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The times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1897-1901, March 20, 1901, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85054468/1901-03-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE BRITISH MUST RETIRE
Colonel Wognck Firm in His Stand
nt Tientsin
Ho nrfrntpM to DIsciim n ComiriiiiiIc
Vntll Tlil Ik Hour The Deadlock
1 iiclinnsircd Prccinidoiin lt Keop
the French Troops In Bonds
PARIS March 19 A tlcspatch from
Tientsin saja that Colonel Wogack the
Russian commander In rejecting the pro
posal for a compromise of the railway
Biding dispute told Field Marshal Count
on Waldcrsec that he declined even to
discuss the matter until the British left
the concession
General Lord Campbell approached an
said he could not leave The deadlock
therefore continues
Count on Waldersee Is distressed by
his failure to nrrange a compromise
Colonel Wogack made a statement to the
correspondent to the effect that the point
In dispute was not whether the disputed
ground was Russian or Chinese but
whether the British had made good their
trespass
When the British advanced to take pos
session the ground was protected by the
Russian fag and the boundary was
clearly delimitated The Hags were torn
down and thrown awav by a working
party of the Bengal Pioneers and their
coolies who continued to work until they
were driven off by the Russian guards
If the British had asked for authoriza
tion it would have been immediately
granted but they tried to use force and
now they must withdraw before there
can be any discussion as to the ownership
of the ground
The despatch adds that there his been
much brawling without serious results
between Trench and British soldiers
Tho attack b French soldiers on Cap
tain Bogler of the British armv has led
to a demand by the Trerch that a court
martial b appolntjd to trj the captain
Three Frenchmen made Captain Bogler
leac a rickshaw in which he was riding
The captain defended himself with his
fists and had placed some of his attack
ers hors de combat whn a party of
Sikhs came to his assistance
It is for this that the Trench demand
his punishment
TIENTSIN March 19 General Lord
Campbell the British commander here
and General Vojron the French com
mander hae made a friendly arrange
ment to preent a recurrence of the dis
turbances of French soldiers in the Brit
isn cocerinu
General Vbyron recognized that the riot
ous conduct of his men must be stopped
and he has accordingly forbidden them
to leave the French concession Their of
fensive conduct and abuse has been level
ed alike against the British and American
soldiers none of whom is armed when
on leave
The French always carry side arms and
the consciousness of this advantage ap
parently made them truculent Once an
American disarmed a Frenchman and
then returned the weapon to the French
mans sergeant explaining how he got it
LONDON March 20 The Standards
Tientsin correspondent represents the be
havior of the French soldiers as being
worse than stated by the other corre
spondents His charges include threaten
ing several people with swords and drag
ging women from rickshaws He adds
that their officers say they are mutinous
General Voron has brought gendarmes
from Ptkin to assist in maintaining order
The Pekin correspondent of the Times
says that Prince Ching one of the Chi
nese plenipotentiaries confirms the re
port that Russia has agreed to eliminate
from the Russo Chinese agreement the
clause granting exclusive privileges to
Russia in Mongolia and Turkestan and
also to modify various other clauses to
which China objects
VON BTJELOW CRITICISED
Prince llimmrck voire Gcrninn
Seuilmelit iitttheCIilllCke 1KM jon
BERLIN March 19 Trince Herbert
Bismarck toda broke his long silence In
the Reichstag to criticise Chancellor von
Buelows Chinese policy His remarks
yhoed the feeling of uneasiness that is
widely prevalent and growing in Ger
man He contended that the Chsnvllor
was mistaken In declaring that ti Chi
nese question was vital to German He
admitted that it was Important but its
importance was commercial rather than
jmlitlcal
Chancellor von Buelow replied that
Germany not only had important inter
ests to guard but must vindicate the na
tional honor which was outraged by the
raurfer of Baron von Ketteler the Ger
man Minister at Pckin
The discussion was chiefly interesting
in that it brought to the surface the gen
eral and Increasing desire of Germans to
withdraw from the province of Pechlll as
boon as it Is consistent with dignity
THE RUSSIAN AGREEMENT
Manchuria Prucdrnlli Included In
lie Cut cuuul
LONDON March 19 A question was
ixked In the House oi Commons this af
ternoon as to whether the agreement be
tween England and Germany in regard to
China applied to Manchuria
Lord Cranborne Parliamentary Secre
tary of the Foreign Oirice replied that
the second clause of that agreement
which insisted that China should not be
diminished territorially was without
qualification That is no Power should
