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The daily enterprise. [volume] (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, October 27, 1884, Image 1

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VOL. 2. NO. î 24.
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA, MONDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 27, 1884.
Price, 10 Cents*
fl« §8tît}
Published every day except Sunday.
WEIGHT & HENDEY, : Publishers
LIVINGSTON, M. T-. OCT. 27. 1884
TEEMS OF SUBSOBIPTION.
On*' Year, by mail......................... $12 Ou
Six Months, by mail....................... 6 00
Three Months, by mail.................... 3 00
TO CITY SUBSCRIBERS:
By Carrier, every evening.........1.25 per month.
guide Copy..................................lOcts,
Fnr -A) Copies or more...................5cta each.
ADVERTISING RATES:
for standing advertisements, rates will be given
en application. «
Local notices for one insertion only, fifteen
;ents per line. For two or more insertions, ten
cents per line each.
0 ËPERLEY & AYRAULT,
REAL ESTATE, FIRE AND LIFE
INSURANCE.
RIVERSIDE ADDITION.
Correspondence solicited.
Office on Main Street.
g J. CHAMBERLIN,
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE.
—Agent fok Park and Palace Additons
Y our correspondence solicited.
Office on Park Street opposite Depot.
Ç1KORGE IIALDORN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
LIVINGSTON, - - MONTANA
H D. ALTON, M. D.,
—SURGEON,—
N. P. R. R. Co.
Office Main treet, in Dodson building opp. P. O.
JJ B. PERRY,
PHYSICAN AND SURGEON.
LIVINGSTON, - MONTANA.
Leave orders at P. O. drug store.
TJ S. SCOTT, D. D. S.,
DENTIST.
Billings, - Montana.
Fills teeth with Gold and Plastic fillings.
Mounts Artificial teeth on Rubber and Celluloid
anil on the roots of the natural teeth; Solicits
difficult cases and guarantees satisfaction or no
charge.
Anaesthetics administered. Office adjoining
T. R. Mai Ion & Co.'s meat market.
<:. M. Stephens, C. E., U. S. Deputy Mineral Sur.
,1. N. Sn ooumEi>,Mech. and Mining Eng.,Englang
gTEPHENS Jb SIIOOLBRED,
Engineers and Surveyors.
Surveys made in all the mining camps of the
I'pper Yellowstone valley. (Mining district No.
2.) All business promptly attended to. Surveys
and proving patents for claims a specialty.
COOK K
MONTANA.
TAIL P. A. McNULTY,
DENTIST.
All kinds of dental work done.
]Ki8t-oi1'ce.
Office opposite
Bank of Livingston
tTEBBIWS, MUMD & CO.,
Livingston,
dENEKAL
Transacts a
BAN KING
Montant?
BUSINESS.
t'xchiuige on all the principal cities of the
United States and Europe.
Isti'rkst Allowed on TIME DEPOSITS.
Folhrlions made a specialty. Correspond
«lee solicited.
ASSOCIATED BANKS.
Mund & Co , Miles City.
Mehl uns. Mund & Co., Billings.
,, stchbins, Conrad & Co., Buffalo, Wyo'g
Merci ;mtNational Bank, Deadwood, D. T.
Mebbins, Mund A Fox, Central, D. T.
iStelibins, Fox & Co , Spearfieh, D. T.
A L LOVE Cashier.
— THE —
Chicago Milwaukee
& St. Paul
Railway is tin* short line from St. Paul
ail< l Minneapolis, via La Crosse and Mil
"tmkn , to CHICAGO and all points in
R |( ' l *a^tern States and Canada.
IT IS THE ONLY LINE
Lrnl<*r <»n<* management between St. Paul
' !Ul ' ! ( hieago, and is the finest equipped
r aU\\;!v I,, du, Northwest.
IT IS THE ONLY LINE
'Tig Pullman Sleeping cars, Palace
Hi
'Mi t'kiiiw cars and the finest Dining cars in
I " world, via the famous
HIVER BANK ROUTE,
j ; " n " the shores of Lake-Pepin and the
T.Fnl .Mississippi river to Milwaukee
j*! ' ( !:ic:igo. Its trains coqpect with
," N ' ( tin* northern lines in the grand
1111011 at St. Paul.
, NO CHANGE OF
( :in .Y class between
and - * < r , * irou ^H tickets, time tables,
J 1 ' ' u 'i ndorniation Gj>ply to any coupon
J' :, .L r «*nt in t]«* northwest.
h ' s - Mkiuhll,
(
CARS
St Paul and Chi
A. V. H. Carpenter,
I ' lierai Manager. Genl Pass. Agi
[ 1 'LK, G. H. He AFFORD,
Meal Supt. Asst Genl Pass. Agt
. Milwaukee, Wis.
