowed by the Act from the various
counties will be put in nomination,and
it may also be repeated that this ex
planation refers only to the Republi
can organization; the Democratic
party is yet to be heard from, but will
probably adopt tactics similar to those
here explained.
Villard's Return.
The three last sections of the Yil
lard excursion came in last evening.
The first arrived about 5:30, and had
on board Henry Villard and such of
his friends as did not choose to visit
the National Park. The train remain
ed about an hour, during which time
many of the party alighted from the
cars and walked around the streets,
viewing the sights evidently with the
greatest interest. Mr. Villard ac
companied by his sister and his
diughter, explored the town pretty
thoroughly, and with euwbus eyes
All of the many from whom an opin
ion was obtained, expressed them
selves highly pleased with a close m
spection of Livingston, a large num
ber of them saying that the evidences
of prosperity exhibited by this town
were more marked and impressed them
more forcibly than at any place they
had visited on the whole trip. This
train w ill push on through to New
York as fast as possible. Mr. Villard.
is to entertain his German friends at
his residence on the Hudson before
they re-cross the water, and it may be
that preparations for exercises of hos
pitality—doubtless on a grand scale-r
takes him to the east in advance of the
balance of the party. About seven
o'clock the other two trains arrived,
and after a short stay left for up the
branch carrying their occupants to see
the wonders of the National Park.
All the tfaiiuuwere more thinly occu
pied than when they went west two
weeks ago. the passengers being for
the most part the German and Eng
lish contingent in the excursion party.
The American guests have mostly re
turned to their homes in straggling
parties. ,
A box of dynamite was discovered
within the precincts of tiie Palace of
the Sultan of Turkey.
mm
NEWS NOTES.
Charles and Bob Ford, slayers of
Jesse James, appeared at a variety
theatre in Louisville and were hissed
and hooted at by the audience in the
scene where Bob Ford shoots James.
They say they will not come to Ken
tucky again.
A Deadwood dispatch of the 19th
says: In a fight last Friday at Little
Missouri, over a gaTne of cards, J. M.
Prüden, Mat Carrol, and Jack Harris
his stock tender, killed one cowboy
and mortally wounded another.
Last Wednesday evening as Henry
Ward Beecher was stepping into his
carriage in front of the Coliseum, in
Oakland, where he had been lecturing,
a lady made a quick advance upon the
preacher, and. seizing him by the
hand, detained him until she had im
pressed a large, loud, warm kiss upon
his mouth. There is something about
the old gentleman that possesses an
irresistable charm for the ladies.
Slang Words and Phrases.
Just listen for a moment to oust fast
young man, or the ape of a fast young
man, who thinks that to be a mail In*
must speak in the dark phraseology of
slang. If he does anything on bis own
responsibility, he does it oi* liis owru
"hook." If he sees anything remarka
bly good he calls it a "stunner tlw
superlative of which is a "regular stun
ner." If a man Js requested to pay a
tavern bill, he is asked if he will "stand
Sam." If he meets a savage-looking
dog he calls him an "ugly customer.
If he meets an eccentric man, he call*
him a "rummy old cove." A sensible
man i3 a "chap that is up to snuff."
Our young friend never scolds, but
"blows up;" neve': pays, but "stumps
up;" never finds it difficult to pay, but
is*"hard up;" never feels fatigued, but
is "used up." He hn3 no h it, but shel
ters his head beneath a "tile." Ho
wears no neckcloth, but surrounds iva
throat with a "choker." He lives no
where, but there is some place where
he "hangs ont." He never goes any
where or withdraws, but he "bolts"—
he "slopes"—he "mizzles"—he "makes
himself scarce"—he "walks his chalks*
—he "makes his tracks"—be "cuts h a
stick" or is "fired out " The highest
compliment you can pay him is t> toil
him that he is a "regular brick." If 3
does not profess to be brave, but Id*
prides himself on being "plucky.*
Monev is a word which he lr»s forgot
ten, but he talks a good deal about
"tin," and "the needful," "the rhino,"
aud "the ready." When a man speak#
he "spouts;" when he holds his peace
he "shuts up;" when lie is humiliated,
he is "taken down a peg or two," and
"made to sing small."
Reason and Imagination.
If science and reason have stalked
into the new scene in sla ure greater
than that of life, each as colossal as tao
Moses of Angelo, the sacred imagina
tion of religion need not hide away iu
alarm, but she, too, must aspire to anew
height and beauty; and disrobing her
self of the morbid rags of the past,
those garments covered with pictures*
of fiends—vestments of death worn by
victims of the inquisition on the w ay to
the pile of faggots—she must put on
diviner raiment, woven by tenderer to' Il
ers of looms and with threads of finer
silk, and must rise as colossal in beauty
as reason is colossal in power. If
science and reason are laying bettor
foundations of thought, let imagination
hasten and build upon these better
stones a better temple of God, and make
it tremble with a still holier music, and
resound with a wider aud more rational
eloquence. Not afraid of this g 'gun tie
reason, let this exalted poetry of tbo
soul extend to reason one hand, and,
bolding it in friendship, point with tin
other to the sky; for demonstration and
imagination, acting in harmony, cau
find the truest answer to the problems
of human life .—David Swing.
An Enthusiastic School.
Education in Tangier, and in ail
Morocco in fact, is limited to learning
passages from the Koran by heart. Î
tnnlrarl in nnrvn a. snlmnl wi u'a'i t » na
ooked in upon a school, which was in
a little stone bulding twenty feet
square without any window, the* front
door standing open to admit light.
The place was full of boys, sitting
cross-legged on mats spread on the
ground, all with bats on aud bundled up
with all the clothing they possessed to
keep warm. The "master" set on *
box with his hat on and w as provided
with a long stick. The boys had tin
Hates or pieces of paper, on which
were written in the peculiar Arabia
'characters some passage * from the
Koran, and the boys kept swayrng
backward and forward, repeating* the
words at the top of their voices. Wfiej
any boy skipped or f iltered, a rap on
the head'by the stick of the master sat
him agoing again a little' loader than
the rest. It was the muet euthusiaetio
school I ever saw.
Gray
reapect
Baoork
hairs are
that
only
egcjte
of
envy;—

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