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The times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1897-1901, March 14, 1897, PART 2, Image 17

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THE MORNING TIMES, SUNDAY, MARCH 14, 189T
17
1 f?svwi.-l
Tin: ''Handbook of the New Library ot
Congress," winch has just been iBMied by
Curtis & Cameron, of Boston, is u very
iiiterotitiK little book, which is not only
u guide, but a houvenir of the beautiful
liuihlinK with wliich it deals. It is compiled
liy Herbert Small, and contains-e.if-ays by
Mr. Charles Carfin and Librarian Suofford.
.3t is fr"ely illuMrated, reproducing all of
the more important worksof urtandaichi
lecture, and many of the minor one-, with
lnict de.NCiiptions of each The pictures
of thi' ethnological heads which ornament
the keystones of the windows are epe
Ually fine, as also the view- or the rotunda
and of many of the statues.
Perhap-. the work done by American
artists ;a the World's Fair was the firt
intimation to the world at lui ge that Amer
ica could really excel in the lines of archi
tectural decoration. The IJoston I'ubhe
lAhnmy followed thl c with its lich and
varied tieaMires, but the Congressional
Ltbratry i in some ways a realization
of Che dreams awakenedby t he "White City
The nation may well be proud of it. The
-work of these artist is thoroughly Amer-ii-wii.
an outgrowth of our national life.
Cvery visitor to Washington, and every
resident of "Washington, especially, should
study the big buildinjr thoroughly, and in
this study, Mr. Small's hand-bok will
lie of much service. It is net bulky enough
to overload an overcoat pocket, yet it is
lxrge enough to give due space to the
art treusuics of the Library.
Sir. Jhimus lJeaumont Soyas, lately Well
knwwn in Washington as the Private Seo
i entry or Congressman Sloise, happens
to be in town lepiesenting Curtis A Cam
eron, who have just issued the "Hand
book of the Congiessitmnl Library " Mi
Kyv- personally presented a. copy of
this wnk to President McICinley the other
tin v.
Who isCharles&iarrington? Peihapsthe
reader will answer that ifcia our province to
answer questions, and not to ask them
He is the author of "Lady Uramber'.s
VJjtrostV and 'A Sturdy Beggar," accord-
ing t CWw title pages'of Stone &. Kimball's
recent bJcS None of the back numbers of
the literary iXapers, weekly or monthly,
reveal anything jjf him, so, in picking up
tne Lady Bnmiber book I had to "go it"
Wind.- A style of -aijparently ordinary ex-
ItreMiveness soon disclosed considerable
xie.d nex- and aciua".bjrilliancy.
Tne -writer is a hritiiier.and the matter
of the e.irly pages ia j insularly English
that 1 regretted the lWaste 0f so ntueli
evident rtcx-erness on white possessed so
little readth of appeal. Forthwith, how
ever, .Mr Charrington jrtunged into the
I'rogresMon of a stron;i dramatic story
The iheme desls witjvthe brilliant liter
tiry himI drainatic-a'chieveinoiits of Lady
Itramber. J'Vd the apparent literary thefts
uf a Tiwtn in gray. The Inverse or this is
tlie fact. and in working out the threads to
:i .sequential and surprising finish Mr. Char
- ringtoM proved liimself tvlnit the literary
papers h.ve not bruited loudly, nor have
the digmried encyclopaedias yet discov
crvd-a promising writer with the gift of
invention, polished with no inconsiderable
degree of stylie capabilities The most Mg
xutiUHNt result of reading this ft! at storj--ivas
the immediate inclination to take up
the ot1er.
-The Sfurdy Beggar"' is measurably
dis!iipjinting. It should have been lead
Iwfore the other and the delight afforded
Ijv Mr Charrington would have been
cre.seeant. The beggar in question is a
bralptoi and the book recites such trials
as Hie apt to i-onie into an artist's career
begiming. The accounts of the vicis-himd-s
of the statue of Prudence are told
with a lively wit, but there is a falling
off r interest in what follows. Decidedly,
"Ladv l$ramlcr's Ghost" is the better
ieik if the two. But either is -worth
the candle, and both of them stimulate
MHJiitviest in what this author may give
us next He is no tvro ?oine account
or him would be relished by whoever reads
Ids tories.