. ih\ 0 N, General Northwestern Pas
n ^ r Agent, St. Paul, Minn.
Ou
00
00
ten
O.
E. J. Chamberlin,
Real Estate and Insurance.
Agent Park, Palace, and Minnesota Additions—AllWithin ten minutes "
walk from Business.
3fc\Æin.m.esota -d^d_cLitio:n.,
Lying on the broad space of level ground adjoining the original townsite on the east,
Has just been platted and lots are now in the market at prices ranging from
$25 to $100,
Convenient to Business and the Railroad Shops. Building has already commenced.
A Liberal Reduction to Parties Improving Property.
Before Irayii Know Vtat Yoa Cas Do.
Residences for sales or rent. Business lots in all parts of the town. Ranches, im
proved and unimproved, ranging from $1,000 to $6,000, on easy terms. Two
ranches suitable for stock business on a large scale. Plats of Gallatin county, east
of the range. Entries made under the homestead,pre-emption,and desert land law.
Xxa.s'u.raoa.ce ! - ■
Six of the oldest and strongest companies doing business, which personal acquaint
ance and experience enables me to endorse. Good policy forms that insure prompt
payment on honest losses.
Office og. Park St., Livingston.
EF
e>
e>
JAS ENNIS&C0.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Butchers!
Game in Season,
POULTRx ,
hklL.......
RANCHERS' ORDERS
-GIVEN
PROMPT ATTENTION.
Orders called for daily and delivered.
N /WOOL and HIDES
©
Brunswick Hotel!
M. C. MURPHY, Propr.
This elegantly appointed and carefully managed hotel is now ready for the reception o
guests Travelers l. ekinc neat and comfortable rooms and a well supplied table will find
themat the BRUNSWICK, opposite | wissen ger depot, Livingston, Montan«
PEASE'S OLD STANJ,
Feed And Sale
TOURISTS CARRIED TO ANY PLACE.
Tne Cheapest and Best Equipped Livery
V. E. SNYDER, P-op.
Democratic Demonstation.
Preparations are being made for the
proper celebration by the people of Liv
ingston of the preseuce in the town of the
eminent democrats now here— Honorables
J. K. Toole, Martin Maginnis and R. P.
Vivion. At 6 o'clock all persons interest
ed in the result will meet at the Rink and
there make up a precession which will
comprise about 125 torch-bearers and
the cornet band. After parading the
principal streets the procession will lead
the way to the Rink again where all that
can get inside the building will be ad
dressed by Messrs. Toole, Maginnis, Viv
ion, Savage, and probably others. It is,
at this writing, expected that a very large
delegation will come over from Bozeman
to attend the meeting.
Important Minins: Transaction.
The Maarinnis Mining company oper
ating at Maiden and which consists
mostly of s. t. Hauser and A. M.
Holter of Helena has lately purchased
three mines at Maiden in addition to
two rich properties they now own in
that district. The mines just purchas
ed are the Kentucky Favorite, Key
stone and Comet—all more or less devel
oped and all bearing gold and silver.
The sellers were Brainerd, Gardner &
Co., and the price realized $100.000. at
which price the mines are considered
cheap. The Maginnis Mining com
pany is putting up a new quartz mill
with which to parry on extended
operations.
Trying: to get the Crow Lands.
Referring again to the report that
a Denver syndicate of stock-growers
is scheming to .secure a long lease of
the Crow reservation as a cattle range,
the Billings Post says: "Further en
quiry tends to confirm the truth of the
report, and to .show that active and
powerful influences are at work in var
ious channels to complete this nefari
ous plot. Members of this syndicate,
powerful in political influence, and
skilled in bringing pressure to bear
where it will do the most good, are
exerting themselves to induce the
powers that be to look ftivorably on
their land-grabbing game. On the
reservation, money is being freely
speni among squaw men, and others
possessing influence over the tribe, to
aid in securing the coryaent of the
Crows to the lease. To f urther this
purpose no means are left untried.
The Crows are being deceived by
skillfully devised falsehoods to look
favorably on the proposed lease, while
their minds are b» ing influenced
against consenting to any portion of
the reservation being thrown open for
settlement." ***"
Stebbins, Mund & Co*« New Building in
Billing«.
