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The times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1897-1901, September 21, 1898, Image 8

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THE TIMES. "WASHINGTON, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1S9R
r- c "&$$&? "-Tf-" J,"4S'ftf
OtdAi
If There Is
A better stock in any Cloak or
SuitDepartment 'round these parts
we've to learn of it. Ours wasn't
assembled in a hurry. All Sum
mer long we were thinking over
what to buy and where to buy.
We took time to look over every
line that was presented to our
notice. And today we have what's
not only the choicest in selection,
but the lowest in price to boot.
$2 Flannel -Waists,
'$1.69
50 dozen spick and span from their
cases. Some are plain. Some In fancy
colors. All sorts of rich plaids. A lib
eral how of green, card
inal, black, and nlum.
Many of 'em B.re braided.
They're worth every pen
ny of 52. Knowing- how to
buy, we can offer 'em to tlJLfi
ou at
i Cassirasre
Tea Gowns, $3.98
They're handsome and swell wraps
made up in all-wool French stuff. Plain
black, blues, and reds.
Nattily braided and lined
all the way through.
Worth one-half again the
price
$3.25 Brilliaotine
Waists,
Made of a very tough silk finish black
brllliantine; the fronts are handsomely
tucked, giving the waist
a tailor-made appearance.
Lined throughout and
a magniheent value SJ fad$
JS.23
$10 TailoMnade
Suits, $7,98
58 handsome all-wool Cheviot Costumes,
in navy and black, made sttpa Ik O
ui in the best possible M f g&
etyle with new front and J& I J?J
box sleeves. Worth every LP S 0 J
penny of flO
A 0neday Sale of Hohawk
Sheets and Pillow Cases.
48xG Mohawk Ready Made Q n
B.cach Pillow Cases vJ,-rU
SBxSC Mohawk Ready Made I 1 P
Bleach Pulow Cases I I 2 u
lclr
Mohawk Bolster Case, 45xi2 I OU
,Minwk Sheets, 54x -Olt
Mrimwk Sheets, 72x90 .-. "
MBbawk Sheets, SlxSO w
GooduaKty Bed Tick, lCc L2j
2c
2Kc
SSfenqh Unbleach Cotton
15 pairs 5c Apron Gingham.
Some Linen Leaders.
S pieces of pleached Table Linen,
CO inches wide; new, choice OCp
patterns uu
1W dozen 5-S size All-linen Napkins.
Very weighty fast selvage; 12 as
sorted patterns; ?1.25 value. (? flC
Per dozen P ' Ud
64-inch extra heavy 3-4 Bleached
German Table Linen; 50c 01 1 n
1&X36 Fringed and Hemmed rip
Hack Towels "
Laces and Embroideries.
109 pieces of fine and showy Cambric
Edging. Large collection of patterns.
AH fast edges and scalloped. Closed
nd Irish Point effects. 6 and
inches wide. 13c and 18c
value
Oc
Special lot of Point de Paris, Norman
dy " Piatt Valenciennes and Machine
made Laces and Inserting. "Widths
range from 3 to C inches. Large variety
of patterns to select from. S to "
12 l-2c values wu
S. Kant!, Sons & Co.,
Eighth and Market Spac;.
THE WILL OF A. SOLDIER.
Lieut. Flnsrsr Provided for the Di
pohitioii of Hi Instate.
The will of Lieut. Arthur I. Flagg, of
Company I, Third Virginia Volunteers,
dated May IS, 1S9S, was filed for probate
yesterday In the office of the register of
wills for the District of Columbia.
The testator states that, being about to
engage in war as a volunteer, and wish
ing to settle his worldly affairs before
entering Into the conflict with Spain, he
would make the following disposition of
his estate.
His earthly remains he leaves to his
Masonic brethren for burial according to
their ceremonies, the expenses of the fu
neral to be paid "by his executors, Philip
"Walker and John M. L. Lipscomb.
To his mother he leaves all his estate,
real and personal, with such exceptions
as may be afterwards named. To his
friend Mary L. King he leaves his house
and lot in this city, Xo. 1410 Bacon Street,
for her sole and separate estate.
WOES OF A DENTIST'S WIFE.
Mr. Genevieve V. Xiekel Applies for
a Divorce.