be allowed to acquire special spheres in
that country
THE POSITION OF JAPAN
Huron IliijnMii Delitiex lie Altitude
of Tlmf Counlrj
LONDON March 39 In an interview
toda Baron H ij jslil the Japanese Min
ister to Great Britain said that Japan
did not regard with pleasure the Russian
operations in Manchuria but he added
there would bo no cause for complaint If
Russia adhered to her avowal that sho
had no intention permanently to occupy
that territory
If however she did occup it and then
turned her active attention to Korea Ja
an would take action
When i -at
aske
tnU acton wouId C
UiTun Hayashl replied that It would de
pend on circumstances
Lumber Turd itmonir lie people tin
own at th and N aie and prices Ion cat
Ubbry 4 Co
TO CONTINUE THE WAR
Ilntlui ltejecf lie I emu Proffered
lis Kitchener
LONDON March 19 The Boer war Is
to be continued The peace conferences
between General Kitchener and the
burgher leadtrs in South Africa for the
purpose of reaching an understanding
that would end the hostilities have come
to naught and there is no telling how
much longer the guerrilla warfare will be
continued by the remnants of the Boer
armies In the field
In the House of Commons this after
noon Mr Chamberlain Secretary for the
Colonies said that Gen Louis Botha
commander-in-chief of the Boer arm I
had informed General Kitchener that he
Botha did not feel disposed to recom
mend the British terms of surrender to
the consideration of the Boer Govern
ment
General Botha added that his Govern
ment through Its chief officers ngreed
with his views
Mr Chamberlain said he would make
General Kitchener s terms public at once
There is considerable speculation as to
the cause for the refusal when the pros
pects for peace were so bright It Is
generally believed however that De Wet
is largely responsible for Bothas refusal
to capitulate as it is known that De Wet
and others among the Boer leaders aro
very much opposed to ending the conflict
It is to be presumed also that President
Kruger was strongly opposed to giving
up the fight although it is not known
that he has been consulted In the matter
of surrender Report savs that Mr Kru
ger has not et given up hope of the cur
rent turning in favor of the Boer cause
It is believed that the Boers in the field
will now become more aggressive and It
is conceded that In many localities they
can give the British forces a great deal
of trouble
LONDON March 10 The terms of
peace offered to Commandant General
Botha by General Kitchener and refused
by the former are not jet known The
papers are not expected until today
The newspapers express regret that the
terms were rejected
SKIRMISHES WITH THE BOERS
The IIkMImk Continue Willi Onl
SllBlit Eucnireineiin
CAPE TOWN March 19 A number of
British despatch riders have captured Ave
Boers and forty horses near Redford
Cape Colon Slxij Bocra occupy the hills
overlooking the town
The Waterlierg Rifles have had a slight
skirmish with a Boer force twenty miles
south of Tarkastad The burghers were
apparently dispersed
The Boers admit having lost Ilfty Wiled
and wounded n their recent attack on
Llchtenburg
The Boers occupjing Wolmarenstad
were completely surprised by the British
attack on that place Many Boers regu
larly slept on the veldt and several of
them who were returning to the town in
the morning walked Into the arms of
General Mctiuens advance party and
were made prisoners
Four deaths occurred jesterday In the
plague hospital Four patients were dis
charged as cured
A FRENCH WRECK LOOTED
tevvfoiindlntul riIiernieii Meet With
u Windfall
ST JOHNS N T March 19 -The big
Trench bark Aqultalne from Bayonnc
France for St Pierre with 20u0 pack
ages oi liquors ana a full cargo of gen
eral fishery supplies was wrecked at Cape
La Hune on Saturday
When she struck the coast folk from
the adjacent harlxjrs poured aboard her
drove the crew ashore took full control
of the vessel and started to loot her from
stem to stern There were no police or
coast guards near The nearest magis
trate and cable office were 100 miles away
Tho French crew had to row this dis
tance In an open boat They arrived on
Sunday and reported the disaster and the
subsequent lawlessness and the magis
trate wired here for help The customs
department hav Ing no ship available had
to charter a tug from St Pierre In order
to send revenue officers to the scene
It Is expected the -whole cargo will have
disappeared by the time the officers get
there The wreck is a wonderful wind
fall for the Bcttiers in that quarter The
ship was filled with Just the articles most
useful to them In fisher pursuits besides
which such a stock of liquor forms an
unequaled inducement for wrecking
The custoinb ofllcers believe that every
thing mo able on the ship will be taken
and hidden In the woods until the excite
ment dies out when the plunder will be
unearthed for use The average fisher
man thinks It Is no wrong whatever to
loot a wrecked ship especially If she be
a Frenchman but he rarely gets a chance
