OCR Interpretation


The Salt Lake herald. [volume] (Salt Lake City [Utah]) 1870-1909, January 24, 1891, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058130/1891-01-24/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

RTAB
a r
f c N
Y
5
k fi w THE SALT LAKE HERALD SATURDAY JANUARY 24 1891 r
t DEPARTMENT GIRLS
Women of Republics are not
Ungrateful
A ilOKDMSKT TO SPIDER
F
The Girls Say He Deserves tine and Shall
Have It Pretty and Practical
Creatures
WASHINGTON Jan 19 Republics may
be ungrateful but the wont n of republics
are not The women who are employed in
the government departments here have set
out to build a monument to Gen Spinner
and they will build it Why is Gen Spin
ner to have a > lounraent Because he was
I the first pubu official to employ women
in the work of the government When
Gen Spinner became treasurer of the
United States a quarter of a century ago
Uncle Sam employed no women except
as charwomen or room cleaners This is
not right said Spinner This iswork a
1 1
r
r
t V
U j Ii
1
t 0
p fm
Co > = =
TREASURY OIPLS PICVIC TO GEN SPINNER
woman can do as well as a man The
women shall have u chance Gen Spin
ner opened the doors and now see the re
sult Uncle Sam employs in Washington
about five thousand women or onethird
of his entire force
The women make just as good clerks as
the men and some observers say a little
better They waste less time talking poli i I
tics or reading newspapers do not go out i I
in the corridor to smoke during bushier i
hours and in summer do not ask to get oft
thirty miimte efore time in order to at
tend the baseball tpimes To this day Gen I
Spinner is the hero the idol the patron
saint of the depirtmeit girls While
he lived they helped to make life pleasant I
lor him They loulea i him with presents on
holidays and birthdays They surrounded
him with their love and adoration Every
summer they took him to picnic all in
his honor and carried to him the best fish
the choicest flowetx and wreathed gar
lands for his brow Those were happy
days for Gen Spinner and itis not sur
prising that he said a short time before
his death that the act of his which he was
proudest of which give him most satisfac
tion was openiugthe doors of government
employment to women j i
Probably Gen Spinner himself never I
foresaw the result of his innovation When
he began placing women on the govern
men layr01l he did not imagine that in i i
twenty years or so a thousand women I
should be employed in the treasury alone I
nearly as many more in the pension office
and large numbers in the patent office
census office in fact in every department
of the government even in the war and
navy offices and the Capitol itself He
could not look ahead and see women drawI
ing three or four millions of dollars a I
month from the public coffers for services
rendered I
The women of the departments are of all
ages and from all the walks of life as well
as from every state and territory in the I
Union Old and young beautiful and
homely work side by bide and side by side
CIt
r
f
Ji = Ji I
p r Mt C M
i U a A M i
J
iY Y J
tN ffr t
n I J tt k I
v IrGt I
S E L tJ l
f ti + Ltatj
ti
ru I
w tt I
fitF t
CoDA
u
A TIJEASUItr GIRL GOING TO WORK
with the men too without harm to them
selves and with good inlluence upon their
masculine companions What is better
these women are on the same level with
the men as regards pay and promotion
They draw the same salaries for the same
work are classified in the civil service
without distinction of sex and are protect
ed from political interference Happily
the days in which politicians bartered in
fluence for feminine flesh and blood are
at an end or nearly so Occasionally one
comes upon an instance of barter and sale
of violation of the laws of God and man
in the departments but one may find
quite as many such cases in private life in
mercantile and professional circles The
only discrimination made against women
in the departments is in the matter of pro
motion to the chiefships of divisions Nat
nrally these posts are filled by men Eigh
teen hundred dollars a year is therefore
the highest price paid to women in govern
mt nt employ Five or sis women are re
ceiving this salary and earning it too
1 In the treasury two women Miss Seavey
