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The daily enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, September 24, 1883, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053382/1883-09-24/ed-1/seq-6/

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Big Banknotes.
Tlie largest amount of a bar» knote ir
circulation in 1827 yvas ;£i,UA>. !-•
said that two notes for .Ulffff.'hX) e:u
and two for £50,00.-) each, were on ce en
graved and is-sited. A butcher, \\..
Lad amassed an immense fortune, m ta
wartimes, went one «lay wi Ii erne o
these £50,000 notes to a pi ivdte 1
asking for the loanöf £5,000, and w::s *
icg to deposit the big note as m ear.
in the banker's hands, saying he lia,
kept it for years. The £5,000 was -a
once handed over, but the bank a
hinted, at the same time, to the buieho
the folly of hoarding such a sum a.'«
losing the interest. "Wen* true, sir,
replied the butcher, "but I likes t :
look on't so vvery well that I hav.
t'other one of the same kind at ) one/
00
An eccentric genclemaii in Lo
framed a bank post bill for L-j !
and exhibited it for five years i:i one <
his sitting-rooms. The fifth year it
died, when the "picture" was at one
taken down and cashed by the heir ;.
Some years ago, at a nobl naan':
house near Hyde Park, a dispute arcs«
abouta certain passage in Scripture
and, a dean who was present denyuv;
that there was any such text at ad, .
Bible was called for. When it wa
opened a marker was found in it,.which
on examination proved to be a ban;-:
post bill for £40,000. It might possib'
have been placed there as a reproach to
the son, who, perhaps, did not consist
the Bible so often as his mother could
have wished .—London Titbits.
A Tliree-Cent Stamp Worth $100.
In 1810, while awaiting supplies from
the department at Washington, the
Postmasters of certain cities were au
thorized to issue stamps temporarily.
Among others so issued was the Post
master at Bratfcleboro. Eight hundred
stamps were printed, and of these one
half were burned, Collectors have Leon
in search of some of these stamps, and
it was considered a hopeless matter to
procure one of them. One collecter,
however, who was shrewder than tee
rest, instituted a search for the en
graver, whom .lie found residing in
Springfield, and he had still reman ing
seven of the previous squares, winch
lie disposed of to the collector for 75
cents each, beside furnishing indubita
ble proof of the genuineness of the iss ue,
the very existence of which wa ;
doubted. The fact of the purchase
leaked out, and a dealer offered Cd
apiece for six of the seven. This was
refused by the original purchaser, who
demanded five times that sum, and be
fore the money reached him, although
it was sent with promptitude, he had
an offer of CIO apiece. Being an hon
est ma i, he stuck to his first offer, and
pa: ted with six for $30. The most
precious of the lot, which bore the en
graver's name, lie retained possession
of, and this one he sold for $100. — Bos
ton Traveler.
Curious Indian Belief.
The Sanpoel tribe number about 400
Indians and they all belong to a sect
known as the dreamers. They are
looking for another flood, which they
expect soon to come upon the arth. In
order to be prepared they have secured
all the necessary material for the build
ing of an ark, in which to sail off, as
Noah did, when the flood comes.
Among the material is 50,000 feet of
lumber. The ark is to be fifty feet
long and about fifty or sixty feet wide.
The dreamers have a small following
among the Indians of the Palouse,
Snake River, Warm Springs, Umatilla*
and other tribes. They believe that
the whites will all be drowned when
'the flood comes, and that they only will
be saved, and will be enabled to live off
the fat of the land without having to
work at all. — Seattle (IF. T.) Lost-In
telligencer.
of
et
s
of
.or
A
Where the Lawyer Comes In.
"I settled with tlie dissatisfied heirs
fer the estate and obtained their re
ceipts for $1,200 and a release from all
further claim," said a Brooklyn lawyer,
in reference to a warmly-contested will,
in which about $ : 5,000 worth of prop
erty was involved.
"Was that all the contestants re
ceived ?"
"That all ! Don't you want to leave
anything for tlie lawyer?" and the
colloquy terminated. The residue of
the estate, was bequeathed to the willow
and two children of the decedenf.—
New York Herald .