at one filled with goods so suited to his
needs
It is thought the affair will provoke
friction with the Trench authorities of
St Pierre particularly if it is true as is
reported that the crew were beaten by
the marauders
THE VICTORIA MEMORIAL
A Me Chosen In Front of Iliickiusr
liimi Inlnce
LONDON March 19 The site for the
Victoria memorial has been definitely
chosen The committee having the mat
ter ill charge dicided to have the me
morial placed in front of Buckingham
Palace
Their decision was submitted to King
IMward who has signified his approval
of It A meeting has been called at the
Mansion House the official residence of
the Lord Ma or for March 26 to initiate
un appeal for funds to build the
memorial
It Is understood that Parliament will
not be asked to contribute anything for
the purpose and that the offerings will
be entirely voluntary
BEGGARS AWAIT CARNEGIE
A nir 1 hronir Illel o Meet lllm lu
Soiltlllluiutuit
LONDON Mirdh 20 According to a
story printed toda ilr Andrew Carne
gie is likely to be besieged by a horde
of beggars on his arrival in England
These are not of the class punishable by
the laws agilnst mendicancy but arc
mainly advocates of various religious and
philinthroplc objects who are inspired by
the idea that they have only to ask for
a check In order to receive it
It is stated that a number of these and
many less worth will go to Southampton
to await the arrival of the steamer St
LOuis It is even suggested that Mr Car
negies friends advise him to proceed to
Trance in order to escape the crowd
Scores of enquiries regarding the date
of his arrival have been made at the
oftlc ef the American Line Many of the
enquirers made no concealment of their
Intention to oS
lllood Telia
purlacj the blood The gnat prinj
medicine
Convenient I umber Ynrd Middle of
the cit near everybody doord 1 too eth
and X V art
ASIinVG TOX
PLOTS TO KILL THE CZAR
Two Alleged Attempts Made on
IIS Majesty- Life
Until CnnNpIrncIrN said to lie n 7nrt
tif the Present Mo v ement StndentH
Fired on In St Pelerslmrjr IJve
Killed mill ElKht Wounded
BERLIN March 19 Stories are current
of recent attempts on the Czars life In
connection with a widespread revolution
ary movement of which the students
riots in St Petersburg and elsewhere aro
alleged to form a part
The Tagcblatts St Petersburg cor
respondent claims to have learned from
an unquestionable source of two separate
conspiracies to assassinate his Majesty
The first attempt was planned to be made
on the occasion of the Jubilee of the
Naval Cadet Corps whose ball the Czar
had promised to attend
His Majesty was ready to start and
was awaiting his carriage when Gov
Gen Kiclgels arrived at the palace and
informed him tilt he must not go sev
eral suspicious persons belonging to the
Revolutionary party having been arrested
at the Nicolnl Bridge with arms and
forged passports
Ho Informed his Majesty that the pris
oners were probably emissaries of the
Central Nihilist Committee at Zurich
The visit was accordingly abandoned
The second affair occurred in the middle
of January when the Czar accompanied
by his mother visited the ceramic exhi
bition When entering one of the rooms
the members of the committee who were
escorting the imperial party suddenly
noticed an uiknown man hurriedly ap
proaching the Czar
As the public had been excluded and
those authorized to attend had been care
fully selected the presence of the
stranger excited suspicion Several of the
Czars party hastened to meet him to lead
him away
Thereupon the man thrust his hand into
one of his pockets Ho was instantly
seizeu ami wncn searcneu a Dumb was
found In his pocket
He has since disappeared from public
ken and the correspondent adds it will
probably be a long time before an one
learns of his whereabouts
LONDON March X The St Peters
burg correspondent of the Daily Mall
sas that the rioting there was renewed
on Monday on the occasion of tho mass at
the Kazan Cathedral for M Bosolepoff
the murdered Minister of Public Instruc
tion
The students caused disturbances out
side the cathedral and the polico were
obliged to use their revolvers They fired
several voile s and Ave students were
killed and eighty wounded More than a
hundred were arrested The rioting
broke out again at night and the police
knouted many of the disturbers It is
believed that the trouble will Increase
The Standard has received advices
from Moscow under date of March 15
recording the murder of a student by
some of his comrades ostensibly because
he refused to Join In their demonstra
tions but more likely became he was
supposed to have betraed dangerous se
crets
Large bodies of troops are posted about
the city but they and the police acting
under Instructions from Grand Duke
Serge Governor of Moscow treat the
demonstrators with extreme gentleness
Consequently no violence has occurred
The correspondent adds that one of the
most curious features of the situation is
that not the faintest hint of the universal
ferment or of the daily assemblages in
the streets is allowed to appear In the