, "Make Believe" is a pretty name for a
tiieee of fiction. H. D. Lowry has utilized
it Tim- a number of sketches of children,
really child phantasys. They are child
Blttries ri lug people. They possess all
the grace and eloquence of maturity; all
the ingenuousness and imagry of the ju
veniie mind. The heroine of all this
iiwke-heheve is Doris, though a better title
tor her is mteilocutor, for tne stories are
the S"ci.t. siie tells her visitor. Charles
Robinson lends the light lines or his ar
tistic Taney to the illumination of the
ji:tge-t. There is something character
istically cl.ild-suggestive in his drawing,
though it is sometimes less meaningful,
or even decorative, than other illus
trators. Soon from the Bodly Head will
come another book of Mr. Lowry "s, ma&.
Ing "The Happy Exile."
The eventful book of last week was "The
Children." One of its claims to distinc
tion is that it is the first book to be
published by Will Bradley's Wayside Press,
the other is that It convs fresh from the
Irmlful mind and pen or Mrs. Alice iley
xiell. For Mr. Lane and Sir. Bradley there Is
every congratulation for the visual dis
tinctiveness of the little duodecimo. It is
jirepa ied wit h every care a net chaste adorn
ment which sapient taste could give. The
text isc'ear as If made from platinum type-Xac-e,
and the embellishments are artistic
to a decree.
Airs. Sleynell wc know well. She might
e called the Agnes Bepplier of England.
3vspecially the present book arid Miss Kep
plier'.s ivcent plea for the literature of im
ngtnaUvc children seem to place these tivo
jciOcd women on the same plane of sensitiveness-
and sympathy where the iittlp
one6, arc discussed. In her latest book Sirs,
ileynell displays anew those gifts of per
ception and discernment which individual
ize hVr prost- writings. Coupled with them
Ere her originality, the happy fruition of
ixperience sened by memory and the
fersonal charm -which illumines her pages,
houcli it speaks from between the lines.
"The Children" are discussed pleasantly
Bd seiiUently through eighteen short es
ays on child habit, character, humor, weak
ness and sweetness. It is not less subtle
than Sirs. Sleyuell's best other writing, ami
)tis more winning in the sympathy of the
subject and the individual charm impart
ed by the author.
One of the last books to issue from the
press of the Scrihners during February
was an anonymous volume of a French
UiaiCs impulsions of America and Ameri
cans, us and ours. Tertians the example
of other foreign commentators encouraged
liim to "write, but cautioned him to anony
mity Dickens drew down resentment as
cell jiMMMBMiHbc was adversely
critical, and, as for the present -writer's
compatriot, Max O'ltoll, he has set a
precedent of bpiiitcdwit wliich few could
duplicate. Between the trodden path of
waggery and the unceitaiu ways of re
tailing truths of things which exist,
which we know exist but dislike to be
reminded of, then was no choice. A new
line was thu only alternative. Such has
our new fiiend taken.
It is hard to believe that these thought
ful pages, reflections of observing ejes,
often illuminated with wit, seldom stu
dious, came casually from a rralernal pen
for a Mater's diary I u doubting tne writer,
I mean only to compliment his writings.
It is all much too good for that. The bo.k
may not achieve a tithe of the succeos of
Monet's works, but it is evidently sincere
and truthful, it is written giacefully and
graciously, and It affords us tenewed op-
portunities for the gratillcalioii of one of
our national weaknesses to see ouiselves
as others see us.
The wurtei found it difficult to render a
totality of his impiessions of what is dis
tinctly American, for a-s husays: "Lynching
is American in South Carolina, but it is not
American in Boston atleastnotslnce 1SG0
or thereabouts; to go to dinner or to the
theater, with one's back and bosom bare,
is American in New York, but such a dis
play in Bavenpoit would render the of
fender liable to arrest, or at any rate
certain of social condemnation; to babble of
.Stendhal, Ro.vtti, and Browning Is Ameri
can In Chicago, while it would be simple
lunacy in "Bloody Gulch " Yet two
things impiessed the writer with positlve
ness: The prevalence of the social dis
content which stirs Europe a ud a strange ex
clusion of the more cultivated from their
proportionate share or authority and responsibility-and
governing m.ichinery. And
what apology can we make foi the latter
sad truth?
