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The daily enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, September 27, 1884, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053382/1884-09-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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il» gaily CSnttrpri».
Published every dsy except Sunday.
WRIGHT k HENDRY, ; Pnbliahera.
LIVINGSTON, M.T, SEPT. 27, 1884
Entered at the postofflce in Livingston, M. T.
as second-class mail matter.
The delegation from Gallatin county at
the territorial republican convention in
Helena to-day will cast its lirst vote for
W. \Y. Alderson, editor of the Bozeman
Courier. The vote is, presumably, with
no intention of nominating liim, but
merely as a compliment.
The territorial republican convention
meets in Helena this afternoou at four
o'clock and will probably not complete
its woik this evening. The most prom
inent candidates are A. C. Botkin, of Hel
ena, and H. Knowles, of Butte. It is said,
though not reliably, that T. C. Power will
also be a candidate before the convention.
The democratic convention of Deer
Lodge county had some such a fuss as did
that of Gallatin. Anaconda is a new
town that is now the largest in the coun
ty. though Deer Lodge town is the county
seat. In convention Anaconda wanted a
fair representation on the county ticket.
It did not get a fair deal aud is making a
kick.
The republican convention of Gallatin
county has done its work well. There
was no deception used—no sneak work,
uo falsehood, no treachery, no conceal
ment of the deadly weapon called ring
rule, and uo use of such a weajion to kill
the will of the majority. So far as can
be learned a most harmoqious meeting
was held. The republicans learned a
lesson from the work of the democrats,
and have already begun to reap a harvest
of profit. ___
The Bozeman Chronicle because the
Entekpiuse said by clear mistake that
Frank K. Armstrong, in the county dem
ocratic convention, voted for himself
launches forth in a tirade against this
paper, the people of Livingston and their
claims before that convention. It winds
up the malediction with a few words ac
knowledgmg that "since the above was
written die Enterprise has retracted the
insinuations against Mr. Armstrong.' We
feel morally certain that the retraction
was before the editor of the Chronicle
when he wrote the first word of that at
tack ; but we do not care. We made the
error complained of, aud did all in our
power to retract aud rectify it, and for
that small offense the dogs of war should
not be turned upon us even though
those lielligcrent canines be but
harmless poodle pups. The Clironicle
also says it dares impugn the
democracy of any man who does not
stand by the county ticket. Well, we
dare impugn the common sense, the inde
pendence and freedom, and the knowledge
of political cleanliness and political filth
of any man that supports that ticket in
full. No man offends us by impugning
our democracy, but the latter qualities
enumerated we trust will uever be im
pugned. ,
Sheep Sales.
Chronicle: In the past week there
have been a *out 13,000 head of sheep
changed hands in this vicinity. Mr.
Charles Anceny bought 5.000 from the
Ye » Bros. Messrs. Sloan & Burns about
4.000 and Mr. Cady has taken about
5.000 ou shares. The latter were pur
chased of Mr. Dobson, of Umatilla
county. Ore., and of Mr. McKinley of
the same place. There still remains
in this vicinity to be disposed of about
5.000 head.
A New Secretary of the Treasury.
Walter Q. Gresham has been ap
pointed to fill the office of secretary
of the treasury of the United States,
made vacant bv the death of Charles
J. Folger. Mr. Gresham has been for
the past twenty months tiie postmas
ter-general, to which position he was
appointed after the death •>{ Hon. Mr.
Howe, of Wisconsin. It is sail that
Mr. Gresham's appointment is but
temporary, and that when the man
for whom the portfolio is designed is
in position to accept it, Mr. Gresham
will resign to accept a United States
circuit judgship.
Very Had.
A dispatch from Fort McKinney,
near Buffalo, Wyoming, says: The
mangled and lifeless body of Gillie
Leigh, member of the British parlia*
ment, was found at the base of a
precipitous cliff in the Big Horn
mountains« Leigh was out there
with a small English pleasure party«
He left camp the 14th inst for a stroll,
and was not heard of afterward till an
eight-day search revealed his dead
I>ody. The remains will be shipped
to England.
--♦--—•
PrMiil«atial Wealth.
[Utica Herald.]
Gen. Grant is estimated at $200,000,
which makes him tae richest ex-presi
dent since Bnchanan. Haves is not
rich, though in a well-to-do con ation.