of Tennessee and Miss Van Vranken of
flew York draw 8159 a month They are
unmarried and have been nearly a quarter
of a century in the internal revenue divis
ion They are so expert in their fields that
they have been pfomoted over the heads of
most of the men in the bureau Another
11500 clerk is Miss Ada Tanner daughter
of exPension Commissioner Tanner who
is n confidential clerk in the treasury Five i
women in the treasury get 1000 a year 31
lIDO and nearly 150 draw 1300 A hUll
dre d are paid 1000 a year and nearly 400
900 a year Yhat is true of the treasury
is true generally speaking of other de
partments though the number of women
clerks is greatest in the treasury The
only places in which women arc not given
an equal chance with men are the bureau
of engraving and printing and the govern
ment printing office In the mechanical
work of these conc rus the men draw the i
i big pay the women the pittances For
instance in the bureau of engraving and
printing the money printers earn 5 or 5G j a 1
day while the women who serve as their
helpers and many of them competent to 1
take charge of pressesget but 0123 In 1
tl3 government printing office women re
ctvo S10 a week for doing the same work
c for which men are paid from 518 to 22
Hundreds of Uncle Sams women em
h = I
7
plojes are well to do They have saved
their earnings invested in real estate br
other property and become independent
There are women in the treasury worth
from 10000 to 8100003 each who still go
on at their work There is no reason why
they should not for the toil is not arduous
and the hours are anything but onerous
Light work from 9 to 4 with a half hour
for luncheon frequent holidays and thirty
days leave of absence every year is not a
task calculated to undermine the strength
even of a delicate wc nan Some of the
women clerks in the treasury keep car
riages and are middle aged dames An
employe in the third auditors office is as
sisted by a liveried footman to alight every
morning at the treasury steps from a costly
brougham drawn by a pair of stylish
horses Many of the department girls
I marry but in few cases do they leave the
service
1 Often the husband is also a government
clerk and with two salaries they manage
to buy a handsome home and employ
plenty of servants
f There are plenty of marriageable girls in
the departments pretty but practical
creature capable of supporting them
selves and husbands too if necessaryjust
the girLs to make good sensible help
meets At the luncheon hour while the
men clerics are rushing out to the res
taurants or saloons many pretty groups
are formed by the girls who manage to
subsist on an apple and a cracker and who
bring forth novels or fancy work to mix
with the gossip of the moment
There is plenty of romance in these de
partments For instance in the depart
ment of justice works a beautiful old lady
a typewriter operator who was once the
reigning belle of Washington society Her
hair is as white as snow and her face full
of the charm of refinement and matured
I comeliness Her eye are still bright and
magnetic and mac t maiden might envy
i her her complexion This lady Mrs Kunde
lette was the daughter of a commandant
of the Marine corps Her husband was n
surgeon in the navy As maid and wife
before the war no woman was more courted
or admired than she Her motheryMrs
Nicholson was a reigning belle in New
York half a century ago
I f i
fl
1
m
i t
t
A GROUP AT LUNCHEON HOUR
Mrs Rundclette has very high family
connections and a good social position
even if she is a typewriter operator in a
government office She is n type of time
well born well bred women whom widow
hood or other accident of life has brought
to daily labor in the departments and a
pretty picture she made the other day as
she stood hand in hand with another type
of department girlsa silly and bewitch
ing coquette who needed a word of moth
crly advice
These departments are full of the wid
ows and daughters of senators repre
sentatives governors geuerajs and other
public men In the pension office for in
stance is Mrs Gen Pickett whose hus
band the Confederate general led at Get
tysburg one of the greatest infantry
charges known to the history of wars Mrs
Pickett now draws salary 1400 n year