A gentle dignity and certain excellence
charactcnzes neaily everj page to which
Sir. Lauienee Button puts his pen. His
n.ost recent hooks of sigiuiicantimpoitance
have been "the literary Landmarks" se
ries. In these sympathetic pilgiimages
he has visited Venice, Jerusalem, London
and Edinburgh , and now he points out for
us the literal landmarks of Floience. The
Itahancity is lich In mateiial for Mr. Hut
ion's embellishing style. There are the
homes or tombs of Dante, Eoccacio. Savona
lola, Galileo. Walter Savage Landor and
Loth the Brownings.
Mr. Hut'tO'i haswnade another book which
is no lef-.s a delight to the traveler, whose
itinerary is t oi.nded bj his library shelves,
than to the tourist, who seeks the landmarks
of these literary lights in the heart of
rioience itself. Polished concentiation,
(oupled to a scrupulous exactitude, seems
to he the chief merit of these volumes of
landmarks, tlough inpiaislng the author's
taste in f Loosing and arranging his facts,
one must noL forget the excellence of his
taste i.or his. prodigality in illuminating
his text with illustrations The Harpeis
have been generous to Mr Button, and to
his readei s, in the formal embellishments of
his Look.
The Harpers made auother ccnliibution
tins moiiLh to the literature of cliivalry and
adventure whichsustainsits-popularity with
remarkable vigor for a mere fad. With the
propitiation of such writers as ntyraan,
Hopc,-Craiie, Parker, and I a in inclined to
add Kcightley. there is rational accounting
for its sustaiument and even perpetuity. S.
II. Kleightley is the author of "The Cav
aliers," "The Crimson Sigu" ami of the re
cently published, "Thu Last Recruit of
Clare's," which last is made up or passages
Troni the memoirs of one Anthony Dillon,
chevalier of Sc. Louis and late colonel of
Clare's Kegimont in the service of France.
These memoirs yield live engaging stories
of adventure and valor They are wiitten
with, the graces 'and the tricks of style
which distinguished Mr. Kcightley as a
writer of admirable resources in his earlier
stories. They cannot add anything to the
reputation orthe author of "The Cavaliers"
or "The Crimson Sign," but they confirm
his ability and originality and hold out
confidence in a continuation of the obliga
tion to him under which he has placed his
readers. This book is likely to stand as
merely episodical in the story of hisliterary
achievements. but it is only less eminent
!)Of"iuse of comparison with his other su
perb romances.
It remained for Sfaria Louise Pool to
express, to biing even into literature,
what we have so long recognized in our
friends, the dogs, the'r intelligence, af
fection, fidelity, pathos and humor. The
dog is an intimate element in most of
our lives, a party to neaily every house
hold, and the certainty with which each
of these dumb brutes has bound himself
to our arrections is the certainty of the
pleasure to be found in the book which
Stone & Kimball have published for
Sliss Pool, it Is called "Boss, and Other
Dogs." Boss i the licit) of the first of
the many stories The other canines are
interesting bmtes of various types. Slaje
was the companion and friend of a
cripple peddler. When the Inevitable day
came that brought him to the poorhou.se,
Maje nearly stood between him and en
tering, but as matters very prettily turned
out they both went in together. The
meeting of Laddie, a stray collie, with
the farm dogs and what happened is an
other charming piece of appreciative
canine chronicling. .JIlss Pool shows an
extensive acquaintance with her dog
friends and a deep sympathy inevitably
bred of this knowledge. The book more
readily appeals to women, for it deals
almost exclusively with the sentimental
side of dog life, but the author probably
intends to write another book Avith the
sagacity of the hunter and the prccority
of the dog humorist for her topic.
It is needless to say that the new pcri
odcial which Philadelphia is about to
send abroad under the alluring- name,
"The "Yellow Dog," is a magazine of
the freak type. The decadents wi ll probably
raise their voices in jubilant admiration
ot this latest feat of nomenclature while
the Philistines rend their garments and
cry, n advance, for the literary dog
catcher to muzzle this faddish mongrel.
The romance called "Glamour," by the
queerly named MetaOrrecl(Lippincott), has
become a prevailing dinner-table topic.
Since I'oe and Monk Lewis no writer has
had a more powerful command of the
grewsome In fiction. The author's -eal
name has not been revealed.
