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The daily enterprise. (Livingston, Mont.) 1883-1884, October 29, 1884, Image 1

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VOL. 2.
LIVINGSTON, MONTANA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 29, 1884. |
Price, 10 Cents
pf failg ënttKyxi&t.
Published every day except Sunday.
fEIGHT & HENDEY, : Publishers
LIVINGSTON. M. T-, OCT. 29. 1884
teems of subscription.
,, n(1 ypar. by mail ........................$18 00
L MrtnthH, by mail....................... 6 00
Three Months, hv mail.................... 3 00
n ' TO CITY SUBSCRIBERS:
gvCarrier, every evening .........1.25 per month.
single Copy................ 10c ta,
rer'W Copies or more ...................5cts each.
ADVERTISING RATES:
for standing advertisements, rates will be given
Di] ,plication.
Lo< al notices for one insertion onlv, fifteen
yIlt? per line. For two or more insertions, ten
puts per line each.
p£ PE KLEY & AYRAULT,
U REAL ESTATE, FIRE AND LIFE
INSURANCE.
RIVERSIDE ADDITION,
çurrespondence solicited.
Office on Main Street.
I
J. CHAMBERLIN,
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE.
__Agent fob Pabk and Palace Additons
Your correspondence solicited.
Office on Park Street opposite Depot.
r\ EORGE HALDORN,
ur
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
LIVINGSTON, - - MONTANA
I). ALTON, M. D.,
-SURGEON,—
N. P. R. R. Co.
Office Main treet, in Dodson bnilding opp. P. O.
J B. PERRY,
PHYSICAN AND SURGEON.
LIVINGSTON, - MONTANA.
Leave orders at P. O. drug store.
JJ ». SCOTT, D. D. S.,
DENTIST.
Kings, - Montana,
fills teeth with Gold and Plastic fillings.
.Konnte Artificial teeth on Rubber and Celluloid
on on the roots of the natural teeth ; Solicits
dm It cases and guarantees satisfaction or no
dirge.
Anaesthetics administered. Office adjoining
' R. Malian <& Co.'s meat market.
( M. Stephens, C. E., U. S. Deputy Mineral Sur.
IS. Sh eoLBRED,Mech. and Miring Eng.,Englang
JTEP1IENS & SHOOLBRED,
Engineers and Surveyors.
Surveys made in all the mining camps of the
Upper Yellowstone valley. (Mining district No.
All business promptly attended to. Surveys
ud proving patents for claims a specialty.
COOKE
MONTANA.
JJR.C. A. McNULTY,
DENTIST.
All kinds of dental work done.
post-office.
Office opposite
Bank of Livingston
STEBBINS, MUND & CO.,
Livingston,
GENERAL
Transacts a
BANKING
Montan«
BUSINESS.
behänge on all the principal cities of the
United States and Europe.
Interest Allowed on TIME DEPOSITS.
Collections made a specialty. Correspond*
ence solicited.
ASSOCIATED BANKS.
fcWjjM, Mund & Co , Miles City.
Stebbins. Mund & Co., Billings.
„ , Stehbins, Conrad & Co., Buffalo, Wyo'g
Merchants National Bank, Deadwood, D. T.
Stebbins, Mund & Fox, Central, D. T.
Stehbins, Fox & Co , Spearfisb, D. T.
A. L. LOVE Cashier.
— THE —
hicago Milwaukee
& St. Paul
^ilwav is the short line from St. Paul
Minneapolis, via La Crosse and Mil-'
" :| ukei*, to CHICAGO and all points in
t,e eastern States and Canada.
IT IS THE ONLY LINE
one management between St. Paul
^ Chicago, and is the finest equipped
railwa y in the Northwest,
j.. .IT IS THE ONLY LINE
^nnning Pullman Sleeping cars, Palace
cars and the finest Dining cars in
i( w °rkl. via the famous
RIVER bank route,
the shores of Lake Pepm and the
*'! ut,fn I Mississippi river to Milwaukee
^ Chicago. Its trains connect with
v 0 °f the northern lines in the grand
100 He pot at St. Paul.
Jf NO ( HANGE OF CARS
°I ass between St Paul and Chi
For through tickets, time tables,
. information apply to any coupon
i . (, a KAiit in the northwest.
"-»«■KILL.
. General Manager.
Flark,
V. H. Carpenter,
Genl Pass. Agi
r G. H. He AFFORD,
^ nl Supt. Asst Genl Pass. Agt
i t, Milwaukee, Wis.