newspapers but there is reason to fear
that the authorities to some extent s m
pathize with the crowds
THE COST OF THE FAMINE
The Budget in ludln shown Enor
motiH Kxiiemlldirei
LONDON March 19 In addition to the
enormous loss of life caused by the fam
ine In India the budget shows that the
disaster cost the Government In 190o and
1901 SM7t0W of which 4227000 was ex
pended in direct relief
Apart from thn foregoing 2740000 was
advanced to native States for famine re
lief and 9470 for special agricultural
advances
ATTACXEB BY OUTLAWS
A Mexican Ilnuter Ov erpovvereil In
IIIh Home lj llrlKmiiln
CORDOVA Mcx March 19 Pedro
Maza a wealth planter of this section
was attacked in his home by a band of
brigands and literally cut to pieces with
knives His servant who attempted to
defend him was shot and killed
The robbers carried off all money and
valuables in the place The outlaws are
being closely pursued and will probably
be captured
WELCOMED AT PALANOC
Ilie Philippine ComnilsKlnn Eslnli
Hnlies n Government for MiiNhnte
PALANOC Via Hollo March 20 On the
arrival here of the members of the Phil
ippine Commission the were met by for
t -seven delegates from fifteen towns of
the Province of Masbate The found the
district complete pacified but deplora
bly Impoverished through the cattle dis
ease which has ruined the Inhabitants
chief source of wealth
The timber Industry has been paralzed
by the effects of the Spooner amend
ments The Commission organized a civil
government for the province combining
the governorship and secrctaoship In the
appointment of an e insurgent major
Lieutenant Snjdcr of the Twent
seventh Infantry was appointed treas
urer and Corporal lenders of the Sec
ond Infantry supervisor
The Inhabitants are intelligent They
desire the establishment of schools the
Introduction of American cattle and a
voluntarli organized police
To SInU American lletUod
LONDON March 19 The Midland Rod
way Company is sending two engineers
Dccley and Woollseroft to the United
States to study American methods in
cluding the adaptation of electricity- to
railroads
Tro per cmu paid on clwtiu mliject to rhfck
at will Union Trust and Storage Co HH K it
Peopled Lumber Vnril clone nt hmid
at Ctli ami K l ate nw iTirjthlnE fur re
pairc too
WEDNESDAY LKClF7To01
MANY DESTRUCTIVE FIRES
Iveutncl ntiil Inillnnn Tow no Swept
by CimllnKratlnns
I OUISVILIE March 19 Within the
list week there has been an epidemic of
fires which have wiped out several small
tow ns
The first was at Cloverport Ky in
which three hundred persons became
homeless The council tonight appro
priated 5000 for their relief
Last night Memphis Ind was de
stroyed the loss being about JljOOM
This morning Crandall In I was on fire
but the loss was only 23000
This afternoon the town of New Llber
t near Carrollton caught fire and when
telegraphic communication was cut off it
seemed doomed to destruction The place
is a town of about 1008 Inhabitants
In every case the fire originated In some
trifling manner but the fierce winds which
have prevailed for the last week have
bjiread the flames with uncontrollable
rapidity
MADISONVILLE Ky March 19 Fire
started in an abandoned tobacco stem
mery here this evening at 7 oclock and
before It hd burned Itself out it caused
about JIjOOOO damage
The town has no fire department and
assistance from EvansvlIIe Ind came
too late One square of the town was
burned out and the only thing that kept
the fire from doing more damage was a
strong wind which blew tflo flames away
from the business portion
A fire at Rockport Ind near Louis
ville burned two tobacco warehouses and
their contents entailing a loss of about
20000
A BLIZZARD IN NEBRASKA
Trnin Snowbound In JUnny Iartu of
the Mule
OMAHA Neb March 19 An extraor
dinary snow storm prevails in Nebraska
tonight It has raged alt day and this
evening assumed the proportions of a
blizzard
The wind has attained n velocity of
fifty miles an hour and the fine snow has
drifted into enormous piles throughout
the State In the eastern part of the
State the blizzard is at its -worst Man
car lines were abandoned after much
struggling against the storm
All evening trains were an hour be
hind time Through trains were sent
out with snow plows ahead of them In
the more exposed portions of the State
some trains were abandoned
While the snow will be of immense ad
iXaKe to the winter wheat fields the
live stock industry is suffering The
spring lambs will hardiy be abc to stand
the cold and the heavy The loss
from this source will undoubted be
heavy This Is the feature which
entails damage-
The storm appears to be abating in
Omahi this evening It has been keenly
felt because the previous few days were
spring like
THE INVITATION FRAMED
President Mitchell Ietier
lie
Operators Kept Secret
SCRANTON Pa March p We have
concluded our conference wid -framed a
letter to be sent tOthe presldents of the
different companies but have decided not
to give a copy to the press was the
statement made by President John Mitch
