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The daily enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, October 02, 1884, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053382/1884-10-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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Published everyday except Sunday.
.'HEIGHT & HENDRY, ; Pu blishers.
LIVINGSTON, M. T, OCT. 2. 1884
Entered at the postofiice in Livingston, M. T.
a* seeoad-class mail matter.
The |K>stoffice department at Washing
ton has issued an order requiring all mail
messengers employed at money order
offices to be paid by the local postmasters,
instead of by the general office at Wash
ington, as was formerly the custom.
Tiie Miles City Record, speaking of
Alfred Myers' candidacy for office in this
county, says: "Custer county having
furnished the land, including gumbo flats
and Bad Lands which constitute a large
portion of Dawson end Yellowstone coun
ties, is now called upon to supply respon
sible citizens to give social tone to Galla
tin countv."
A. Devine, editor of the Billings Her
ald, was nominated by the democratic
convention to represent Yellowstone coun
ty in the lower house of the legislature.
From a private informant we learn that lie
absolutely declines to accept the nomina
tion, and that the place must needs be
filled by the county committee. John
McGinness, late judge of probate, will
probably be selected. We know nothing
of Mr. Devine's reasons for declining the
nomination, which would surely have
been followed by an election, but they
were doubtless all-sufficient. Yellowstone
county, by his withdrawal, misses the op
portunity of electing an able representa
tive. .
The congressional committee (generally
called Springer's committee) that investi
gated the star route frauds and trials, lias
completed its report ready for presenta
tion when congress reassembles. It de
tails at length the history of the star route
frauds from Hayes' administration down
to the time of the commencement of the
suits, and declares the frauds upon the
service could not have been committed
without the knowledge, co-operation and
assistance of Thomas J. Bradj, and that
not only contractors, but many other per
sons in high official positions in the gov
ernment were either criminally cognizant
of the frauds, or guilty participants there
in. It declares the amount out of which
the government was defrauded in the star
route mail service during Hayes' admin
istration, exceeds four million dollars. At
one time the government was paying
$450,000 per year for carrying mails to
offices that yielded less than $12,000 rev
enue.
GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS.
The Springer committee's report upon
the administration of governmental offices,
particularly those of United States Mar
shals, has been published in part in ad
vance of the meeting of congress. The
preamble, the general statement of what
the report contains, is as follows: "A
stream never rises above its source, and as
long as those who possess the power of
appointing these officers have no apprecia
tion of the true dignity of public service,
and regard offices only as rewards to be
bestowed upon their most unscrupulous
political allies, there is not mucîi reason
to hope for any great improvement in the
character of our appointed officers. The
testimony liefore the committee clearly
shows that utter inefficiency and criminal
practices have prevailed in many parts of
this branch of the public service for many
years past, and that the government has
been a heavy loser thereby. There is a
sameness as also variety in the testimony.
The investigation reveals the wonderful
unanimity with which these officers of
almost every grade aud in several portions
of the country have plundered the public
treasury by false, fraudulent and fictitious
charges, and yet the variety in ways and
means by which they have worked their
schemes is equally curious, and shows
they have taxed their ingenuity to the ut
most to find modes for accomplishing one
unhallowed purpose—getting money to
which they were not entitled. They
charged for arrests not made, for trave
not performed, for expenses not incurred,
for guards not employed; they knowingly
rendered false accounts against the gov
ernment, misappropriated public funds,
became defaulters to the government anc
to the courts; incarnai accounts in the
name of fictitious persons; ärrestec
persons upon false charges, worket
up by themselves; extorted faoney fh>m
private 1 citizens, and ht Ways with
4mt numbe* Müs « spdpdled the
goverameitt ind 'oppressed the people."
Then follows tiie citation of many specific
instances, pMtfciU«r(y. : on the part of mar
■ < I«*'.. ■ - ■■■• ' • J', '- • '•
•T 1 Ä ru ./.w'tw i»>l i. ' fa?