In her suit for divorce, filed yesterday,
Genevieve F. Nickel says her married life
with William T. Kickel has been un
happy. The parties were married in this city in
1S91 and lived together until 1E9C. when the
plaintiff alleges on account of ill treat
ment by her husband she was obliged to
seek protection at the home of her moth
er. Mrs. Nickel says her husband is a
dentist, enjoying a lucrative practice, and
asks that she be awarded suitable ali
mony and the custody of their only child.
End Your Evening Wheel Ride
at the Alhambra Garden. 4th and E ne.,
and enjoy the Wash. Brewery Co.'s fine
beers, served direct from the vaults "while
listening to good music.
SUQ
$710
i MUST PAY THE EMPLOYES
Mandate of the Court in the
Belt line Case.
TIIE LIST OF 0BEDIT0B8
Tlio Modified Decree Ordering the
Sale of Uie.noa.tL May Be HnniLV
Down In a Short Time Date of
Sale of tlie Property Ih Indefinite
The Roads That May Bid.
Under the mandate of the Court of Ap
peals in the case of S. S. Daish & Son,
against the Belt Line Railway Company,
attending the decree in the suit of A. M.
Ament, against the same company, the
employes of the road are to be as pre
ferred creditors, and, with some others,
are very soon to receive the wages which
have been withheld from them for nearly
a year.
The mandate of the Court of Appeals,
which was made public yesterday In the
clerk's office, states substantially that
on account of the act of Congress, passed
June 24, 1S9S, defining the rights of pur
chasers of the Belt Railway, says that
the decree passed by the Supreme Court
of the District of Columbia on Decem
ber 24, 1S97, in the case of M. Amant
against the company ought to be modi
fled and paid from the proceeds of the
sale of the property of the road, there
should also be paid before the payment
of any sum is made to' the holders of
bonds secured by the deed of trust of
September 13, 1SSS, or to the holders of
bonds secured by the deed of trust of
July 31, 1S91, the claims of the employes
of the receiver of the Belt Line Railway
for unpaid wages and guarantee fund de
posited, aggregating in amount the sum
of $4,930.
"To accomplish this, the receiver is
directed to issue to the employes certifi
cates of indebtedness in the form pre
scribed by the Supreme Court of the Dis
trict, which certificates will be paid by
the trustees of the road, the American
Security and Trust Company, out of the
proceeds of the sale of the road. This
mandate In connection with the sale of
the road, was made in the decree of the
case of S. S. Raish & Son, a creditor who
sued the road for $11,038.29, with interest,
from February 1G, 1837.
Among the other creditors provided for
are: "William Duffy, $100; The Diamond
Stall Iron Company, $330.22; The Warren
Ehret Company, $300; Augustus S. "Worth
ington, counsel fees, $250; A. B. Browne,
extra counsel fees, $173; Ament & Co., M.
Provender, 203.09; A. Bradley, passenger
tickets, $50.54; Capital Traction Company,
track rent. $322.3S; F. P May & uo., naru
ware, $144.99.
The decree also provides for the pay
ment to W. Kelsey Scheopf balance as
commission as receiver to December 31,
1SS7. $4,930, together with $2,017.64 as as
signee of claims of the employes of the
Belt Line Railroad for services rendered
during his receivership and compensation
at the rate of $2,000 a year from January
1, 1S9S, to the final ratification of the sale
of the property.
The claim for the wages of the em
ployes of the road is granted on the peti
tion of P. J. Ryan, representing Thomas
F. Tucker, Augustus A. Bullock, James
B. Grinder, David AV. Skinner, Thomas
S. Hayden, Charles M. Sangster, Luther
B. Feete. Henry Connell and about 100
other employes. These employes appeal
ed from the decision of Judge Cox in the
Daish case, in which he made the bond
holders prior, preferred creditors. They
went to the court of appeals, holding that
the laborers were the soul and body of
the corporation without whose aid it
could not exist and hold its charter.