From the Billings Herald we make the
following clipping which will be of inter
est to many of our readers because of the
connection of our Bank of Livingston w ith
the Billings establishment: "The direc
tors of the First National Bank of Billings
have accepted the plans for a handsome
block to be erected on Montana avenue
and 27th street. The proposed building
will be built of stone quarried from the
bluffs in the vibinity of town. It will
have a frontage of fifty feet on Montana
avenue and 108 feet on 27th street, and it
is estimated that it will cost at least
$20,000. The windows will be of iron
and plate glass. The basement will con
tain rooms for a barber shop, baths and
other purposes. The corner of the first
floor will be occupied by the bank, the
balance of the first floor being taken up
with a store in the shape of an L. The
second floor will contain eighteen rooms
for offices and will be reached by a stair
wav from Montana avenue.
Tom Cover's Fate.
Thomas W. Cover was on© of the
pioneers of Gallatin county and of
Montana and was for many years a
resident of Bozeman. He was the
sole companion of John Bozeman
when in 1867 that brave pioneer was
killed by Indians a few miles east of
Livingston. Mr. Cover himself suf
fered a slight wound at the time, but
escaped death and carried the news of
Bozeman's death to the people of the
town that bears bis name. Now it
appears that be has himself met a sad
or
see
are
on
the
the
the
for
and
in
the
is
fate. Of late years he has been living
in southern California with his family.
A few weeks ago he went with anoth
er man on a prospecting tour on the
Colorado desert. The two men sepa
rated and agreed to meet again at a
certain rendezvous. Cover at last
accounts had never been seen again.
His companion returned and organized
a party to search for him and the re
sult is not known. It is thought im
probable that he will be found alive
aa he had neither food or water to sus
tain him many days in the desert.
Seriouft Accident.
Yellowstone Journal: Whilst cele
brating the event incident to the con
templated holding of a Democratic
mass meeting at Glendive on Thurs
day evening, an anvil which was being
used instead of a cannon for making
reports, suddenly bursted. L. A.
O'Brien was badly injured, and anoth
er man slightly. The recovery of the
first is said to be a matter of doubt.
Stock News.
Mr. Henry J. Wright of Shield's
river has sold his entire herd of about
600 cattle to a lower Y'ellowstone
strek-grower, whose name we did not
learn. The price realized was $35 per
head for all grades and ages, includ
ing beef steers. The cattle are to be
removed from their present range.
Mr. Wm. M. Wright is preparing to
make a shipment of beef cattle.
Myers Bros., also of Shield's river,
have released the steers they had
rounded up for shipment, as they pre
fer to wait rather than market at
present prices.
About 4.000 or 5,000 sheep in two
bands have been driven upon the
Shield's river pastures this summer
and will winter there. Many think
the range not well adapted to sheep
farming on such a large scale.
Flathead Valley.
Among visitors in town yesterday
were Messrs. Stoddard and Sumner,
partners, who are engaged in farming
and stock-growing un Flathead creek
at the head of Shield's river. From
Mr. Sumner we learn that Flathead
valley is now occupied by as many as
flfty prosperous settlers. Some months
ago they sent in a petition for a post
office on the Livingston and White
Sulphur Springs route to be called
Flathead. The petition was signed by
over eighty persons whom the office
•would have benefited, but for some in
explicable reason the department has
entirely disregarded it so far. It
should certainly be granted as its es
tablishment would involve no extra
expense to the service and is urgently
needed. The nearest offices at present
are Livingston, White Sulphur Springs
or Bozeman, 40 to 60 miles away. The
Flathead settlers also wish to have a
precinct organization of their own.
They particularly wish the appoint
ment <> f a road supervisor who will
see to it that the road tax of that dis
trict is expended in labor for the im
provement of their own roads. They
are also a great distance away from
any polling place—so far that many of
the settlers will forego their fran
chise rather than spend two days in
exerciing it. The board of county
commissioners will doubtless adjust
these difficulties as soon as called up
on to do so. Flathead valley is one ol
the most prosperous settlements in the
county.
Black Hills World: The late rains
which are almost without precedent in
the Black Hills, coming at this time of
year, have started the grass afresh, and
have created some tittle anxiety among
stockmen, who fear the forage may not
cure in as good a state as heretofore when
the autumn months have been dry.
Farmers, however, are benefitted, as the
ground has been kept in good condition
for fall plowing. Early seeding seems to
generally produce the best crops here,
and it is only by having the fields plowed
in the fall that early seeding is made
possible. It is stated by stockmen that
the rains of the past month have not ex
tended out to the Cheyenne, so that the
damage to forage—if damage there be—
is not widespread.

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