shals in southern states; how they insti
gated baseless, frivolous and vexatious
prosecutions for the purpose of running
up a bill of fees; how deputy marshals
got themselves appointed deputy revenue
collectors, instigated frivolous prosecu
tions under the revenue laws and then
reaped the benefit in the capacity of dep
utv marshals. Russell, marshal of west
ern Texas, was found to have in three
years got away with $40,000 of govern
ment funds beside illegal fees, commit
ted wholesale forgery to defraud the gov
ernment, swindled private citizens, and
destroyed the books of his office to cover
up his criminality. John Hall, marshal of
western Pennsylvania, in nine years re
turned as earned, $33,000, when he had
really earned $180,000. The report says :
"The abuse of the fee system have been
so odius that it is not to be wondered at
that deputy marshals and deputy collect
ors have been shot down as enemies of the
people." Instances are cited of the re
ward, promotion or retention in office of
officials in spite of notoriously illegal
acts, that of Judge Conger of Montana,
being of the list. The report recommends
the abolition of the corrupting fee sys
tem and the fixing of definite salaries for
United States district attorneys and mar
shals, and closes with the statement that
"the investigations have disclosed wanton
waste of the public revenues and crim
inal disregard of the rights and safeguards
of the people."
'•
THE FOOLISH CROWS.
A gentleman whose position gives him
a fair opportunity of knowing tiie feel
ings of the Crows, informs us that the
prospects for a segregation of part of
their reservation this year are not entirely
flattering. Strange as it may seem, the
Crows have opinions of their own, imper
fect though they be. The government
now owes them in the vicinity of $800,
000, and they do not exactly understand
why the amounc should not be paid them.
Last autumn an installment of $30,000
was paid. It was represented by about
1,300 cattle. Those cattle were furnished
under close contract by an Iowa firm.
The conditions were that the cattle were
to be of certain ages. When they were
unloaded at Greycliff many of them were
so poor and weak that they could hardly
stand, and all through the winter they
had to be "killed to save their lives," and
when slaughtered two men could pick up
a carcass and handle it as easily as if it
were the body of a sheep. The contractor
who furnished the cattle fulfilled the let
ter of his contract, the agent necessarily
received them and the secretary of the
Interior doubtless congratulates himself
on the success of his Indian policy. The
survey of the severalty lands in the Big
Horn basin is also charged up to the
Crows, as are also the new agency build
there. The Crows are told that
the Great Father is, by conferring such
substantial benefits, paying them the
amount due them,but they, poor creatures,
are slow 7 to appreciate ail the paternal
indness that is being lavished upon them
and in their councils, with most singular
perversity, keep disputing the advisability
of selling any more of their reservation to
a purchaser that is slow to pay them for
past sales. This feeling is doubtless
chargable to their gross ignorance, but it
nevertheless stands somewhat in the way
of pending negotiations. Another most
nonsensical idea they have conceived is
that the white men in their negotiations
with the Crows are not always fair and
ojien in their language, and not so nicely
scrupulous in fulfilling promises as they
might be They even go so far as to fol
low 7 the idea of Solomon and express in
their blunt language an equivalent for his
famous saying, "all (white) men are liars."
They mean no particular disrespect j the
phrase is merely descriptive and they
would be surprised if any person were
insulted at it. But they believe what they
say and as a consequence are slightly tardy
in accepting, without question, all that is
told them by. government commissioners,
agents, army officers and such high digni
taries who, like the Father of his Country,
could not perpetrate anything partaking
of the nature of a prevarication. . Poor
foolish Crows! If they would only un
questioningly accept what our gracious
government chooses to allow them; if
they would not advance their crude and
imperfect ideas Of the relations of debtor
and creditor; if they would refrain from
closely scrutinizing the details of govern
ment contrafets; if they wouldbear in
mind that a new set of agency buildings
is necessary every two or three years; if
they would remember the eminent suc
cess of oor Indian pol
memorial; if they would permit them
■ \ r ;i 7 Oitf ' ■ ■' * :• ' - ■ ■ J
selves to understand the supreme fairness
and frankness that has always character
ized the dealings of the whites with the
reds; if they would recollect that the
whites have always behaved towards them
with the magnanimity that the victor
should extend to the vanquished; if they
coqld be made to appreciate the fact that
their rulere are in their turn ruled by the
divine native of Bethlehem's manger; if
they would permit themseives to believe
all these things bow happy would be the*
lot, how easy it would be for them to
agree to sell portions of their reservations
and how quickly would they become
wanderers upon the face of the earth
without property or tribal existence, fad
ing into extinction as rapidly as the sun
they revere sinks from the zenith to the
horizon.
' e e -• e o s o o o o o'o o ooooocooo_o
THE CILT EDGE!
F. H. LORING, Prop.,
CHOICEST WINES LIQUORS and CIGARS.