It Is understood that arrangements will
be made wlthin"vth"e " next few days for
the issuing of the , receiver's certificates
for the payment of the employes. These
certificates, it' is also stated, will be
cashed 'dollar for dollar bythe trustees
of the road, the American Security and
Trust Company when presented for pay
ment. According to the terms of the act of
June 24, 1S9S, providing for the sale of the
road the purchaser or purchasers buy
with it the notice that they cannot com
mence upon the equipment or improve
ment of the lines of the road until all
outstanding indebtedness is paid.
In case the road is put up for sale and
will not bring sufficient money to liqui
date all its indebtedness the purchaser
will be compelled to advance the differ
ence which is necessary to pay oft all
outstanding claims.
It is expected that the modified decree
of the Supreme Court ordering the sale
of the road will be handed down from the
Court of Appeals very shortly. Until
then nothing definite can be determined
as to the date of the sale of the property.
It is probable that several of the local
street railroads will be among the bid
ders when the line is put upon the block.
It is said that the City and Suburban
Road, which extends to Eckington, will
make a bid for the line, and it is alto
gether likely that the Metropolitan and
Capital Traction companies will bid prin
cipally on account of the traffic of the
line In the extreme northwestern and
southwestern sections of the city.
HER DELAYED ANSWER.
New DcvelopiiientK in n. Fnnionx Di
vorce ClINC.
On motion of her attorney and after
hearing argument on the question, Jus
tice McComas yesterday granted Mrs.
Ella Caroline Robertson permission to
file her answer in relation to the custody
of her minor children.
This is the case in which the Rev. E.
O. Eldridge figured so prominently as a
co-respondent with Hugh Saxon, in the
suit for divorce brought by George
Thomas Robertson against his wife. At
the time of the filing or the bill Mrs,
Robertson failed to avail herself of the
opportunity to answer, and a pro confesso
was granted. Then Dr. Eldridge inter
vened and asked permission to submit tes
timony before the examiner appointed to
take evidence in the case.
The matter is still pending in the
equity courts of the District of Columbia.
ASTHMA CUBED AT LAST
DR. It. SCIIIFFMAXX" PROVES HIS
FAITH IV HIS REMEDY BY
G1VIXG IT AAVAY.
Dr. Rudolph Schiffmann is a recognized
authority on the subject of throat and
lung diseases and has, during a practice
of over thirty years, undoubtedly treated
and cured more cases of Asthma and kin
dred diseases than any doctor In the
world. He announces that he has at last
perfected a remedy which not only in
stantly relieves the worst attacks, but
has permanently cured thousands of so
called "incurable cases." Dr. Schiffmann
has perfect confidence In his remedy, and
in order to convince others of Its merits
in the quickest, surest way, he has ar
ranged with the well-known druggist, F.
A. Tschiffely, 475 Pennsylvania Avenue
northwest, to give a liberal sample pack
age to each sufferer applying at his store
next Thursday. An opportunity to test,
without cost, a remedy so celebrated and
promising so much certainly should be
eagerly grasped by every sufferer. Those
living out of town will be sent a free
sample not later than September 30 by
writing simply name and address on a
post card, and sending to Dr. R. Schiff
mann, 315 Rosabel Street, St. Paul, Minn.
TEIR PARTICULAR NEEDS.
Annual Report of the Citiiena'
SforthYVCHt Suliurlmn Ajnocintion.
The annual report of the Citizens'
Northwest Suburban Association has been
submitted to the Commisslonersr "The re
port embodies many suggestions for. .im
provements In that particular section of
the city and Is signed by the following
officers of the association: Charles - C.
Lancaster, president; Louis P. Shoe
maker, chairman of; the executive com
mittee; J. "W. Chappell, secretary; Robert
L Fleming, Theodore L. Holbrook, John
Sherman, Horace S. Jones, Charles "W.
Richardson, M. D., Major George A.
Armes and "W. L. Grouse.
The report reads, in part, as follows:
"In order to improve this section and
to assist you in making your estimates
for appropriations for the fiscal year 1899, 'i
wo have called upon the various sub
committees having special charge of the
particular needs of this part of the Dis
trict, and we hereby respectfully sub
mit the result of their labors.
"Public Health We recommend that a
sanitary inspector be appointed for this
section to prevent the accumulation of
garbage, which by neglect might generate
diphtheria and impair the present healthy
condition of this section, for which we
ask you to estimate for an appropriation
of $1,500.