The Emperor Francis Joseph has made
the poet. Maurus Jokai, a life member
ot the Hungarian House of Magnates.
MRRILLR M,
Candidate Pnn IWKnJntnn in Hnlnml-iio S
"It President McKluley favors my ap
pointment and the Senate concurs I shall
be the first woman ambassador."
This Is whatt MurJUo. Marks Kicker, the
well-known woman lawyer of Washing
ton and Dover, N. II., says. She Is a
candidate for the office or euvoy extra
ordinary and minister plenipotentiary to
the United States of Colombia, the position
wliich Is now filled by Luthei McKinney,
Manchester, N. H, Sirs. Kicker's petition
or application has been placed lu the hands
of President SlcKinley. She writes:
'It does not seem to me a remarkable
request to be appointed envoy extraordi
nary and minister plenipotentiary There
is nothing in the Constitution of the United
States prohibiting a woman's appointment.
ArticletJ, section 2 of the Constitution of
the United States defines the power of
the President in that direction.
"That platform adopted by the national
Republican convention at St. Louis, SIo.,
June 18, 18IK, says: 'The Republican
party is mindful of the lights and interests
ot women. Piotectlou of American Indus
tries includes equal opportunities, equal
pay for equal work, and protection to the
home. We favor the admission of woujeu
to wider sphcresof usefulness, and welcome
their co-operation in rescuing the country
from Democrat ic and Populistic misman
agement, and misrule '
"1 assisted j n rescuing the country from
Cleveland mismanagement. Now I want
and ask for'a Wider spheie of usefulness.
x&roSgv
v) jjUHiUHarv ' f
KJ
Oooooo
II rs.
Mnrillu Murk Hlekor, Who Has Petitioned President McKluley
to Ho Made MiniMer to Colombia.
That is, I ask to be appointed envoy ex
traordinary and minister plenipotentiary
to the United SUites of Colombia.
"1 sent my application to the President
elect, and there are no national or state
laws prohibiting niyappointment. 1 toerui
to mo that we can truthfully say there is
no gender in brain and it Is time to do
away with the silly notion that there Is.
Every student of English law knows that
statutes ImpoMiig penalties are to be strict
ly construed so as to Include everybody and
thing not -within their letter. Statutes
creating- privileges, eonferiing benefits,
are to be liberal construed so as to in
clude every person within the leach of
their spirit.
"We have reached a peiiod when women
are to have the benefit of both these
rules to correlate each other. Mauy have
said to me that there is no piecedent for
appointing a woman ambassador 1 cply,
the United States of America can estab
lish precedents and make history
"I ask for the place because I think the
time has come when women should le
recognized in the diplomatic circle, and
because I believe I have ability and
strength of character enough to warrant
my appointment. The world shall know
that one woman at least has courirae enough
to undertake a line or work hitherto thu
exclusive prerogative of men.
"I know that J could learn to speak
Spanish in a very shoit time, for I al
ready speak German and Italian and a
little French. Ilinvebeen in Euiope twice,
once in 1872, when I stayed for two
years, and then in 1889, returning in
1890. At first L thought of asking to
be appointed minister to Germany, but
thought better of it. I like a warm cli
mate, and South America would suit me."
"L have been a woman suffragist ever
since I can remember, and it was my
greatest trouble when a child that I could
not go to town meeting witn my father,
while my brother, who was only six years
older, could. I do not icmernber when I
did not have a wish to vote. I have a nat-
ural love for polities. My father always
held that a woman was just as good as a
man, and a little better, andthattheiewas
no reason ia the world why women ought
not to vote.
"I am going to have a good following
among the business and professional wo
men's clubs throughout the country. If
Mr. Harrison had been elected four years
ago I would haveasked him for an appoints
mentttien. Some 'women think that I
should have asked for ji moie impoitant
mission, but I did not think best, though I
have tho legal and political ability. There
are many women who can undoubtedly fill
such a position as that for which I have
applied, but thoy simply have notnsked for
it. Ot course, I know that the position is
much sought for by men, for there is a
chance for making money there. Besides,
the salary is $10,000, though the German
ministry pays $17,500. I should think
that my record would surely entitle me to
recognition, for I have done hard work
for the Republican party in this and in the
preceding campaigns.
