OCR Interpretation


The Salt Lake herald. [volume] (Salt Lake City [Utah]) 1870-1909, August 31, 1897, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058130/1897-08-31/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

r
1 I1II t
Get Your Moneys Worth 1 1 the Object of Advertising
Herald This well as rule 10 gives applies dry you gxxxJs thc to stores Newspapers most for 11d your Tthe as TIlE SAiiJIF IIIII IIIKILILIJ i la Is the to reach great the home people newspaper The Hersild and
money I 1 tftere Ing Ure te no people better medium Tor reach
t 1
= = =
TWENTYEIGHTH YEAR SALT LAKE CITY UTAH TUESDAY AUGUST 31 1897 NUMBER 279
BIG JAM ON THE
TRAIL BROKEN
Number of Outfits Have Got
ten Over Skaguay
y
STEADY STREAM
OF MOVING HUMANITY
Skaguay Camp Has Three Thousand
Population
Fabulous Strike on a Tributary of
the HacMillan Biver Iffian Who
Stole a Sack of Flour Shot Down
like a Dog by the Vigilanco
Committee and His Body Left to
Rot In the SunAlready Comes a
Claimant for the Townsite of
SkagTiay Copper River Proper
ties
Seattle Wash Aug 30The follow
ing letter was received per steamer
Utopia today to the Associated Press I
Skaguay Aug 23The jam is broken
on the Skaguay trail A number of
outfits have gotten over and there is
a steady stream of moving humanity
mixed up in an almost indescribable
mass of horses of all sizes ages and
conditions mules steers mUch cows
goats and dogs also vehicles of every
fc description Three steamers are now
unloading on lighters which convey the
freight as near the shore as possible
where it is loaded on wagons or carried
over In the high tide The Utopia is
loading at the only wharf which is a
ehaky structure Two pile drivers are
at work on another dock which Is in
tended to be a substantial affair A
new sawmill got up steam for the first
time this morning Rough lumber is
worth 527 per thousand and cannot
be got half fast enough at any price
The city of tents is not being dis
placed l > ut reinforced by a city of
sfcacka of all sizes and degrees of
finish Sfcaguay is the bobm town of
Alaska Every man whose heart falls
hfm ruhen he enicounters the first
hardship has turned townslte boomer
Four weeks ago Skaguay was not
known today there are not less than
3000 people here in addition to those
on the ships in the harbor They have
surveyed off the townsite the first
comers having first choice The United
States fommissioner is Issuing some J
kind of a certificate fee 5 surveyor
another 5 then the squatter sticks up
Siis tent Shack or corral and is roady
to skin the first tenderfoot that comes
along Transfers by quit claim are I
quite common and as high as 200 has
been paid for a choice location
Skaguay has ail the usual accom
paniments of a frontier mining town
dance halls roulette faro stud poker
and craps find devotees r9ady to tempt
fortunes smiles
There Is no danger of a famine here
though there may be shortages in cer
tain lines On all sides smiling plenty
as if conjured by some enchanter
here abounds
3reat piles of hay grain flour bacon
sugar and all the necessaries are in I
stock apparently for some time to
I
come There are not less than 2000
horses at work on the Skaguay trail I
but it is hard to get any one to con
tact to deliver you over the summit
at any pricebut you can get over for
about 30 cents a pound if you are will
ing to wait and contract by sections
The packers at this end of the trail do I
not like to contract farther than the
first hill six miles out where one has
to hire another outfit j
At Dyea the Indians are moving
freight in an almost unbroken stream I
from the landing to Lake Linrterman
and it Is no trouble to contract to get I
ones entire outfit put over at one trip
for 30 to 35 cents per pound Xo one
should come expecting to get over this
fall for a less rate and no one should I
bring boats There are boats set up
knocked down in sections and single
boards on both trails from the landing
I to the base ot che summit but not one I
yet has teem > taken over
ON THE MACMILLAN RIVER
I Fabulously Rich Strikes Are Re I
ported There
Tacoma Aug 30A letter to the
ledger has just been received from the
north fork of the ilaeXIillan river
Alaska from George Lemmon ad °
dressed to his wife in south Tacoma
giving particulars of a fabulously rich
strike on this tributary of the MacMil
lan river
He and his partner went there from
the Yukon on information from an In
dian who accompanied them last spring
and he says that they have struck a
locality richer than the Klondike In
three months they have made a clean
jp of S5000
He says they have a large bucket
and a big can full of nuggets and al
j thougn they nave no scales they be
lieve it will reach the amount named
They have taked off five claims and he
tells his wife to send up four friends
whom he designates as quickly as pos
sible to locate th adjoining properties
the Jaw being that one man can locate
only one claim
The letter was rent down by the In
dian who took 5500 or 600 worth of
nuggets to lay in a fresh supply for the
inter Lemmon says he frill not be
out before next summer and that hs