"Public Roads The public roads of this
section have not been and are not credit
able to the enterprise and development
of this part of the city, and we recom
mend that they should be improved by
the use of gravel or crushed stone. AVe
especially refer to the "Woodley road, ex
tending from Connecticut Avenue to Wis
consin Avenue, the Grant road, extend
ing from Broad branch to Wisconsin Ave
nue; Pierce Mill road, extending from
Rock Creek to Wisconsin Avenue; the
Chapel road, extending from Broad
branch road to Connecticut Avenue ex
tended, and the Broad Branch road, from
Shoemaker's mill to the District line.
and Connecticut Avenue, from Rock !
Creek to the District line and Wisconsin
Avenue. For this work we ask you to
estimate for an appropriation of $50,000.
"Public necessity demands that Grant
Road Street should be graded and regu
lated from Connecticut Avenue extended
to the Broad Branch road. It is believed
that the owners of the adjoining property
will donate the necessary land for the
opening of this street. For this work
we ask you to estimate for an appropria
tion of $49,000.
"Electric Lights The absence of light
upon this avenue and these roads renders
travel dangerous and very inconvenient
to the public. For this improvement we
request an estimate for an appropriation
of $3,1G0.
"Fire Protection Strangeas it may
seem, there Is no fire department in the
northwest section of Georgetown. The
necessity of the public requires that there
should be established on Wisconsin Ave
nue, near the village of Tenleytown, a
fully equipped engine house and chemical
engine. For this improyement. we ask an
appropriation of $15,000.
"Public Schools The rapidly increasing
population of Cleveland Park and its vi
cinity requires the location of a public
school In this section. For this purpose
we lequest you to estimate an approprla
i tlon of $20,000. The public school build
ing In the village of Tenleytown requires
remodeling and enlarging, and is much In
need of general repairs. We respectfully
urge that $5,000 be expended for Its im
provement." A BITTER COMPLAINT.
The Deplorable Laelc of School Fa
cilities la Cnliunliia Height.
J. A. Caldwell, secretary of the Colum
bia Heights Citizens' Association, called
at the District Building yesterday and
placed before the District Commissioners
a communication from the executive com
mittee of the association complaining
against the school facilities of that sec
tion of the city.
The protest says that the school facili
ties of that part of the city are inade
quate. The following statement is made
In the complaint:
"Very many bitter complaints and most
righteous protests have been made. ,to us
from citizens who sent their children to
the Johnson School yesterday morning to
enter them into an advanced grade from
that of tho previous year, having passed
satisfactory examination, but, to their
utter amazement, were told that they
were no longer eligible to enter that
school, as they were out of the limits as
fixed by the trustees. Ko previous warn
ing having been given in any manner,
not even to the principal of -the school,
until last Saturday, the 17th Instant, a
number of permits had "been Issued to
scholars outside of the limits.
"We are informed that the boundary Is
Florida Avenue south. Spring Road north,
the west side of Thirteenth Street east
and the east side of Seventeenth Stroet
west.
"We think this Is a very unjust appor
tionment for the people living so much
nearer to the school, though just outside
the eastern limits, and who have i?ent
their children from the 'beginning, old
resident taxpayers who have built up the
community In that locality, and who are
thus thrust out on account of the con
gested condition of the school by virtue
of the influx of the vast population In the
past few months, and eor the most part
transients.
"We earnestly request of your honor
able hody to take such immediate action
as will at least reinstate the old scholars,
pending some permanent relidf to the
present sad condition of affairs.
"We respectfully suggest that there is
.at present advertised on Columbia Road,
just west of Fourteenth Street, a large
building for rent for school purposes,
which might be secured to give immediate
relief."
Date for the Parade.
Commissioner Wight, who has immedi
ate charge of the police and fire depart
ments of the city, has announced that the
annual parade of the members of the two
departments will occur at 3 o'clock on
the afternoon of Saturday, October 15.
next. The police las this year will he
presented to the precinct making the best
showing on parade, and the award will
be made by a committee of citizens im
mediately after the police pass the re
viewing stand.
Municipal Brevities.
Dr. William C. Woodward has been au
thorized by the District Commissioners to
attend the twenty-sixth annual conven
tion of the American Public Health Asso
ciation to be held at Ottawa, Canada, on
the 27th 2Sth, 29th and 30th of the present
month.