When Thelwall was on his trial for
high treason lie wrote the following note
during the evidence for the prosecution,
and £ent it over toErskiuo, his counsel:
"I am determined to plead my cause
myself." Risk me wrote back: "If von
do you. will l*e hanged.". To which
Thclwall replied: "Then I'll be hanged
In the German Capital.
This city lifts the reputation all oyer
the continent of being exceedingly
• wicked, and I don't think that the char
acter which it bears does it the slight
est injustice. Crime in this country
differs in many material respects from
tlie crime which, unfortunately, we
have become so kamiliar with in Ameri
ca. There are many murders, to be
sur-q but they are nearly all of the de
] ibi n. to, doeply planned order, while
thé majority of tbi _
Guitemi wonld put it, on oitr rideof
ore
ir
*
a
himself deliberately—the whole horri
ble tragedy being performed with as
much coolness as if he were simply get
ting ready to take Ills fa mil v cut for_a
walk. In Chicago one* man asks an
other to treat, the other will be bless d
if he will, a scuffle ensues, a shot is
fired, and all is over. Here bar-room
fighti are very rajfo. "When the well
behaved Berliner takes it into his head
that he must have blood, he goes to ids
home, closes the doors, staffs rags in
the keyhole, and enjoys himself pri
vately.
1 cannot understand why it is that
the Germans are so given to commit
ting such horrible mud rs. They are
as a people rattier light-hearteu and
light-spirited than otherwise. They
are so iable, jolly, and apparently in
elm od to make the best of everything.
-It is too often too e so that a ' father
takes t ie lives of his wife and little
ones and kills himself because he lias
come to the conclusion, after long
bro cling over it, that they will all l o
better oif out of the wor d. It is not
p.lwav *, nor even frequently, the case
that the horrible tragedies committed
in Be rlin are -caused by extreme pov
erty; on the coat ary, the very poor
seem to bear their lot better than these
moderately well-off. Despondency is
the great cause of murder and suicide
here, and many Germans have agreed
with me in attributing life cause of this
despondency to the vast amount of
beer and tlie almost iudigedible food
consumed by the middle classes. The
poor consume a great deal of beer, too,
and eat a great deal of cheese, raw*
ham, pork-sausages, pickled cabbage,
black bread, and other articles of diet
calculated to breed longings for mur
der in the human breast, but they
work so hard that they manage to di
gest it .—Consul Flynn's Letter to
Chicago News.
Controlling Forces.
There are three kinds of force con"
troibng human affairs—material force,
such as is exercised by the athlete, the
multitude or the body politic; the force
cf will, such as brings the hero safely
over the obstacles of life to success in a
prédomina 1 ' ing aspiration, and the force
of virtue, which is the attachment to
moral truth, swavLig, elevating and
confirming tho will. The last of those, 1
unanimous .consent, ?, m.vlo •the su* I
perior one, yet it s > depends upon tho
former—ti e force of (ho will—that it
a be distinguished from if on y by its
et (deal aim. Indeed, except for de.bg
t'ng t- e direction of moral force, tue
will, considered in a pure ard simple |
s n o, is the force by which the affai. s
of life arc shaped, since there is no vital
world-*g in society, or by the individual,
.or of virtue, save through its energy.
A man without a will accomplishes
nothing; with a will, despite all obsta
cles from within or without, he fulfills a
purpose and attains a destiny.— Leo.
Or. IiambauU •
AND
LUNCH COUNTER.
0. H. -MOOSE, Propr.
Main Streit, LIVfflGSTOff, -MONTANA.
Milwaukee Keg Beer Alwaj-« on Tap and
Imported Clicese and Summer Saus
age Sandwiches.
Ê^GIVE 4 . CALL .^3
the
THE OASIS
Bowling Alley aM Gaining Hall,
GHEZVM $ LISE, Propr 's.
The finest selected stock of
WIES, LIQUORS & EîFORTED CI3ÂRS
To be found in the city.
MAIN STREET - LIVINGSTON, M,
F. H. LORING,
proprietor ot the
GILT EDDGEEI
SAMPLE BOOMS.
CHOICEST TOES,. LIQUORS aM CIGARS.
—Princely furnished parlor room in connection.
MAIN STREET. - LIVINGSTON.