yet for a time this woman of refinement
and beauty was on the rolls of the interior
department as a charwoman In the patent
office works Miss Alice Meikleham the
greatgranddaughter of Thomas Jefferson
In the bond room of the postofiice depart
ment handling the bonds of Jill the post
masters of money order offices in the coun
try is Mr Flora Fissett Hodge a win
some little widow whose mother is Mrs
Fassett the artist known to fame as the
painter of the Electoral Commission
picture which hangs in the senate gallery
Another department girl is Mrs II N
Ralston the widow of a distinguished
western lawyer a contemporary and friend
of Stephen A Douglas
Miss Mary Livingston of the postoffice
department is a granddaughter of Robert
Leroy Livingston the last of that famous
family to sit in congress and a niece of
John Livingston founder of Rutgers col
loge Miss Livingston gets 1200 a year
Miss Gamier of the postofiico department
is a niece of Joaquin Miller Miss Sewell
of the international money order division
speaks French German Spanish Italian
Swedish Norwegian and Danish and gets
81200 a year for translating letters Miss
Wai worth of the census office was laugh
terinlaw of Chancellor Wnl worth the
last of the chancellors
1f 1ll
t 4rice
rvl4 y
I
I i
4 m
I
c1 m
i d
r
j 1 r
I L 4
j
i t
j r
>
I
lt
r r n ctr
7 le fI
J i i hF1t t
I
TilE OLD BELLE AXD THE TOUNG ONE
These are a few of manysimilar instances
which might be cited The departments
are full of interesting persons whose
careers have been romantic and eventful
What is better the department girls arc
faithful workers good wives mothers and
daughters and typical representatives of
the self reliant cultured working women
of cbe republic OICRT GRAVES
rr WORKED
A Plan Adopted by a flan THio Wanted
to See the Play
The theatre was crowded The curtain
had just risen Jewels flashed gay plumes
on wondrous headdresses fluttered in the
heated air costly fans waved slowly to and
fro and the fashionable audience turned
Its eyes and opera glasses toward the stage
and settled into the hush of expectation
that precedes the opening of the play when
the experienced stage manager has waited
considerately for all the late coiners to be
seated before the bell taps for the curtain
to rise
In a conspicuous location about halfway
between the orchestra and the front seats
+
of the parquet circle were three ladies who
had come in unattended about five min
mites before They were noticeable for the
wide flaring umbrageous hats they wore
Directly behind them sat a nervous look
ing despairing man who was making
wild but fruitless efforts to see the stage
The wide hat with theirwealth of trop
heal bird foliage hid everything wanted
to see from view In vain he winded and
u
a
N
squirmed and craned his neck from sine to
side The hats were too large too close to
gether and too richly upholstered
Apparently unconscious that he was at
tracting the attention of everybody in his
neighborhood and bringing the ladies in 1
front of him into unpleasant prominence
he persevered till sounds of ill suppressed
laughter were heard on all sides of him
Then he settled himself back in his chair
with a world weary sigh but the next mo
ment took advantage of a lull in the per
formance on the stage to lean forward and
address one of the ladiesthe one who sat
in the middle
Madam he said in a loud whisper I
beg pardon but it is utterly impossible for
me to see through your hat and the Lord
made me too small to see over it If you
will kindly remove it you will make a
wretched man happy for a whole evening
The forty or fifty persons who were look
ing on saw the lady remove her hat at
once turn round and smilingly beg his
pardon They saw the other two ladies
take off their hats also and the example
became instantly contagious Ten or a
dozen other enormous = hats came off with
in the next half minute much to the re
lief of the sufferers directly behind them
Then the star f of the evening stepped on
the stage and the attention of the audi
ence was attracted to the performance
again
The details of this pleasing little incident
are given in full for the purpose of ex
plaining to those who witnessed it that the
whole affair was a put up job