• Hixon, General North western Pas
Agent, St. Paul Minn.
00
00
00
ta,
ten
O.
E. J. Chamberlin,
Real Estate and Insurance.
Agent Park, Palace, and Minnesota Additions—AllWithin ten minutes
y
walk from Business.
Lying on the broad space of level ground adjoining the original townsite on the east
Has just been platted and lots are now in the market at prices ranging from
$25 to $100,
Convenient to Business und the Railro&d Shops. Building has already commenced.
A Liberal Reduction to Parties Improving Property.
Before tarns. Know lat Yon Can Do.
Residences for sales or rent. Business lots in all parts of the town. Ranches, im
proved and unimproved, ranging from $1,000 to $6,000, on easy terms. Two
ranches suitable for stock business on a large scale. Plats of Gallatin county, east
of the range. Entries made under the homestead,pre-emption,and desert land law.
Six of the oldest and strongest companies doing business, which personal acquaint
ance and experience enables me to endorse. Good policy forms that insura prompt
payment on honest losses.
Office on Park St., Livingston.
E 3 F
mmmmm
JAS. ENNIS & CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Butchers!
Game in Season,
FOTJXiTP,
Vegetables, Bitter, Eggs, Etc.
RANCHERS' ORDERS
-GIVEN
PROMPT ATTENTION.
Orders called for daily and delivered.
<&
OOL and HIDES
Brunswick Hotel!
M. C. MURPHY, Propr.
in ted and carefully managed hotel is now ready for the reception o
guests Travelers Peking neat and comfortable rooms and a well supplied table will find
BRUNSWICK, opposite passenger depot, Livingston, Montan«
This elegantly a]
Travelers l.
themot the
PEASE'S OLD STANJ,
Feed And Sale Stable.
. • : .
TO URISTS CARRIED TO ANY PLACE
The Cheapest and Best Equipped Livery in Town.
! Y. E. SNYDER, Prvp.
hi. . :»
'Tit 1 ,' '
In
m
Maguire's Meeting.
About fifty or sixty persons assem
bled in Fowlie's 'nail last evening to
listen to Jmige H. N. Maguire. The
audience would doubtless have been
considerably larger had the night not
been very chilly and the hall un
warmed. The Judge spoke for about
one hour and a half. He announcec
in the beginning that he would be
somewhat egotistical, and he did not
break his promise. He told how
some nineteen years ago he
visited every farm and hamlet
in the Gallatin valley urging
contributions of provisions for the use
of the expedition sent out to drive
back the Indians and thus break down
the eastern barriers of the territory to
prepare the way for regular military
campaigns, for the Northern Pacific
railroad and the settlers that accom
panied it. He related how when but
a beardless lad h wrote the first edi
torial ever published on the Pacific
coast advocating a northern transconti
nental railroad through what was then
a savage wilderness from the Great
Lakes to the Walla Walla valley. He
mentioned incidentally that he had
obtained the investment of $300,000 in
the Black Hills and $70,000 in Gallatin
county and that the whole western
country had been benefited to a greater
or less extent by his labors. Two
chief planks there were in bis platform
—the bridling of the sinister influence
of the Northern Pacific rMIroad and
the reduction of the fees of county
officers. In reply to a question as to
how; he stood on the county division
question he replied that be believed it
the inherent right of the people
of this poTtion of Gallatin coun
ty, if they thought their inter
ests would be subserved and they
could afford the additional ex
pense, fcabe formed into a new coun*
ty of this territory. He believed it
the principle of trué republicanism or
of true democratic government that
every community have the right to
manage its local affairs instead of "be
ing governed in such details by an ad
ministration removed from them.
The speaker called out loud applause
by strongly advocating the election of
Miss Hamilton as superintendent of
schools. He did not neglect reference
to his independent candidacy and can
vass for the office of probate judge—
his admission as a practicihg lawyer,
his record when he held the office be
fore and his desire for election. He
assured those present that might be
deterred from voting for him by the
fear of losing their votes that they
did not stand in that danger so much
as they might think.
Death of a Great Editor.
Wilbur F. Story, proprietor of the
Chicago Times, died in that city on
Monday night. Mr. Story was the
greatest of western newspaper men;
few in the world have been his equals.