——*-—
%
ETROPOLITAN
BOOM,
Livingston.
and Fixtures. Choicest of Wines,
UqooraMd Cigars.
as
an
d
is
ids
in
in
o
is
of
J. MURRAY,
DEALER IN
Wines and Liquors
Fine
Imported
me Stic
and Be>
GA R
Second Street,
LIVINGSTON,
31. T.
FEED W. DRAPER,
PROPRIETOR OF THE
.eadquarters
in
Li
iirUnTl
I Mil.
'£5
Second Street, next to the Opera House.
isye
Large stock of nothing but stiictlv
first-class"
LIQUORS, TOES AID , CIGMS.
Finest Billiard and Pool Tables in
the city. 1
R. C. Gri
FOIl
BLACKSMÎTHING.
lie makes a specialty of horse shoeing. Wagon
shop* in connection, and job work of ;.ii ki7.ds
nc'i'tiy and promptly done. Shop at the lower
end of r»l.iijif>tieet.
a
____________
1 LIVINGSTON. IV! ONTANA
I *
|
At tho Last Crossing of the
Yellowstone River,
AND
Junction of the National Park Branch R.
R. With Main Line cf N. P. R. It.
EÏÏD CF 3 RAILROAD DIVISIONS.
and
's.
Railroad Company
and Round Houses.
ar<^ building Shops
Good Bituminous
the town.
Coal Wines west of
Clark's Fork's Mines reached from Liv
ingston.
National Fork entered from Livingston.
For plats and information of lots in the
Original Townsité and adi «.cent to tlie
Depot, apply to
GENERAL LAND AGENT N P R. RCO.
St. Paul. Mum,
NICKEL'S, W ILBUR & NICHOLS,
Jamestown, Dakota, or
FRANK BUSH,
?
Agent Land Dept. N. P. R R. Co.,
Livsngston, Montana.
1
L. Taylor, Gen'l Townsite Agent.
EARLEY & HOLMES,
Livery, Feed and Sale Stables.
Full rigs or saddle horses to let, and care
ful drîvèrs furnished if desired.
M j
m
tlie Park I
A . .Ji
other point, »head of all
te'te '/ V v/ ■
,A •' ;S>- .^1^3
Montana Lumte
COMPANY.
OFFICERS :
W. C. Edwards, Prest., $t. Paul, Minn.
J. R. Hathaway, Vice-Prcst., Billings.
C. A. Wcstum, Sec. and Treas., Billings.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Lumber
LATH,
SHINGLES,
* MOULDINGS,
- SASH,
DOORS,
WINDOWS,
Building Paper, Etc.
YARDS AT
Billings and Livingston.
F. L. MINTIE,
Manager Livingston Yard.
When You Leave the Train at
LrvTngston, - - Montana I
ENQUIRE FOR THE FREE HACK TO THE
?
erchants
j.
The tab le is supplied with everything the 'market affords. Parlors for th|
accommodation of lad ies, and tlie house throughout complete with everything nece.* j
sary for tlie comfort of guests.
CHOICE WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGAESl
At the Bar in comicction with the House.
Terms Reasonable.
Park Street, Opposite the Depot]
WM.MITCHEL l , Proprietor.
SPAT THE GATE OF WONDERLAND!
The House Par Excellence.
i he Livingston Hotel
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA.
The Largest and Most Commodious, accommodating double the number ofl
guests of any other hotel in the town. An excellent cuisine; the tablesnpJ
plied with ali the luxuries of the season. Parlors and Rooms litter! up with!
all the comforts of a home, with polite and courteous attendants. Special atj
tention given to Tourists and Travelers, and information freely given relativ^
to the innumerable-wonders, and different routes through the Great Nationa
Park.
A Free Bus attends the arrival and departure of ali Trains.
Choice Wines. Liquors and Cigars at the Bar in connection with the House|
1 /
TERMS
REASONABLE.
J. P>. aSTOL^AISr, Propr
Brunswick Hotel!
F'
M. C. MURPHY, Propr.
gnests î raveiers ateKing neat and ccnacrtaLie reams am
them at the BRUNSWICK, Main street, Livingston, Montana
This elegantly appointed and carefully managed hotel is now ready fof
Travelers steking neat and ccmtcrtalie romns and a well sui P KÛ
Star Groceryi
prop
CLARK STREET,
■ $
LIV
jSGSTOS'
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
Staple and Fancy Grocefl
m
»

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