The lady whom that man addressed was
his wife and the other two were his sis
ters Chicago Tribune
Couldnt Go On TTiilioiit Jim
A policeman at the Polk street station
yesterday morning walked up to a young
man whom he had observed hurrying to
and fro in a feverish way for an hour or
more and said
Mj friend what is tho trouble Is there
anything I can do for youv
Do for me Jerooslum Nol Not un
less yon can bring back that 8C3 train
Ill bet a thousand dollars it left ahead of
time
Cant you go on another rain t
Certainly Thats what Im waiting
for But it doesnt leave till SIiO this
afternoon and wont get to where Im go
ing till about midnight and that wont do
at all
If its anything important cant you
send a telegram
Send a telegram Ive sent half do7en
already The fact is Im on my way to a
wedding to take place at i oclock this
evening ale got some presents for the
bride
brideWell
Well said the policeman the raso
isnt so bad You can deliver the presents
the next morning The wedding will be
over of course but
Wedding overt Jumpiii Jupiterl It
wont he over Thats the trouble
Why not
Because it cant come off unless Im on
hand Ive got to be them Im the man
thats going to be married Policeman
you mean well but you cant pour any of
the oil of joy into this wounded bosom
Ill feel obliged if youll go awav some
where and sit downChicago Tribune
I
Bicyclist Walter J Bray
Walter J Bray of the Lincoln Cycling
club of Chicago holds his clubs safety
championship and during 1S9D made all the
eastern and western cracks ride their hard
est at the big bicycle meets At the Chicago
tournament Sept 19 > and 20 he secured
6
t
5 m I
r r C
t
<
F i
b
f t = ri c f
WJ1 <
8 J 00
t 1
C r l
I If r fillJI 1
i I t
Jfk
W i p fl
j l i 4
1
i 1w
t WALTER 1 BRAY
one first and one second prize against soma
of the best riders in the country At the
Parkside track paced by Van Sicklin
Lumsden VTinship and Thorne he re
duced the five mile safety record solid
tire from IGrn 4s to 15m 3 25s
He has also covered the thirtyeight miles
of rough country roads between Chicago
and Elgin in 3h 15m Bray is 23 years old
and weighs ICO pounds
I Frame P Slavin
Frank P Slavin claims to be anxious for
a fight with John L Sullivan lie is quot
ed as saying that he will fight Sullivan on
any terms and bet 85000 that he knocks
him out in six rounds Charle Mitchell
i is also said to desire a mill with Sullivan
I
I for 12000 a side in a twelve foot ring In
i such a ring there would be no danger of
1 another walking match like the Bruges
1 affair
I
I Fate of a Paralytic Smolccr
I
About once in so often a tragedy is an
nounced as the result of smoking in bed
The latest victim is Louis H Ileberlim a
helpless paralytic aged 05 who was fatally
burned at his home in Brooklyn one even
ing recently The old man who was un
able to leave his bed was left alone by his
wife while she went out to do the market
ing His 14yearold daughter was iu an
I otner part of the house and after a while I
had her attention attracted to the smell of i
smoke On searching for the cause she
discovered that it came from her fathers
apartment and on entering was horrified I
to see the bed iL flames and the old man I
feebly fighting for his life Her brother a I
barber who was employed next door was I
the first to answer her frantic calls for I
help In his endeavor to rescue the invalid
he was badly burned about the hands but
his efforts to save his fathers life were un
availing as he was found to be dead when
the flames were extinguished An inves
tigation showed that the dead man had
lighted a pipe and in this way had set fire
to the bed
She AVciit Iliad and Died I
Some despicable cur in human form en
tered a school house at Memphis Ind tho
other morning and scrawled on the black
board a sentence charging Marion Parks
the father of Bertha Parks the teacher I
with being a murderer Miss Parks on
her arrival erased the writing but she I
worried so over the affair that she fell ill I
went mad and died within the week Now
the people are anxious to make the ac
quaintance of the scoundrel responsible
for her death The charge of murder was
based on rumors in connection with a
tragedy that occurred twenty years ago I
Too Clever to Eo at Large I
It isnt a safe thing generally to inter