His early newspaper experience was
in Detroit, Michigan, and fiom there
be came to Chicago and took charge of
the Tiroes, then an ius'gnificant paper
and a bankrupt property. That was
some time in the Fifties. He shortly
became it? proprietor as well as its
editor, and in a little time had made
it the greatest newspaper west of New
York, a position which it maintained
as long as be was mentally able to con
trol it. He had an enormous capacity
for work and he devoted himself en
tirely to the Times. The minutest de
tails, not only of the editorial work
but of the business management, re
ceived his constant attention. That
the smallest item of Chicago news did
not get into the paper was the signal
for a lecture to the whole editorial
and reportorial force of the paper.
He was feared rather than loved, but
his force and ability were always ad
mired. The terrible task to wbieb be
devoted himself had the inevitable re
sult of breaking bis mind and for some
months past he has been insane. A
young wife whom he married a few
years ago, within a few weeks brought
his infirmities into prominence by liti
gation to secure a conservator for his
estate in which she was successful.
In Wilbur F. Story a great
his
a
of
of
h
Cabinet Chang«.
Walter Q. Gresham, secretary of
the treasury, has been appointed
United States circuit judge to succeed
Judge Thomas Drummond, who pre
sided over the district in which Chi
cago is situated. Gresham is succeed
ed in the treasury department by
Hugh McCulloch. Judge Gresham
was formerly postmaster-general, and
took the treasury portfolio about a
month ago. It was then generally un
derstood that he was to hold it but
temporarily, and was ultimately des
tined for a U. S. judgeship. He was
judge of court in Indiana, when ap
pointed postmaster-general.
Coal Land« of the Northwest
At the meeting of the National
Academy of Sciences at Newport, R.
I., Prof. R Pumpelly, who had charge
of the survey of the country along the
Northern Pacific in 1881, read a paper
on the Mesozoic coals of the north
west. The coals in Washington Terri
tory, Northern Montana, Idaho,
Oregon and Dakota are all cretaceous,
from the top of the Laramie forma
tion down. From the Missouri river
west to the Rocky Mountains, the
coal layers are thirteen to sixteen feet
thick, but are lignitic and crumble
on exposure. West of that the
layers are two to six feet thick, but
are bituminous coking coals. In Ju
dith basin, up to or past the British
line, are coking coals from eigh
teen inches to five or six feet thick»
The next great coal fields are west of
the Cascade range. Here the thick
ness of carboni ferous formations is at
least 13,000 feet. All the bituminous
coal has been studied, but not yet thfe
lignite, which is less valuable. Somo
of these coals have been converted in
to a natural coke, having the same*
chemical composition as anthracite.
The bituminous coal is confined to
strips along the Cascade range and
Vancouver's island. The total
amount of carboniferous material is.
very great. The coal fields of Wy-,
oming territory have no representative
in the north.
In prosecuting his business Mr. Allan
Pinkerton made it his inflexible rule never
to operate for rewaids or on payments
contingent upon success, and would never
allow any of his operatives to receive any
reward or gratuity for their services. He^
paid his employes liberally, and worked
for those who engaged him at a certain
fixed sum per diem, which was all that
was ever received. Another notable and
praiseworthy feature of his immense bus
iness, and one of the strictest rules of his
institution, was that he never, under any
circumstance, could be induced to operate
in a divorce case, or where family matters
were in dispute. In following out this
line of conduct he flatly refused many
thousands of dollars annually. It was.
also a principle with Mr. Pinkerton that
the old maxim of "setting a thief to catch
a thief" was morally wrong and unwise in
action, and that taking two men
of the some mental calilier, the one
guilty and the other innocent, the
latter would invariably prevail over the
mental and moral nature of the former.
A. E. West lost his life in a mine
tunnel at Cable by being smothered
by foul gas arising from a blast.
It is stated that on Tuesday at La Cleu,
Belgium, an attempt was made to shoot
King Leopold. One shot was fired at him
by a radical student.
Circulars have been sent to the govern
e
ors of all the states and territories in the
Union requesting each to appoint one del
egate at large to the National Cattle Men's
convention to be held at St. Louis No
vember 17, 1884.
One of the largest singie contracts ever
made by the British government was that
awarded to Armour & Co. of Chicago,
or 1,000,000 pounds of canned com
lieef and 1,000 cases of bacon, for the
army in Egypt. It is stated that half the
contract was fulfilled by delivery at
Woolwich, Within an hour after the order
was given, and on the same day the rest
of the beef started from Chicago by fly
freight tnda to New York.
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