ell of the United Mine Workers organ
ization this evening
There was nothing more than that to
say Mr Mitchell declared The confer
ence between Mr Mitchell the district
presidents Nichols Duffy and Fahey
and Mr Dllcher of the national board
was held this morniag at miners head
quarters Secretar Dempse of the local
union was also called In
Early this afternoon Mr Mitchell went
out for a walk not returning for several
hours Considerable apprehension is felt
among Ills official associates as to his
phvaica condition which Is said to be
in danger of breaking down The state
ment was made today that the severe
strain under which Mr Mitchell has been
for some time is beginning to make it
self seriously felt and quiet rest and
lelief from the feeling of rcsponslblllt
were imperatively demanded
It Is said that It Is the intention of Mr
Mitchell to go to New York In about a
week and seek peisonal interviews with
the controlling officials of great coal in
terests with a view of Influencing them
to consent to a recognition of he union
In the mean time public antipathy to
tho proposed strike seems to be growing
HAZIETON Pa March 19 There was
a convention here toda of delegates from
local unions of the Mine Workers Union
in the Hazleton region
It was said this morning the conven
tion because of the general dissatisfac
tion of the miners in this district with
me action taieen oy the general conven
tion on Saturday would declare against
any steps being taken which might lead
to a strike As this would be tantamount
to a defection of the Ilnzleton district
from the union considerable importance
was attached to the proceedings of to
da s convention
If any such action was taken however
it was not made public as at the close
of the proceedings it was said that the
only business that had come before the
convention had been the matter of lec
tion of officers and Jonn Duffy had been
re elected President and J P Gallagher
re lected Secretary of tl district
As the convention began at an eany
hour this morning and lasted until this
evening it is thought come Importiit
matters outside the election of officers
were considered
MERCHANTS MAKE A PROTEST
The
WilUfilnirre Hoard
W AKlllimt u Srl
WILKESBARRE March 19-
of the Board of Trade called
noon to discuss the probable s
miners sent tne following aim
f Trnile
meeting
Is after
e of the
to
Ident T D Nichols of this district who
is a member of tho committee which has
power to declare a strike
The Board of Trade of Wllkesbarre
calls upon ou in our capacity as presi
dent of District No 1 of the union to
rf st J lle eent of our ability n
strike In the anthracite coal region for
a recognition of the union on a purely
technical point which will bring wide
spread havoc and disaster to the miners
and business interests of the anthracite
coal region
As representatives of the business In
terests of this community we look to you
and depend on ou to avert this terrible
calamity
Oce nn Steniiiklilii Movements
NEW YORK March 19 -Arrived Oni
ric Liverpool Menominee London
Kocnlgin Louise Bremen Elbruz Liv
erpool Batavia Hamburg Roman
Prince Liverpool Ailcr Gibraltar
PIynn Hualnean College Hill nnd K
Casinos Shorthand Tpcrltins M a jtar
evv Flooring iS r 1lO ft
all one width ib dried Libbe 4 Co
IMPRISONED BY COBYICTS
Fitteen Guards Held in the Kaiias
Penitentiary 3Iinc
Ios Work nnd Iletter Food De
manded the Iveeiiern Reins
ulneil un IlnnlflROx llirentn uf
Murder Made by lie Mutineer
LEAVENWORTH Kan March 19 In
the coal mine at the State penitentiary
at Lansing 2SI convicts have fifteen
guards at their mercy They refuse to
let them out of the mine and all under
ground work Is suspended
The convicts are holding the guards ns
hostages for the enforcement of their de
mands for lighter work and better food
nnd grave fears are felt for the safety of
the olllccrs Many think mat some of the
guards have already been murdered
Some of the prisoners in the mine are
life men under death sentence by the
peculiarity of tho Kansas statute regard
ing capital punishment
The mine in which the convicts are en
trenched is 750 feet deep Its mouth Is
inside the prison walls The guards on
duty In the mine are armed only with
clubs on account of the danger of fire
following the discharge of a gun and
consequently the prisoners would have
very little trouble overcoming the guards
The families of these latter are Intensel
ccited for fear harm has befallen them
All the convicts nit In the mine have
been confined In cells so that the mouth
of the shaft may b guarded closely
against a rush by the convicts The first
outbreak in the mine toox place a little
after the noon meal esterday and was
started by the convicts In division No 8
Of the nineteen men In this division six
teen seized the guarel and overpowered
hhn and announced that they had decided
to strike
They told the guard that they had de
cided to mine two Instead of three cars of
coal as a das work in the future and
that they proposed to have better food
This guard was left in charge of two of