In the matter of tho complaint of W.
P. Carroll, of No. 721 Fourth Street
northwest, that his property has been
damaged in consequence of the lowering
of the grade of the alley in square 302
the District Commissioners have notified
the complainant that they do not consider
that they are to blame.
Deaths of a Day.
The following deaths were recorded at
the health office during the twenty-four
hours, ending at noon yesterday:
Mary E. Ball, 52 years; William Henry
Dougherty, 4S years; Anna Wood, 45
years; Roger W. Moore, 42 years; George
W. Mothershead, 24 years; Arthur F. Til
llus, 25 years; Ella C. Matthews, 21 years;
Sarah A. Clarke, 20 years; Mary Birley,
14 years; Charles R. Ricketts, 3 years;
Ida Harper, 2 years; Dorothy T. Taylor,
10 months; Rose Alexander, 9 months;
Lillian Morrison, 7 months; Emma King,
6 months; Mary Ellen Paterson, 4 months;
Rose Grady 3 months.
District boys who wish to rapid
ly regain lost health and strength
should drink "Munchner" Beer.
It's an ideal tonic.
3-Case of 2 doz. bottles, 51.25.
Write or 'phone 222. National Capi
tal Brewing Co., 14th and D Sts. S. E.
WELCOIMEPDBUGll
The Eew Stores of Parker,
Bridget & Co.
OPEN nOUSE TffiS EVENING
The Splendid EMtaltllHliment ol the
"Head -to - Foot Outfitter to
Man" at the Corner of Penn
sylvania Avenue nntl
Xlntli Street.
After an unprecedented business ca
reer of five years in this community,
Messrs. Parker, Bridget & Co. will this
evening have written the brightest chap
ter In their already brilliant commercial
history.
The opening of their new store, at
Ninth Street and Pennsylvania Avenue,
this evening and tomorrow morning will
mark a new era in the clothing business
in this city..
The business opening tomorrow morn
ing will be preceded by a reception to
the public, beginning at 8 o'clock this
evening. There will be music and flow
ers, congratulations and welcomes, and
the guests of this progressive firm will
be shown over the four capacious floors
of the building the grand lloor exhibits,
comprising every article required by boy
or man to outfit him from head to foot.
Tomorrow Messrs. Parker, Bridget &
Co. will be installed among the great
clothing houses and outfitters of this
country, and they will rank second to
none, either In the quality or variety of
the stock they enrry, or the modernness
and completeness of their magnificent
building.
It has been nine years since this pro
gressive firm started in business In a
modest way. Since then their business
has steadily grown along lines of fair
dealing, a desire to please, and up-to-date
methods until their trade could not
be accommodated In the old building on
Seventh Street. Therefore, when the big
building of Perry's, corner of Ninth
Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, became
vacant, Messrs. Parker, Bridget & Co.
secured a long lease on the premises.
Extensive Improvements have been
made in the store; In fact, it has been
practically rebuilt. The whole of the
front has been torn down and a magnifi
cent one substituted; the entire interior
has been altered and remodeled, and tho
store is now one of the handsomest in
the city. Standing, as It does, at one of
the most frequented corners in town, it
is a monument to Washington's com
mercial prosperity, and a witness to the
ability and integrity with which Parker,
Bridget & Co.'s business has been con
ducted. It shows that the fundamental
principles of business have been grasped,
and that Straightforward dealings and
liberal business methocs, which have
been their guiding spirit throughout, will
win their just reward.
The members of the firm are well
known in the clothing trade. Long be
fore thoy embarked in business for
themselves they thoroughly learned ev
ery detail of the business and have al
ways been highly regarded by their host
of friends and the general public, which
has absolute confidence In them and their
straightforward methods.
The vast space at their command in
their new building enables them to carry
several new departments, which they
have hitherto not had room for. Noticea
ble among these are hats, shoes, furnish
ings, and sporting goods, and it may be
confidently predicted that they will be
just as successful in these departments
as they have in the others, and certainly
the samo methods will be pursued
straightforward dealIngs,up-to-date stock,
and prices as low as they can be made on
honest goods. It has always been a mat
ter of comment that goods bought from
Parker, Bridget & Co. could be depended
upon.