Mrs. Kickers career has been a biilliant
one. She was boin in Dm ham, N- II., in
1840, being the daughter of Jonathan B.
andllannaji Young. Aftergraduatingfrom
thepublicschoolsandXe'.v London Academy,
shataughLschoolJ'or a while, and then came
j.he time so dear to the hcaituf. all young
women , whether or no they will confess it
the days of." courtship and marriage. The
fortunate man in this instance was John
r Rickcr.
Since her husband's death Mrs. Bicker
hassLndled law faithfully and to excellent
purpose. Her preceptors weic Washington
attorneys of high icputation. She is per.
mitted to practice before the supreme
courtof theDistiictof Columbia, and when
she gained admission she stood first of the
class of nineteen who competed lor the
honor. Her classmates were all men.
Later she was appointed United States
RIGKBR,
r ur jvmiiOLOL lu uuiuuiuia
commissioner and' examiner In chancery
by the supreme court of Jhe'Dlstrict.
In 13QU Mrs. Kicker made applica
tion. Cor admission to the bar of New
Ilampshiie. She was the first woman
to apply for that honor, and the most
rooted opposition appeared against
her. Finally the matter, was. taken
before Chief, Justice Doe, aim to the
amazement of the legal fraternity, the"
justice decided that there was no legal
leason why a lady should not be ad
mitted to practice.
In appearance Mrs. Kicker Is tall,
"spate," and slightly Inclined to the
masculine. Her features, arc strong
and marked. She bus a long, straight
nose, Her hair, cut short, curls tight
to her head, While she barely looks fifty
the ungallnnt trutft is that she Is nearer
sixty. Her favorito gown is close fit
ting and of dark material, adorned
with Inrge flowers and trlmmod wltli
lace.
"SIARILLA M, IUCKER.''
BOUGHT A HOTEL "W1TIL STAMPS
They Were the BcKiilt of Twenty
Years' Collecting Worth 835,000.
When Byron S. Ross begun to collect
postage stamps twenty years ago he was
called a crunk by his schoolmates. His
parents tried to dissuade him from, what
thoy thoughl was a foolish craze. He told
O
his father that some day his stamps would
bring, him a fortune.
His dream has come true. A few days
ago Mr. Ross traded hiscollectlonof stamps
for a hotel at Hurley, Wis., valued at
$8.",000. He uuu now laugh at tho-e who
twentj years ago called him a crank. Mr.
Ross left for Huley last night to take
charge of the hotel which was purchased
with postage stamps. He bought the prop
erty from John E. Burton, a mine owner,
who is gilng to establish his son in the
postage stamp business.
This is perhaps tho first time in history
that a deul of such magnitude was made
with postage stamps. The Bardon house,
which Mr Ross has bought, is one of the
best known hotels In Wisconsin. It was
built a lew years'ago by Mr. Burton, who
is the owner of several mines in thevicin
ity of Hurley. It h js eighty rooms and has
always had a good patronage.
Mr. Ross knows nothing about the hotel
business, but he is confident of making-it
a success He says any man who can make
money out of postage stamps ought to be
successful as a hotel-keeper.
It took about 3,000,000 stamps to buy
the hotel. Mr. Burton and his son spent
several days in counting them. After they
had counted $35,000 worth, Mr. Ross
still had his private and foreign collection
left.
For several years Mr. Ross had' been the
largest dealer In canceled stamps in Chi
cago. He was a mail-carrier for ten years,
and this gave him unusual advantage for
making ids collection
He has bought and sold many millions
of American and foreign stamps. His col
lection, which he traded for the Hurley
Hotel. Is considered one ot the largest m
the United States. He had stamps ranging
in pricef rom 10 cents a thousand to $1,500
for one.
Mr. Ross had the largest foreign corre
spondence of any man in Chicago. He fre
quently received as high as 300 letters a
day from Europe. His name was known In
the remotest parts of the world. He has
seutmillllonsof stamp3to Japan and Chin i,
where small fortunes are spent in decorat
ing rooms with them. Persons who dealt
with him thought he must certainly know
everybody in Chicago. He has received let-
betters from all parts of the globe making
inquiry for this or that person supposed to
be in this city. During the World's Fair a
letter was sent from Siberia in his care
KERNANS
MATlISEliS TUESDAY, TJ
'A Brilliant Deluge o
MATlIMSliS TUESDAY,
"A Brilliant Deluge
IRWIN
B
In- Conjunction
URLESQUERS
BIO SPECIALTY COMPANY.