friends can reach there by the middle
of October over the Chilkoot pass Mac
Millan is between 200 and 300 miles
south of the Klondike and in what un
til lately has been an unexplored re
gion
STOLE A SACK OP FLOUR
As a Consequence He Was Shot Like
a Dog
Seattle Wash Aug 3OAn unknown
man has been shot on the Skaguay trail
by a committee of vigilantes and his
bones are now rotting between a pile
of rocks within a few rods of the pass
This news was brought down by the
steamer Utopia which arrived this
morning at 6 oclock from Skaguay
The Utopia left Skaguay Aug 23 The
story in general is all that can be
learned the details being unknown
among the TJtoplas six passengers
Some time ago a sack of flour was sto
len Suspicion pointed to a man who
r r was encamped aear the summit A
committee of six were chosen to femt
out and punish the thief These men
went to the tent of the suspected man
and found the missing sack The man
begged for mercy but the committee
1
satisfied of his guilt decreed that he
be Immediately killed The man was
dragged rom the tent and tied up right
to a pole The committeemen Stood off
a short distance and at the word shot
together The thiefs body was pierced
in six places Feeling their duty done
and sick of their task the vigilantes
left at once not even waiting to put
the bleeding form beneath the ground
For three days it hung there in full
view of those passing with their packs
The odors emanating from the body
became so offensive that two men cut
it loose and carrying it up a hillside
covered it with a pile of stones
The steamer Detroit sailed for Dyea
and Skaguay this afternoon with 40
passengers
Says Keep Away
Seattle Wash Aug 30In speaking
01 the Klondike gold fields William
Ogilvie dominion surveyor of the
Northwest territory discourages all
strangers from going into that bleak
country He denies that any differ
ence regarding the boundary line exists
between Canada and the United States
He says gold has been found In a cer
tain zone in British Columbia running
through the Cariboo and Cassiar disv
tricts Project the axis of this zone
northwesterly and we touch the Teslin
lake Hootalinqua river Steward river
Indian creek Troandike SixtyMile
FortyMile American creek Seventy
Mile and Birch creek Nov it is highly
improbable that gold being found at all
those points the intervening spaces are
barren We have a zone of upwards of
500 miles in length some of it hi Alas
ka more of it in the Northwest terri
tory and much of it in British Colum
bia which will yet be the scene of nu
merous mining enterprises both quartz
and placer the former practically inex
haustible The conditions however are
most unfavorable There is a nine
months winter barrenness is almost
total so far as vegetable food is con
cerned the earth is bound in eternal
frost and the thermometer often
reaches 60 and 70 degrees below zero
For Copper River
Port Townsend Wash Aug ZOThe
steamer CWy of Topeka which sailed
at an early hour this morning for
Alaska took a party of 25 men from
Los Angeles Gal who will leave the
Topeka at Sltka and take passage on
the steamer Dora for Copper river
which < hey will fully prospect The
I party is headed by J D Brocks of
Los Angeles who went into the Cop
per river country 13 months ago Each
of the25 men has a full provision
fit for 16 mcn > th5 Brooks says the
Copper river country is richer than the
Klondike His party will be augmented
in September by 130 men all from Los
Al1 = des
Seattde Aug 30The latest expedi
tion from Seattle in search of gold will
turn its attention to the Copper river
Today Prank Porter of New York Jack
MocTe and W H Hamilton both of
Philadelphia purchased the sloop
Trixty T and will sail next week for
the Copper river They take provisions
for one year and will confine their ef
forts to discovering placer claims
He Claims Skaguay
San Francisco Aug 30A Chronicle
special from Victoria contains a signed
statement from Bernard Moore who
claims the townslte of Skaguay Be
says that ten years ago he made ap
plication for 160 acres of land in ac
cordance with the United States laws
as applied to Alaska had a legal sur
vey made and paid In the requisite 400
to the proper officials He had just be
gun to stock the place for a dairy when
the gold rush began and now thous
ands of citizens of Skaguay are claim
ing the land he paid the government
for
Steamboat Mail Service
Washington Aug 30A new steam
boat mail service between Juneau and
Dyea Alaska the first stretch on the
overland trail to the Klondike region
was announced by the postoffice de
partment today It provides for the
dispatch of the mails from Juneau
twice a month > immediately after the
arrival of the mail steamer from Se
attle and arriving in Dyea in 12 hours
Mails will leave Dyea twJce a month
within about 12 hours after arrival
from Juneau or in time to connect
with moil steamers at Juneau for Se
attle
3
ROUNDING UP CATTLE UK
SHERIFFS OP THREE COUNTIES
ON THE TRAIL
Charles Atwood Arrested Yesterday
In GTintaa County Have Been
Operating in Strawberry Valley
I
Special to The Herald