The departments on the first floor of
the big building will be devoted to men's
clothing, furnishings, hats and shoes, and
no efforts have been spared to collect one
of the most complete stocks ever placed
on inspection and sale In Washington.
Everything Is brand-new and modern, not
a single garment having been removed
from the old store; consequently thero
is no such thing on hand as out-of-date
styles.
Mr. Malcolm M. Browne, who was for
years with Woodward & Lothrop and
Perry, will be the efficient manager of the
furnishing department, which will be
complete in every detail and comprise
a men's furnishing store with all the
small necessities of man's attire in com
plete variety.
The shoe department is an important
feature; large space has been devoted to
it and a costly and carefully selected
stock has been laid in. Mr. William H.
Keneaster, formerly of Edmonston's, is
the manager, and he ip a thorough shoe
man. who knows the needs of the public.
A special bid for buslnes.s will be made
by this department, as it must win its
way to fame ,and consequently the values
will be even greater than in the other
departments.
Mr. T. Blake Claggett, recently with
Robinson. Chery & Co., will preside over
the hat department. He is thoroughly fa
miliar with this line and will conduct his
branch of the immense business house in
an efficient manner.
The sporting goods department will be
In charge of Mr. W. J. Espey, late man
ager of the Washington branch of the
Fowler Cycle Company. The display in
this department will be complete and the
prices as reasonable as the excellent qual
ity of the goods will permit.
The boys' and children's departments
will be on the second floor. This branch
of tha business is one that has had re
markable success, and for some time they
have been generally regarded as the lead
ing juvenile clothiers of the town. The
new quarters are magnificent and the
stock hefits them. It is without doubt
the finest stock of children's clothing
south of New York." The firm are pleased
to state that Mr. Charles Godfrey has
resumed the management of this depart
ment. On the third floor will be the custom
tailoring department. It will be conduct
ed by Mr. John Harkshaw, a practical
cutter and expert tailor, for many years
associated with leading houses of this
city. A specialty in this department will
be the making of liveries and uniforms.
Every kind of garment will be turned out,
from servants' liveries to soldiers' uni
forms, and everything will be made abso
lutely correct, both as to style and fit.
The most expert cutters and tailors have
been secured, but still the prices will be
very modest and in keeping with their
others.
The fourth floor will be used for reserve
stock and bushellng.
Taken as a whole, tha new establish
ment of Parker, Bridget & Co. wilL be
complete, magnificent and one of the best
outfitting establishments in the District
That the firm will receive a large share
of patronage is assured.
All are cordially invited to inspect the
building and superb stocks and to study
the tempting values off erod.
A
llfllSIL
Cash
or
Credit.
We're well fixed
To supply every want that the
house suggests. Not a nook or a
corner that we have not some pret
ty piece of furniture to fit or some
rich looking draperies to impart a
cosy appearance. And all this
wealth of beauty and comfort is at
your disposal and not a single
reason why you should not buy.
Our prices cannot be improved
upon, and the terms you can sug
gest yourself. We gladly credit
you and await your pleasure in
paying.
House & Herrmann,
Liberal Homefurnishers,
901-903 Seventh Street,
Corner of EYE Street.
UiYiViYmYiYiVrViViYtVmVYeYViVVViYiVrr
I A $5.00 SHOE FOR $3.50 1
5
m
5
: $3.50
I $3.50
$3.50
$3.50
i $3.50
ft B
;
$3.50 SHOE ith?a&nd.
Indorsed by over 1,000,000 wearers.
5 The style, fit and wear cannot be ex-
.celled at any price. All kinds of
: leather. All the modern styles. All
fS widths. One price, $3.50.
BOYS WEAR W. L DOUGLAS
$2.50 SHOE. Same quality as the
men's. Very stylish.
Sec tli em at our exclusive store,
1013 Pennsylvania Ave.
JynuiH
Gone and you have
not ordered yet . .
Why Do You Delay?
To give you another chance we
will again offer for this week best
quality
enon
. J. dE.ri,
708 11th St. N. W.