the convicts in the mutiny while the oth
ers marched to the adjoining division and
spread the revolt and called on the con
victs to Join them
The convicts were soon marching
through the mine from one division to
another elllng and swinging their lamps
and picks Other desperate convicts en
tered Into the spirit of the mutiny
The convicts forbade anyone to come
down and announced that the warden
would be communicated with in writing
An ultimatum of the convicts written on
white paper In a veryilliterate hand was
sent up It was as follows
We have concluded to wreck every
thing in the mine unless uu accede to
our demands We demand that you give
us three square meals a day every day
in the week and that ou cut the task
to two cars a day We dont want any
more corn orcorned beef or peasany more
cornbread liver or pigs feet We are
willing to do right and demand ou do
the same We want those men taken off
punishment and this must be This is
our proposition and we demand an an
swer inside a half hour
Warden Tomliuson sent down the fol
lowing reply
To the miners I cannot agree to
our demands the- are not right
Of course ou can wreck ever thing
in the mine if ou want to do
so but that will not help ou
out Ever officer in the bot
tom must be sent up in safety to the
top befoie the miners are brought up
WARDEN
Since then a number of requests have
come out of the mine and the warden
his promised to givn them better food
but his conditions sent down from time
to time are for an unconditional sur
render The names of the fifteen officers
held In the mine arc II McShane W W
Gavin A E Derb shire Hugh Monahan
John Sonnerfeldt W M French Thom
as Baglln David Purvis W R Kinsley
A J Hill W II Owens A Huecke C
R Stanbuck W E Bird and M K Hain
line
A communication was received from
one of the guards at noon today stating
they were very hungry and tired but as
far as he could learn all were alive The
warden is cool and expects to tire the
men out
He points out that he can shut e ff the
air supply from tho mine and If lcces
sary suffocate ever man below in a
quarter of an hour He adds that of
course he would not do this because it
would expose his own men to the same
danger as their captors
As it stands the prisoners control the
communications with the surface and
while present conditions continue they
dominate the situation
On Sunday a disturbance occurred In
the dining room while the convicts were
at dinner They objected to pigs feet
which had ben served for the meal They
alleged they had them oftencr than they
desired Tills is believed to be one of the
causes of the revolt in the mine
The situation is a most serious one The
warden refuses to deal with the men
and sas he can starve them out On the
other hand the men threaten to murder
the guards if their demands are not
granted
They have had no food since esterday
morning but they say they will kill the
mules of which there ore a score In the
mine If the warden does not lend food to
them
Tonight the situation lias not grown
an better Ihe warden still holds firm
in ills decision to starve them out
A Ilia Crow Hill Defeated
CHATTANOOGA Tenn March 19
Tho Tennessee Legislature has refused
to pass a bill requiring street railway
companles to provide separate cars for
whites and blacks There wns a deter
mined fight to pass the bill and the vote
was close
Norfolk A VVnNliiijiiii Stcnmbnnt Co
Delightful trips dall at 6 SO p m from foot
7th fit to Old Point Comfort Newport 2tcws
rfolk and the South For Fcncdule see page 7
While fine Dniirn KIOO ench 1 f H
indies thick utoek sizes at Cth and X 1 arc
D E THOMPSON NAMED
Vebrnsknn IlepiilitU Rii Cnneun
on he Second ntnlnnlnn
LINCOLN Neb March 19 A new
Senatorial caucus with forty five or two
thirds of the number necessary to elect
met tonight The call provided that It
became operative as soon as signed by
forty five
Rosewater sought to beat it by circu
lating a forty eight call but dropped
gracefully Into line when the MeiMeJohn
and Thompson men sccureel fort -five
names to the call There were fifty five
men in the caucus or twelve short of a
majority
On the eighth ballot D E Thompsot
of Lincoln was nominated for the short
term Senatorship The nomination was
at once made unanimous
Nine of the seventy one Republican
members have sworn they will never vote
for Mr Thompson and his nomination
therefore does not necessarily mean his
election
After Thompson was nominated the
doors were locked and balloting begun on
the long term man with Rosewater lead
ing
At midnight the caucus was still dead
locked over the selection of a North
Platte or long term member Rosewater
led with SO votes to 1G for Melklejohn nnd
S for Currle Under the rules the caucus
must remain in continuous session until
the second man is named
KILLED IN A PRIMARY FIGHT
One 3lnn Demi nnd VInn Wounded
in Cnne Kr
JACKSON Ky March 19 Details of
the fight at Caney in Morgan County on
Saturday between the Elam and Allen
factions reached here today The trou