Andy Johnson and Abraham Lincoln
each left $50, 'n O. Mi.lard Filin:ore
made a snug fortune out of the law,
and was comparatively rich when he
became president. G eu. Taylor sa ed
his army salary, and was in independ
ent circumstances when elected to the
presidency. He held the office kard;y
a year and a half, and left a property
worth *50,000. Tyler was a bankrupt
when the death of Harrison made k.m
president, and he married a fortune in
-uiss Gardner. He went out of office a
rich mm, but he became a leader in the
confederacy, and his property was
simk in tile general ruin occasioned by
the war,
,) âmes K. Polk had good opportunity
to make money before ins election, and
he was an economist by- nature. He
left $150,000. iUartin \ an Buren was
the richest of all our presidents,
his estate be ng estimated at $*00,
ÜÜÜ. He made money as a law
yer and also as a politi lan,
and his real-estate purchases beea.ue
immensely profitable, but his -mo.;ey
has been almost entirely wa ted by his
lie.rs. Andrew Jacksou was not a
money-making man. ce lived nine
years after the expiration of his term of
office, and left on.y a large landed e ate
commonly known as the a*. ei mitage.
.. ohn v^uincy Adams was a methodical
business man and an economist, lie
leit about *60,000, which at that time
was a large sum. J nines onroe was
so poor in his old age that he became
the guest of his son-in-law, .Samuel L.
Uouveneur, in this city, where he died.
Mad son was more successful in taking
ca.e of his money, and lett his widow a
property which enabled her to live
handsomely in Washington till the end
of her days.
.. etlerson passed his lost days in
much distress, and was really afraid
that his piace would be sold by the
slier ill. He was an object of public
charity and a subscription w as o ened
in his behalf in this city, but his death
occurred so soon that the benevolent
effort w as not required. Old John Adams
left an estate worth *80,000. Wash ng
ton was a r.ck man for his day, his
wealth being solely due to marriage.
Mount \ ernon was not a productive
property, but Mrs. C nrtis brought him
a large fortune wiiicn she inherited
from her first h sbaad. Viewing our
pres.dents in a merely pecuniary esti
mate, there are a hundred men in this
cAy each ox wi.om could buy out the
who.e of the.il. v, hen <>ue contem
plates their true worth, however, one
sees how utterly poor mere wealth be
comes in comparison.
Vain ot His Uniform.
[Bow Bells.]
Napoleon Bonaparte (according to
the new memoir ox hi n by Mme. Junot,
w'ho knew him from iiis youth up, j was
one of the men who 'Vannot take a
joke. The day on wli.ch he first wore
a soldier's uniform he w..s as vain of
his clothes as a west end carpet war
rior. Mme. Junot adds: "There was
one part of his uress which ha l a very
droll appearance —that w*as his boots.
They were so high and wide that his
thin little legs seemed buried in their
amplitude, loung people are always
rea -y to obsei've anything ridiculous,
and as soon as my sister and I saw
Napoleon enter the drawing roam we
burst into a loud tit of laughter. Bona
parte could not relish a joke, and when
he found kiinsel: the object of merri
ment he grew angry.
"My sis er, who was some years oldér
than i, told him taut since he w re a
sword he ou^ht to be gallant to iad.es,
and, instead of being angry, should be
happy that they joked witn k m. 'You
are nothing bat a child, a little school
girl/ said Napoleon in a tone of con
tempt. Leciic, who was 12 or 13 years
of age, was highly indignant at
be.ng called a child, and she
hastily resented the aiïr out by re
plying to Lon.iparte, *'And you are
nothing l ut a puss in boots/ This ex
cited a general laugh among all present
except . apo.eou. whose rage 1 wdl not
attempt to describe/' He w «s t. cn 16
years of g a, and his professor or his
tory had a.ready written of liim in h:s
notes, "Corsican by nature and ov
character, he will go far if circum
stances uvor him." Yet he could be
vain of his uniform.
Youn* Dien of the Mouth.
[.'• r . Quad's Seir. it LeDc..]
The destiny of the south is in the
hands of men under years of age.
in looking about a southern town its
young men are the first point to he
considered. Within ten years they will
push it to the front or abandon it.
Jbere in Selma foar-fifths of the business
is in the hands of men under Lo, and a
great snare ox it in still younger hands.
The boy s who were 8,10 and 12 years
old when the war closed are now the
business men of the south, and they are
foil of enterprise. Here in Selma they
appear to be an earnest, industrious
set, and are advancing towards pros
perity. Yon find them cheerful when
the older men are gloomy; yon find
them hopeful when the older men talk
of hard times: yon find them ready to
encourage all legitimate enterprises
when their fathers «re content with
what they have.
C8w-OSgCSCCCgQ = e sogc ° 0 S —
eee
THE GILT
: F.H. LOSING, Prop.,
CHOICEST IKES LIQUORS and CIGARS.
Priac«ly furnished parlor rooms in connection.
BRICK BLOCK MAIN STREET.
o o c 8ssee:oî: oessosscaecaoo
RÜD. ANBACH,
Proprietors of the
Chicago Beer Hall.