RE 13 5 AWAY horse almost Impossl-4-3
92 ble if you use SNELL'S
SAFETY AUTOMATIC HITCHlXa
WEIGHTS. Call and see them. Prices, 51.50
and &2. JOHN B. ESPEY, 1010 Pa. ave.
se7-tf-em
fr P For an elcpantly-made Suit to dQf1
4 I u jour measure worth 4U
MORTON C. STOUT & CO.,
se20-tf 12th and F N.W.
AMUSEMEXTS.
NATIONAL a-S TONIGHT
Messrs. Klaw & Er
larjger Present
Matinee
THE
ROGERS loaay,
BROS. 25, 50 and 75c.
In John J. McXallj's latest Success,
A REIGN OF ERROR
Hear the catchiest song1?. . The prettiest music
and most unique specialties.
Adapted to excite laughter.
Next Week VIOLA ALLEN, in "THE CHRIS
TIAN." selO-tf
"NATIONAL"
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT.
WEEK BEGINNING CpPT o T
MONDAY EVE., O L Y I jC O
FORMAL DEBUT AS A STAR OF
Miss Viola Allen,
In IL&L CAINE'S Adaptation ol His Famous
Novel,
The Christian
Supported by a Company of Suncrb Talent.
Magnificent Special Scenery.
SEATS OX SALE THURSDAY.
sel9-tf
COLUMBIA
Tonight 8:15
Popular Matinee Thursday, 50c.
itegular .Matinee fcaiuruay.
SViORDAUNT & BLOCK
STOCK COMPANY
DIPLOMACY,
ALL-STAK CAST.
Next Week CRESTOU CLARKE.
BASEBALL
TO-DAY.
CINCINNATI vs. WASHINGTON.
LADIES' DAY.
GAME GALLED AT 4:15 P. M.
ADillSSION,. 25 AND 50 CENTS.
Next Cincinnati, Sept. 22, 23.
Jjlll P $3.50
WMwmk $3-50 i
LD Douglas I
white Ash Bqal
AT
WIVS
.H..IlI,H,.H.Hl,I..I.,r,.I.x,.:,,,T.I
A Special 3Day Sale of j
Men's, Boys' and Children's Clothing j
With prices that even cast a shade over the most brilliant f
achievements of this store's past. We are losing on every T
item. But we can afford to forego profit. Our main object
is to exploit our own make of Suits. Clothes made for the 2
first time in our own workrooms, and which we know intimate- f
ly to be the best that the land can produce.
Every Suit Bears the Label of the United
Garment Workers Union.
Men's new Fall cbvert topcoats,
made from a splendid grade ol im
ported cloth. Lined with good wear-Insuring-
materials and T PC
worth no less than $S 4)4.00
Fine English covert topcoats, tail
orded in a way that swagger dress
ers aro accumtomed to have their
apparel. Sleeves lined with ffl pr
silk. Worth all of J12 4.00
A stylish double-breasted suit of
rear black Hawthorn cheviot. The
suit will fit as though tailored. It's
equal doesn't exist un- ffr rn
der $10 40.UU
A first-class every-day man's
suit in all wool materials. Some
cheviots some fancy mixtures. It
will put to shame any $7 fln OT
suit you ever owned 4)0,0
1.000 pairs of good stanch- Qp
knee pants 3u
Great Furnishing Leaders.
An Umbrella that never sold under $i (26-mch) 59c
The newest Fall Neckwear tecks and four-in-hands 9c
Suspenders that ought to be 25c 9c
The latest shaped Fall Fedoras, worth $2 98c
h PffrcmiNni
Corner Ninth and E.
Our Store is on the Corner.
AMUSEMENTS.
Special
AT
Grand Ball
By Mile Louise Wrench,
The Most Daring Aeronaut in the World.
Special Engagement of the ROYAl HUNGARIAN BAND of New Yoifc
CAFE A LA CARTE.
ABSOLUTELY
, FIREPROOF.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
HERALD SQUARE THEATER ATTRACTION,
HOTEL
TOPSY TURVY.
MAGNIFICENT SCENERY.
BEAUTIFUL COSTUMES.
CUORUS OF FIFTY VOICES.
AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA.
N. B. Carriages may be ordered at 10:30.
NEXT AVEEK "THE FEMALE DRUMMER."