ble arose over the result of a Democratic
primary election
It appears that whisky was dispensed
freely by the Elam crowd who were op
posing the election of one of the Lykens
toys for magistrate The Aliens who have
been for years enemies of the Elams v- ere
friends of Lkens and soon a general
fight ws going on
John Elam is reported dead The
wounded are D K Lykens shot through
the shoulder and arm John Sebastian
struck in nrm and head Allison Lykens
skull fractured with rocks Logan Elam
left arm broken by bullet Will Alien scalp
wounos Jim bampson hand hurt Bud
Allen shot in leg Tom Tidmore strue C
In ee with rock Mort Smith shot in
hand
Smith Tidmore and Sampson were not
participating In the fight Some of the
fighters were arrested but their trials
have been continued No more trouble Is
feared
A MAYOR FATALLY SHOT
Victim of n 3Iun He Hud Fined for
Annnult
CHATTANOOGA Tenn March 39
Horace Brannan Maor of Winchester
was fatally shot by George Shadow son
of the proprietor of the Cedar Hill nurs
ery The shooting occurred In the street
between the recorders office and the poat
ofiice and was witnessed by several per
sons
Shadow who was arrested last Satur
day night by the city authorities for as
sault and batter was trieel and fined
by Mayor Brannan At the close of the
trial Shadow remarked that he wished to
see Brannan
A few hasty words were exchanged
when Shadow became very angr and
fired two pistol shijts one of which took
effect near Mr Brannans heart Shadow
was re arrested and is in Jail Mr Bran
nan Is one of the leading citizens of Win
chester while Shadow has alwas borne
a good reputation
WRECKED ON A TRESTLE
Two Men Ivilled in mi eeldeut
Ienve he Cruiser nt
o
a Train
COLUMBUS Ga March 19 A freight
train on the Columbus and Rome branch
of the Central of Georgia Railroad was
wrecked at 1I 20 today on a trestle be
tween Chlpley and White Sulphur
Springs W A right engineer and Jo
seph Key the fireman both of Columhjs
ere killed outright and others of the
crew were injured The cause of the
vvreck has not been learned
The Columbus and Rome is a narrow
gauge and has perhaps been the most
fortunate of all the other Central
branches this being the first accident of
any consequence In many ears
DESERTERS FROM THE DIXIE
Mint Men
the
Norfolk nril
NORFOLK Va March 19 There have
been many absentees on roll call since
the Dixie got off the Potomac mud bank
and came here to go into dr dock Man
tars aboaid took French leave Some
took to the woods and It is thought will
never come back unless in irons
Others have been straggling in toda
overdue from twenty four to sltt hours
When darkness fell tonight and the Nor
folk Navy Yard closed the DKies com
plement was short eight -one men
of these are landsmen mainly
Westerners and twenty are of the ships
crew
Commander Belknap believes that most
of the missing men are on a lark and
will come back but that some will not is
attesteil by the fact that two were over
hauled esterday when many miles from
Norfolk making their way overland
Most of the missing were farmers until
recently and it is plowing time The
report that they were to be sent to Ma
nila is held by some to have led the tars
to desert
The men say they left because shore
liberty was refused This Is probabl the
real reason for the desertions
VISITED MORRO CASTLE
General Miles mill Governor Wood
IliHpeet lie Illivnilll Defences
HAVANA March 19 General Miles and
Governor General Wood toda visited
Morro Castle and the Cabanas Fortress
They also inspected the batteries on the
coast toward Vedado
Subsequent General Miles and Colo
nels Scott Pope and Whitne and Lieu
tenant Hanna started for the Isle of
Pines They will return on Thursday
A MEXICAN LINE BOUGHT
The
Southern InellU Itepnrteil in
Courol if lie nloiinl
MONTERKYk Met March 19 The an
nouncement was made here today on ap
parently gooel authority that the majority
of stock of the Mexican National Railway
Company had been acquired by parties
In New York City representing the
Southern Pacific properties
It Is said the new owners will change
the road from narrow to standard gauge
It Is the shortest route between the Rio
Grande border and the City of Mexico
Where It Touches K Henls
Zcina Cura positively cures Eczema and
slm diseases
all
InrKeMt nnd Heat ShlnKleM f iter
ltTX tizc 0 v20 No 1 cjprcss F libbey Co
Price One Cent
RETURNED NAMES OF DEAD
Serious Charges Ajrains t a Mary
land Census Enumerator
Stephen A Aliell n Policeman In
ATnnlilnstoii Arrested Denies In
Initlon WronKOdlnu Ilenrlnir of
the Cane on lie lolltlcnl Situation
Stephen A Abel a census enumerator
la St Mary County lid and one of
Representative Mudd s appointees to the
local police force is held at tho Sixth
precinct station on a charge of having
falsified his returns to the Census Bureau
last June The warrant was sworn out
by Charles S Sloane of the Census Of
fice and alleges that Abell returned on
June 29 the names of seven persons who
were dead Bond was fixed at 1000 The
prisoner was unable to raise the security
lat night