Vernal Utah Aug 30 The sheriffs of
Utah and Wasatoh counties have been
I
working In union with Sheriff Praece
of this county for the last few days in
quiet locating the whereabouts of a
gang of cattle thieves that have been
operating in Strawberry vailey where
Preston Nutter grazes his cattle
Charles Atwood has been arrested
and yesterday Sheriff Murdock of Ya
satch county started with him for He
ber Sheriff Preece left this
morning for White river to intercept
others of the gang who are supposed to I
be making their way into Colorado
PARADISE FOR BUMS
I
Contents of Kansas City Saloons
Flood the Streets I
Kansas City Mo Aug 3D Tn sa
loons in Karris City Kan were raided I
by the pollee this evening and 3000 north
of liquors was seized and soured into
tho gutters i i
Saloon furniture and fixtures filllns ten
bis dra s were seized and carted to po I
lice headquarters vrthere it will be burned
tomorosv j
The confiscations are under old injunc
tkms against the joints and the propne1 1
tons made permanent many months ago
and the property is to be destroyed with
out further process of law Simkvr ac
tion I will be taken asrainst some 70 other
joints I
I C = 0
I HELD FOR TRIAL
I Twentyfour Men Charged With I
Whitcapping Mormons I
Columbia S C Aug 30Twenty
four men charged with whitecapping
Mormons in Fairfield county were
given a preliminary hearing at Ridge
way today and bound over for trial in
200 each It developed at the hearing
that two women with guns stood off a
mob of 100 armed men who were search II
ing for the Mormons
Kansas State Bank Tails
foPhclSOtn Kan Aug OTl1a First
State bank of this city of wiJiich Sen
ator Royal Matthews la rVsMent faied
today with liabilities amounting to 2S
000 The bank is now in charge of Baok j
Commissioner John W BreidentDial
l
GRUESOME
EXPERIENCES
Several In Store For the
Luetgert Jurors
THEY WILL WATCH A
I
HUMAN BODY BOILED
BOILEDI I
How the Defense Will Meet the
II
Prosecution
Hopes to Completely Disprove the
Alleged Fact That a Human Body
Can be Almost Totally Annihil
ated by the Use of a Boiling So
lution of Caustic Potash Jury I
Secured and a Case Novel in the
Annals of Crime In Progress
Other Crimes
I
t
Chicago Aug ZOThe trial of Adolph
Luetgert for the murder of his wife I
began in earnest today the preliminary
work of securing a jury having been I
4
o
o
Q
I I
I
I
I
1J 1
i
I
j
I
completed Long before the case was
called the corridors of the court build
ing were thronged with people anxious
to gain admittance
Contrary to the expectation of the
state the jury will be asIted by the
defense to witness an evneriment In
the vat in the basement of the sausage
factory This is to be the result of an
experiment conducted by Lucterts at
torneys Saturday and ypcteiUn The
body of a man of about Sirs Luet
gents age ard ight iho mei 0 atu
by violence Thursday was talre to th >
factory at 607 Diversey avenue and im
mersed in a solution of caustic potash i
The result exceeds their expectations j i
The experts reported that after belling j i
the body in a 15 per cent solution of
the potash for some length of time
three and onehalfhours and under the I
same circumstances as the state alleges
Luetgert disintegrated the body of his
wife the complete skeleton of the ca
daver remained intact and the solu
tion had but little effect upon the cloth
lnfAs
As a result of the test the defense
will it is said ask Judge Tuthill to
remove his court and the jury to the
basement of the big sausage factory for
a few hours and witness another exper
iment which the defense claims will
completely disprove the states theory I
of disintegration
CALM AND COMPOSED
Luetgert was calm and composed
when he was brought into court and
he had apparently been greatly re I
freshed by Sundays respite from the
daily court room ordeal Assistant
States Attorney McEwan formally
opened the case for the state Op the
wall close to the jury box were hung
large maps of the Luetgert sausage
factory the Luetgert home and all the
surroundings of the place where it is i
charged the prisoner killed his wife
and then destroyed her body The at il
torney for the state began with the
disappearance of Mrs Luetgert on May
1 and next described the visit on May
r f j
r L l
f
4 of Dietrich Blcknese brother of Mrs
Luetgert when he called to see his sis
ter and discovered that she had disap
peared He7 dwelt on the apparent in
difference of the husband his state
ment that he had not informed the po
lice but had hired two detectives and
his invitation Bicknese to call again
in about a week when he would tell
him if anything had been discovered
concerning the whereabouts of his sis
ter
Attorney McEwan told the jury that
Luetgerts statement that he had hired
two detectives to search for his wife
would heBraKen false
Mr McE wan said it is the theory of
the state that Mrs Luetgert accom
panied her husband into the factory
between 1036 and 11 celock About
1030 her little son Louis returned from
the circus and saw her sitting In the
kitchen The conversation of the boy
with his mother was interrupted by
Luetgert who came in and ordered the