Company of 50 Johnstone Bennett, Richards,
Cunfield Willis Sweatman. Chorus 25.
BIJOU THEATE. 20, 30C.
Matinee Every Day.. .2 P.-M.
Every NiRht S P. M.
THE GREAT FRANK BUSH.
Lizzie B. Raymond, Cuban Pastimes, 10 Other
Big Acts. Burlesque. 20 Pretty Girls.
ACADEMY
POPULAR PRICES.
MATINEE TODAY, 25c and 50c.
DONNELLY & GIRARD'S
GREATEST FARCE-COMEDY SUCCESS.
NATURAL GAS
PRESENTED BY
Edward Gdrard
AND A BIG COMPANY OF COMEDIANS.
Sept. 26 "AN ENEMY TO THE KING."
EXCCKSIOXS.
OYSTER ROAST AND EXCURSION
TU
COLONIAL BEACH,
CLIFTON BEACH.
SOMERSET BEACH,
Tendered Manager A. F. Wurach. Steamer Jane
Moscly, SATURDAY, SEPT. 2i, 6:30 P. M.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 25, 0 A. M. Oysters served at
Colonial Beach, Sunday, Sept. 25, 3 o'clock p. m.
For tickets and staterooms apply to GUZMAN,
925 Pa. ave. nw. Free list suspended. se21-tf
FOR MOUNT VERNON,
Alexandria and Arlington.
ELECTRIC TRAINS, STATION, 131-2 AND PA.
AVE. For Mt. Vernon, every hour, from 10 a. m.
to 3 p. TO.
For Alexandria and Arlington, tvei7 -15 min
tztcs. ROUND TRIP to Mt. Vernon, including Alex
indria and Arlington, 60c Alexandria only, 25c.
Arlington only, 20c.
Washington, Alexandria and Mount Vernon Rj.
iiiiiiiiii n x-i-i i : : i : 1 1 1 h-e
Superbly-made men's suits in
tweeds, cassimeres, cheviots and
diagonals. Lined all through with
the finest satin and gotten up in
the best way possible. CT OC
Worth J15 41.00
Natty suits for young men. In
cheviots, tweeds, cassimeres and
other desirable cloths. Some are
single-breasted a ome double-
breasted. Their equal
doesn't exist at less
than $3.50
.$3.75
Suits for youngsters who wear
out lots of clothes. We made 'em
up in a way that you won't find
anywhere else In town. Double
seats double knees patent but
tons taped seams. Worth
3
$1.90
Splendid value
working pants
in men's
69c
T .
i
AMUSEMENTS.
Features
oon Ascension
. . . AND ....
tv
The Last and Championship
TOTJTK,Isr-A.Isd:E3SrT
Will Be Ridden At
SUITLAND PARK,
Wednesday, Sept. 21, 1898.
Tilting starts at 2 p. m. Crpwning of the Queen
at 9. Music and dancing all day and evening.
Stages irom Navy Yard every half hour.
se!9-2t-em
KERNAN S THEATER.
Afternoon, 2:15 Evening. S:15.
JOHN W. ISHAM'S
TirE SBLE SATIRE.
"A TENDERLOIN COON."
Next Week-BRYANT iz WATSON'S AMERI
CAN BEAUTIES.
PARK BICYCLE TRACK.
Kaces Thursday, Sept. 22, 3 p.m.
Match Race Paced Mile Heats.
A. C. Moran vs "Em" Wilson.
Prices, 25 and 50c.
This Ad. is Oatof Place
But I want to leave Washing
ton, and will sell the contents
of my 10-room flat, consisting of
TiOLX. TOP DESKS,
SIDEBOARD,
EXTENSION TABLE.
CHAIRS, RUGS,
LACE CURTAINS,
COUCHES, PARLOR SUITES.
ROCKERS, IRON BEDS,
SPRINGS, MATTRESSES,
CENTER TABLES, MIRRORS,
CLOCKS, CASTORS,
And lots of fine housefurnishings at-
laymaa s
Commission House,
525 Tenth Street N. W.
sel4-lmo-em
THIS PAPER IS PRINTED
With Ink furnished by JAENECK2 BROS, ft FB.
6CHNEEUANN. Hrw Tork Citr. rtl-Um
J

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