During the evening Mr Mudd called
conferred with Abell and departed say
ing he could not tell whether or not he
would serve as Abells counsel
In the course of several statements
made during the afternoon the St Mary
enumerator admitted having certified the
dead men as residents of his district He
urged however that he had been In
structed in ths law by various repub
lican leaders at Leonardtown and he un
derstood from them that dead men might
be entered on the returns In the enumera
tors discretion
They were Republicans he said and
I am a Republican and I trained with
that crowd They had read the law in
the papers and knew more about P than
I did One of them was my cousin Knoch
Abell who is the clerk of the Circuit
Court and editor of a newspaper the St
Marys Enterprise Another was Mr
Ching a lawyer there They both told
me I could include dead persons
Judging from Abells revelations yes
terday the other enumerators in SL
Mary County were instructed along
similar lines One of them did his months
work In eleven das he knew the country
so well as Abell explained he could Just
sit down and fill in tlw blanks from mem
ory
Something line that had to be done
Why the people down there are the most
Ignorant people on earth the prisoner
went on When the enumerator would
call at their house the whole family
Jumped to the woods If ou did not taka
down their names from memory why
they just slipped you thats all A lot
of those people live in mud houses with
trees growing out of them as big as your
arm They dont even know their own
names When they saw me coming they
took me for a detective and I had to put
them down a flying A man had to use
his own Judgment I tell you Then the
more names ou got the more ou got
paid They gave me three cents for a
llv e man four cents for a dead one and
so on up to thirty cents for a list of tha
people In a manufactory or soaie business
like that
It was well Abells story was told the
reporters early in the afternocn About
6 oclock Mr MudJ called and the ac
cused grew- decided taciturn The Rep
resentative made a statement la which
he denied having assisted in instructing
the enumerators asserted he had appoint
ee Abell to the police force at the request
of the St Marys Central Republican
Committee and had barely a speaking ac
quaintance with the enumerator If any
of Abell s friends desired to raise tho
IW0 bail he would be very glad to com
municate with them But he had vot
been In any wise involved in the Instruc
tions to return the names of dead men
To all of which Mr Abell subsequently
gave his fuu assent
At Annapolis the view taken of the case
will probably be different By the In
creased returns Mr Mudd has obtain J
an additional seat In the Maryland fow r
House It has been charged that he and
his aides among whoi Abell of the En
terprise and Mr Ching are foremost
bent every effort to bring up the returns
of St Mary with that purpose In mind
Further with a large enumeration it
would prove the easier in subseeiuent elec
tions to transport delegations of black
voters into the county and register them
for Mr Mudd s oeneflt
The Democrats have accused the Re
publicans all over the State of these tac
tics and the Governor practically made
the charges tne occasion for the present
extraordinary session of the Legislature
The two main objects of that extra ses
sion were the enactment of an election
law which should make impossible the
maneuvriftg accredited to Mr Mudd and
the other Republican manipulators pro
vision for a State census which should be
free from the inaccuracies and irregulari
ties said to exist In that Just completed
b the National Government With tho
latter subject tinder discussion today the
arrest of Policeman Abell Is likely to
prove of very personal interest to the
legislators
The prisoner Is a man of about forty
two ears and a tpical St Mary man
in appearance and manner He seems to
think he has served his party faithfully
he has acted on the advice of the leaders
he knew down home he believes that
now he is in trouble they will come to
his assistance It is evident he sets
nothing unusual in returning as active
residents men who hail been dead sev
eral weeks when he made his report The
story he told during the afternoon was
consequently of rare Interest
The appointment came to him June 1
lie worked about a month all told and
was paid something over 199 In that time
he covered the eastern half of the 111th
enumerating district mostly swamp land
It was supposedly his purpose to gather
statistics on the basis of taxes paid sinco
the earlier census was taken At any
rate that was tho explanation given him
for the use of dead mens names When
the work had been done ho felt hlnwlC
entitled to some preferment at the hanls
of his party and Mr Mudd obtained for
him an appointment as street crossing po
liceman in Washington That service be-
IIkCh of Lumber ami lllllvvork for
suburban cottases bdt taken care of at Cth and
X 1 avc

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