Fine Concert
Every Night
Afternoon.
and Sunday
Hot and Cold Lunch
At any time during the day. Choice
Liquors and Cigars always on hand.
Hot, Cold and Shower
Baths at Nick Imo's B
Street Barber shop.
JOHN O. SAXE & CO.
NEWS AND FRUIT DEALERS,
AND CONFECTIONERS.
The latest eastern Dailies. Illustrated Journ
als and Magazines always on hand.
MAIN STREET.
D M. REESE,
CONTRACTORAND BUILDER
STORE FITTING A SPECIALTY.
Plans and Specifications given for any kind
oi work.
Office at the Brunswick Hotel
NEW BLACKSMITH SHOP
Opened on Lewis St., near M. E. church.
Wm. Nevenhuisen, Prop.
Have had long experience in Eastern Shoe
ing Shops and can make all kinds of (0) Shoes.
Defy competition in Shoeing Crippled horses.
Do all kinds of Smithing and Carriage work.
Also make new plow-shares. Give me a call.
GOING EAST
J—OR—
GOING WEST
No matter whiqh, the . ; :
IS YOUR LINK,
As it will take you in either direction between
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, DULUTH,
G LY NDON. MOORHEAD, FARGO,
CASSLETON, VALLEY CITY',
JAMESTOWN. MINNE
WAÜKAN,
(DEVIL'S LAKE,) MILNOR, LA
MOURE, BISMARCK, MANDAN,
GLENDIVE. BILLINGS, LIV
INGSTON, -< •
Yellowstone National Park
Helena, IsÆ. T.,
DEElt LODGE, BÜTTE CITY, MISSOULA
SPOKANE FALLS, WALLA
WALLA, THE DALLES,]
Portland, Or.,
Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Victoria,
B. C., all points in British Columbia,
and Alaska, Salem, Albany,
and Roseburg, Or.
PpTÏÏPmhPP That ttie Northern Pacific Railroad
llullluillUul runs the only Emigrant Sleepers
The only Day Coaches, the oniy Pnliman Sleepers
and the only Dining cars between St. Panl and
Portland. Oregon.
Full information in regard to the Northern Pa
cific lines can be obtained tree bv addressing
CHAS. S. FEE/
General Passenger Agent, St. Paul, Mini
RUPTURE
Abnlntelr
cured
in the world.
another*. Purfaet Retainer
Suu
of Hew
»to»
Patent
andlat
V: •
mt
on.
Vi rt
r
B-HS
CURRAN
—DEALERS in
v
AnD ALL KINDS OF GRAIN-FEED.
- ». -----
Ssle Agonts for the cele. rated
FARGO BEST FLOUR
- LIVINGSTON, MONTUR
CORNER OF MAIN AND LEWIS ST.,
Don't
Deceived !
We are selling our goods cheaper
than ever. Can duplicate prices from
any concern in this part of Montana.
We study the markets and buy where
we can get the best goods for fhe least
money. We have just received a car
of Canned Coods via water to Duluth,
and by the case we can give you won
derful prices.
Have you tried a Sack of our "BEST" MINNEAPOLIS FLOUR t
READYMADE CLOTHING way down.
BOOTS AND SHOES made especially to our order..
FURNISHING GOODS coming daily.
Now is the time to buy DRY' GOODS; we must seE way down to make room foj
new goods soon to arrive. Respectfaily.
Thompson Bros.,
Boston Boot & Shoe Store.
HATS! HATS!
Fall and Winter Styles, Just Received, from $1.25 Upwards.
GLOVES AND MITTS,
-AND
UNDERWEAR.
Merrill & Mclnerney.
PROPRIETORS OF
NATIONAL PARK HACK AND EXPRESS
FE0M 0INHABAB TO MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS.
Private Carriages or Saddle Horses Furnished Tourists
at Reasonable Prices.
CINNABAR AND MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS.
JAMES CARROLL,
Sale Sta/ble !
Full Rigs and Saddle Horses on the Shortest Notice.
C^"IIORSES BOARDED BY THF DAY, WEEK OR MONTH.
Horses, Harnesses, Wagons, Baled Hay and Oats bought and sold. Geidle horses tor tl*
use of ladies to be had at a moments notice. Prices reasonable.
Stablecorner C and Lewis Sts., Livingston, Montan*«
CEO. W. METCALF & CO.,
Feed and Sal e Stables,
CORNER MAIN AND CLARK STREETS.
FINEST "TURNOUTS" IN THE CITY.
Tourists and Travelers carried to or from the remotest jxiints with safety and V'F 1
Horses, Mules, Harness and Wagons bought and sold.
Oats and Baled Hav,
Stock boarded by the. day or week. Special attention given to Gentlemen
Terms as reasonable as uny in the city. Call and see us.
Drivers

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