Introducing
a Meritorious Aggregation oC Eminent Burlesque Stars and, high-class
Vaudeville Artists, including the
5-BARRISOH SISTERS-5
An accurate reproduction. The same, novel, sensational act as performed at
ItOFter & Bial's, New York.
.MAM.L1AXIA.N COMEDY FOUR,
America's Greatest Quartet;.
XtUwAlU) mm j&I-MRSOX,
Oiigiuators of Illustrated Songs.
DAJSE and 11AG,
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30-PRETTY, SHAPELY,
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Next iveek-SAlL T. JACK'S- COMEA
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LAFAYETTE SQUA
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NEXT WEEK-
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
RETURN OF THE FAVORITE FOR A FAREWELL VISIT,
LAST OPPORTUNITY TO SEH
THE
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Presented in All Its Realism by Every flodern Aid of Scenic and Electrical Surroundings.
KKGUI.AJB KVKN1NG PKICKS.
MATINEE PRICES: Orchestra, 75c; Balcony, 50c; Family Circle, 25c.
JESSKfSStSa'U SARDOU'S "SPIRITISMS"
to a man who was visiting Chicago. The
writer of the letter had no doubt that Mr.
Ross could find the person ror whomit was
intended. And so he did, through the Rus
sian, consul.
Mr, Ross had been selling stamps for the
last five years to Mr. Burton's mjh, who
bus aulte a reputation as u philatelist.
The young man was anxious to go Into
the business on a large scale and the rather
consented.
"It I can trade the Bardon house for a.
collection of stamps," said Mr. Burton,
sr., "t will set you up in biiHlneos. Bring
me a stamp dealer and I will talk trade
with him."
Young Mr. Burton corresponded with
Mr. Ross, and the deal was consummated.
About two weeks ago Mr. Burton and his
son came from their home at Lake Geneva
and the counting of stamps was begun.
They worked late and early, and when
they had counted $35,000 worth they
quit Anexpress wagon was piled high with
the stumps that Mr. Burton took to liia
home in Lake Geneva.
Herald.
-Chicago Times
Mr. Iliinna JJoe.Mi't Mailayo Him.
In selecting his Cabinet, President Mc
Kinley followed his own heat. There
uie two or three conspicuous instances ot
the self-reliance which led him to dis
regard the wlshe-j even of Mr. Hauna.
Much as Mr.McKinley likes Hanna, grate
ful as he was to him, eager as he was to
please him, at least two Cabinet appoint
ments urged by the national chairman,
and persistently urged, too, werenot made.
So It has been with a number ot appoint
ments to the diplomatic service. It Is
only Justice to Mr- Hauna to say that
he bus made no effort to manage things
cither at Canton or here in Washington.
Chicago. Times-Herald.
Clniin Has So Stiindhij;.
Joseph Smolinski, of Xo. GIG Sixth
street northwest, was notified by the
Commissioners yesterday that the claim
had by his father, Gen Joseph Smolinski,
against tho District for contract work
under the old Board of Public Works, no
longer has any standing in court. The
District appropriation act of Marcli 3,
1397. repeals the act of February 13, 1895,
and provides that all proceedings there
under pending shall Iuj vacated.
AMrSKMJSNTS.
The Wonder.
The Sensation.
THE
Crystal Maz
427 7th Street N. W., near E Street
Admission - -
15c
The greatest success of any at
traction that ever came to "Washing-ton.
A CADC5IV Prices S5, r,0, 75c anil SI 00
Weil. nndS.it. Main. 25 and 50c rcs'tU
FRANK HARVEY'S STERLING DRAMA,
The LAND
Of the LIVING.
Full of heart interest and eifacted by an
excellent cast, headed by the
favorite actor.
FRANK KARRINGTON.
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THE SCIENTIFIC LECTURES
DELIVERED EVERY HOUR FOR
MALE ADULTS ONLY.
Open Dailvfrom 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.
loc. ADMISSION loo.
SPECIAL OUR STAY IS A SHORT ONE.
FRIDAY, from 1 to 0 p. m., FORLA1UES
ONLY. mhl-i-7t
LAFAYETTE OUAISK OPKKA. IIOII.hE.