fere with the administration of justice
Some time ago Gen Seleverskofi a Russian
official was murdered at Paris by an an
archist named Padlewski Two
news I
paper reporters Labruyere and Gregoire
aided the assassin to escape from France
Then they wrote up the story of the
flight and glorified their cleverness in
eluding the police Labruyere has as a
consequence been sentenced to eleven
months imprisonment while Gregoire will i
be sent to jail for eight months
I
I James G McDonald cL Co candies 1
f
eremcrss rs o a
WEARE NOW BUYING
u
IMMENSE SPRIN G STOCK
j CI
I To Make Room we will Sell our
Entire Stock at Less Tban COsta
I
I
SchVieitzer Cloal Buit i CO
33 AIN srKRE EJr 9
The Only Fs iusive Cloak and Suit Souse in Utali
NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIKE SUCCESS
I
r fif01 C ITS
AlJ l 11 VHjl yi JJlI
i iiJniMfm cjup i
u L 1 11 = ll = i U jj tJ 4
Has been a great success from the start which of course is owing to the GRAND
BARGAINS we are offering IN EVERY DEPARTMENT If you have not al
ready noted this glance at our large show windows and see an index of what you
will Hurl throughout our entire establishment For instance
That Line i of men Suits at 1
HOT ONE WORTH < LESS THAN 1000
QIP 6050o <
Those Beauties at
Q IO m o OO 0 REDUCED FROM 1000
PER SUIT
And that Elegant l line of
FORMERLY SOLD AT 2000 2250
1titmoOo
Q O I and S9R uO
vvw
S9113 I
mENS OVi RCOATS AT WORTH 1350
S 8 3 0 Ii WELL MADE AND GOOD WEARERS
And those Beautiful Kerseys
now In I ill 1 I Shades They Ought to t flrg
2000
il rf r = 7
J ffi > JL 0
no
Aud so on throughout the House
Our owniuiportation of Celebrated Chas Mackintosh WaterProof Cape
Coats of which we have an elegant line are also included in this sale
II
I
terS 7
k
r C2Wu 2ur7I = = = I
Nos 61 63 6 1iga S1
UAHS LEADING OUTFITTERS w r
Ja 50 TURNERS
FillESbos tor Gent Wear
The Turner Shoe requires no breaking in It
cJ lends in accurate styles firstclass workman
7 ship and durability These are point which
401 commend themselves to every gentleman wear
Jrt t ing a fine supo
Perfect in Style and Workmanship 1
EASY FITTINC
AND DURABLE
ZIZCII ML L3 Sole Agents for 1 Utah i I
I4OE COAL U Hill p i5I 5 I
22 Ea First I South St
ELiAS ha4 mORRIS I
Has a handsome line of I
Wood iron and Slate
e Sl l rANTLES >
ALSO
FLOOR ND ART TJrLES
Call and see the finest display in this line in the West
No 21 West South Temple ete R
t I I
ag
o K THOMAS
26ft SJ 30 32
East First South St
1P ORTANTo
Special attention is called to my immense importa
tion of
1NTER CLOAKSat
he very latest cuts in PLUSH JACKETS as well as the usual
staple shapes Big drives in
LADIES NEWMARKETS
About onehalf of last seasons prices A large assortment of
CJEIILDREN9S CLOA S
At popular prices to suit all pockets A special lot of
Nobby Styles MISSES NEWMARKETS
A New Feature this season is f
t CfflLDEEFS COLORED PLUSH CLOAKS +
In all shades about 500 garments Also a large line of
Childrens PIUS Hoods Hats and Bonnets
In all shades All now being opened in the basement
where we are using ten electric ligbts Great Bargains
in Ladies Cloth Jackets and Silk Wraps fop early fall
wear Inspection is solicited
R c K s THOAS
Z 1 a Ua JltD l sl a f1 F 9 Shoe F acto iffj Y D
The Be t
The Cheape f aL Q Y
And JEoJtJtJteoraadea
All Styles Varieties and Prices
TI E
SEMIWEEKLY HERALD
Bt H lobar Editor
The SemiWeekly Herald contains all the
cream of the daily edition with other matter
specially edited for the issue It is published
I Wednesdays and Saturdays It is larger than
the regular daily and is in all respects a
I model country newspaper Its circulation is i
il the best attestation of its popularity
Ii Send for Catalogues of our extraordinary
I offers to subscribers for 1S9L
II
11000 Copies Per m
Are now being issued and the number
is steadily on the increase
Our Books and Pressrooms are
1
Open to Advertisers y
ECIIAL1 RATE
To Advertisers in tie Daily and Snnday Editions >
Subscription Price 3000 per Year
THE EMIVIEEKLY 1 1 HERALD
Is Unexcelled as an b Medium for
all who desire to reach the country public in i
any of the countres of Utah Idaho Wyoming
and many of those in Colorado Montana New
Mexico and Arizona
i
The Herald Co Publishers
a
G
t 1
r

xml | txt