Princely furnished parlor rooms in connection.
BRICK BLOCK MAIN STREET.
SECOND HAND
Printing Office,
Nearly New,
FOR SALE CHEAP
The material consists of one Washing
ton Hand Press, one Pearl Job Press,
with Type, Stones, Etc., in quantity to
suit purchaser. Address,
WRIGHT & HENDRY,
LIVINGSTON, M. T.
Hot, Cold and Shower
Baths at Nick Imo's B
Street Barber shop.
JOHN O. SAXE & CO.,
NEWS AND FRUIT DEALERS,
AND CONFECTIONERS.
The latest eastern Dailies, Illustrated Journ
als and Magazines always on hand.
MAIN STREET.
D M. REESE,
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
STORE FITTING A SPECIALTY.
Plans and Specifications given for any kind
ot work.
Office at the Brunswick Hotel
GOING EAST
OB—
GOING WEST
No matter which, the
IS YOUR LINE,
As it will take yon in either direction between
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, DULUTH,
G LYNDON, MOORHEAD, FARGO,
CASSLETON, VALLEY CITY,
JAMESTOWN. MINNE
WAUKAN,
(DEVIL'S LAKE,) MILNOR, LA
MOURE, BISMARCK, MANDAN,
GLENDIVE, BILLINGS, LIV
INGSTON,
Yellowstone National Part
Helena, IM. T.,
DEER LODGE, BUTTE CITY, MI8SOULA;
SPOKANE FALLS, WALLA
WALLA, THE DALLE8,|
Portland, Or.,
Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Victoria,
B. C., all points in British Columbia,
and Ala^m, Salem, Albany,
and Hoseburg, Or.
That the Northern Pacific Railroad
he only Emigrant Sleepers,
lee? the only PullmanJSleepers
ears between
and
1 to the Northern Pa
1 free by addressing > r
"'•M
H -, :
T* A
V 1
A
CURRAN & LENIHAN
—DEALERS IN— ^
Groceries and
Provisions
AnD A LL KINDS OF GRAIN -FEED. '
Sole Agonts for the cele. rated
FARGO BEST FLOOR!
CORNER OF MAIN AND LEWIS ST., - LIVINGSTON, MONTaj,,
Don't be Deceived!
We are selling our goods cheaper
than ever. Can duplicate prices from
any concern in this part of Montana.
We study the markets and buy where
we can get the best goods for fhe least
money. We have just received a car
of Canned Goods via water to Duluth,
and by the case we can give you won
derful prices.
Have you tried a Sack ot our "BEST" MINNEAPOLIS FLOUR ?
READYMADE CLOTHING way down.
BOOTS AND SHOES made especially to our order.
FURNISHING GOODS coming daily.
Now is the time to buy DRY GOODS; we must sell way down to make room for
new goods soon to arrive. Respectfully.
Thompson Bros.,
Boston Boot & Shoe Store.
HATS! HATS!
Fall and Winter Styles, Just Received, from $1.25 Upwards.
GLOVES AND MITTS,
-AND
UNDERWEAR.
Merrill & Mclnerney
JOB PRINTING
Of All Kinds
PROMPTLY DONE AT THIS OFFICE.
Don't forget us and send East for
yonr Printing. Reduced prices.
JAMES CARROLL,
sŒLd. Sale Stalol® !
Full Rigs and Saddle Horses on the Shortest Notice.
I3TH0RSES BOARDED BY THF DAY, WEEK OR.MONTH.JtQ ^ ^ ^
Horses, Harnesses, Wagons, Baled Hay andOsits bought and sold. GenGe l |rtises
use of ladies to be had at a moments notice. Prices reasonable.
Stable corner C and Lewis Sts.,
Livingston
Montana.
and
Pa
A
CEO. W. METCALF A CO.,
Feed and Sale Stables.
CORNER MAIN AND CLARK STREETS.
FINEST "TURNOUTS" IN THE CD ^
Tourists and Travelers carried toor from the remotest points with *»af* 3
Horses, Mules, Harness and Wagons bought and sole.
Oats arid.Baled.
Stock boarded by the day or week. Sjpectal attention given to Gent e
Terms as reasonable as any in the city. Call and see
I* 7 i ■ >: G '*'• .* a v * I }■ \ ■
1 1\
•a 'ev ■ v G jV' y -Vf.",:

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