Week Beginning Monday, March 22.
Diiect from the
Knickerbocker Theater, New York,
Victorian Sardou's
Lntes-t and Best Play,
SPIRSTISftiE
Managementof Al Dayman and Charles
Frohman.
With its enormous cast, including: Mau
rice Barrymoru, J. H. Gilmour, Win. F.
0ven. Theodore Roberts, Charles Uar
bury, George Finite. Milton Lipman. George
Howard, Edwin Warren, Virginia Harned,
Olive L. Oliver, Murgaret . Robinson,
Blanche Button, and Louise Brooks.
Seats on sale. Thursdav. March 18.
JINEI Photographs at unusu
ally low rates.,
B. F. COTTWALS, 93! Pa. Ave.
LYCEUM THEATER
ALU THIS WEEK
THURSDAY AND SATURDAY.
of Talent and Beauty."
BROS.
With Their
MARSHALL and .'KLSOX,
Sissy and 1.
Wil. 11- MARC ART,
The Man Who Makes You Laugh.
JL.1-AI una UliAl'MA.N,
The Comedy Duo.
SMILING GIRLS 30.
Shade Beyond
NY.
AMCSEMENTP
IXON & ZISIMEIISIAN,
MONDAY, March 15th-EVERY EVENING.
STANDARD ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTRY.
Denman Thompson's Play,
New National Theater.
TOMORROW, MONDAY, MARCH 15,
Matinees "Wednesday and Saturday.
WEEK OP UNLIMITED LHUGHTER-I&
Presentation of the New Farce Comedy by Michael Morton,
MISS
OF YALE.
"The Funniest Ever."
Illustrated by
R Brilliant Goterie of Farceurs,
XJEXT
Wilton Lackaye in
BARGAIN
MATIKB
THURSDAY.
"WEEK OF MONDAY,
MARCH1 13.
COLUMBIA THEATER
METZEROTT Jz I.UCKETT. Managers.
NIXON & ZIMMERMAN, Directors.
Tho Foremost Actor on tha American Staja,
1
. CRESTON CLARKE
Assisted by
MISS ADELAIDE PRINCE
A.nd a Superb Company in His
NEW ROMANTIC DRAMA,
OTT 1 nTTTO niriTNTF'TVr
EEK Mbuuio u
GORGEOUS
SCENERY.
INDORSED BY
PUBLIC PRESS PULPIT
BIJOU. aWleM!s
MONDAY.
TUESDAY,
4 Matinees 4
A SPKIXG NOVELTY.
Richards and Pringle's Famous
GEORGIA MINSTRELS
HEADED BY
BILLY KERSANDS.
Matinee Prices Evening- Prices
15 and 25 ' 15, 25, 35 and 5b
, FBEK CONCER-r.S nt 1!30 and 7:15 In front oftho Theater.
Next Week STOWli'S UNCLE Toll's CAUIN CO.
n
RAND OPERA HOUSE
J KERXAX & RFFE ilANAOEItS.
-Week Commencing Monday, ifurcii 15.
"With Popular Price Mntinees- "Wednesday and Saturday
WM. CAUSER'S COMPANY
lu a. Massive Production of Sutton Vane's Hecord-nrealcing Drama,
THE SPAN
Now Successfully Touring Four Continents.
3
GREAT
SCENES.
llegular Prices 15", 2,5,50, and" 75c. Mntinees, 15, 25, 50c.
A good seat on first floor, 23c. Seats In boxes, $1.00. All seats
Couponed.
atx5?ios I TH0S. E SHEA, in "MAtf-O'-WARS-MAN."
ASirSEMKNTS.
!A
HOUSE,
Directors.
i FRANCIS
AVEEK
Dr. Belgraff.
a
jj
REGULAR
MATINEE
i SATURDAY.
P
53
Q
DKicn ""guESs
Thone 430.
FRIDAY..
SA1CEDAT.
THE GREAT (l
GX?332SGSS3S333
The Man 1
1 With Many ?
I Imitators
I ButNbEpaL 88
Supported By a
Coterie
Of Star
Artists.
The Light House on Coffin Rock.
The Ocean Liner Under Full Headway...
The Marvelous Bridge of Human Bodies,
ELAEORATE
SSS COSTUMES.
i
OF LIFE

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