boy to bed Before going to sleep the
boy heard his father descending the
back stairs toward the factory where
he had slept for years Mr McEwan
said it is cite theory of the state that
Mrs Luetgert descended > the stairs at
the same tim andwent to the factory
The boy did not hear her steps because
she wore house slippers which made no
noise Luetgert and his wife were seen
in the alley in the rear of the house a
few minutes later They were seen
gong through a gate which led tb no
place except the factory
The attorney for the state then de
tailed the movements at the Lueisert
factory the running on the steam to
the vat the sending of Watchman
Bailk shortly after to the drug store
an3 Eaiiks rubsequent errand to a
drug store all of which kept him out
of the factory for an hour and a half
He was away when Mrs Luetgert was
last seen alive In the alley
ALLEGED MOTIVE
The alleged motive and operating
If l
ii4t
I
1j
LJ 5
i i
I
1 I u tt
I
I reason which actuated Luetgert ac
cording to the theory of the state was
then described Mr ileEwon said Luet
gert despised hs wife He had treated
her with violence as the evidence of
the state will show He had no affection
for her and lived alone in the factory
There the attorney said he had been
visited by other women Judge Vincent
objected to this statement but Judge
Tuthill overruled the objection Mr
McEwan paid a witness would testify
that he KUV Luetgetri choke his wife in
the chicken house back of the resdence
She said
You need rot toll me as you did that
man for I have no money
This caused Luetgrert to say that she
would rot be allowed to betray him
Judge Vincent objected to this state
ment as foreign to the case and not
proper evidence but was overruled by
the court
When 3Ir McEwan concluded At
torney Vincent announced that no
opsning address would be made at pre
mt for the defense
The first witness was then called TV
H Haafe of the cIty map department
Who testified to the correctness of the
drawings being used by the prosecution
DEFENDANT WAS INDIFFERENT
I Then the afternoon session began
the first witness called was Diedrich
Bicknez brother of Mrs Luetgert He
told the jury of his visit to the house
of Luetgert on May 4 to see his sister
There he met the sausage maker and
talked with him for some time before
he was informed that Mrs Luetgert
had disappeared Bicknez said Luet
gert told him he did not know what
had become of his wife He had last
seen her at S oclock the Saturday
evening previous Luetgert said he did
I not believe she had gone away with
i some other man but thought she had
wandered away The witness said he
asked the prisoner what he had done
to find his wife and was Informed that
he had rot told the police of her dis
appearance Instead he said he had
paid two private detectives 5 each and
they would do more than the police
would accomplish
I The witness said Luetgeri told him
he had not looked to see if his wife
had taken any clothing with her ex
cept the dress she had on when he last
saw her He had not visited any place
or made any inquiries
I I Bicknes told hyi story in i a simple
I straightforward way that made him an
impressive witness
YOUNG LUETGERTS STORY
Louis Luetgert 12 years of age the
bright son of the prisoner was called
next He is a remarkably bright lad
for his age and produced something of
I a sensation in concluding his testi
mony and it is believed caused counsel
for the prosecution to regret having
placed him on the stan l The boy him
self has already been examined twice
as to his knowledge of his mothers
disappearance and in neither case did
he refer to having heard his mother
about the House afterhe had been sent
to bed Today he recounted how he
Continued on Page 6
i i 4 1
ti >
S
j 1
1cONFERENCE OF
LABOR LADmSI
It Was a Very Busy Day
Yesterday
PLATFORM NOW
I BEING FORMULATED
I
It Will Doubtless be Wade Pub
lic Today
Sympathetic Strike Is Hardly Looked
I forEven if a Majority Favored
it the Convention as a Body Is
Powerless Ratchfords Plan to
Aid the Men Now in WantDebs
Social Democracy Has a Large
Following Sovereign Tired of
Resolutions and Wants Action
TakenSpecial Session of Con
gress May be Asked forSome
Fiery Talk
Sit Louis Aug n The conference of
labor leaders whi began this morn
ing had a busy day and tonight the end
isin sight What the conference has
accomplished if anything is in doubt
It Is not believed the leaders have at
tained any definite result and in fact
the president of one of the national or
ganizations said the failure of the con
ference was a foregone conclusion
I should feel very much chagrined
said this gentleman if I had any part
in the convening of this conference
The committee on resolutions and
plan of action was at work all after
noon and evening and tonight Mr
Eoverefgn announced that they had
formulated a plan but declined to give
any details The platform it is ex
pected will be submitted to the con
vention tomorrow morning The 14 dif
ferent organizations represented in the
convention make an unwieldy body
and it is evident all of them cannot be
satisfied > with a platform formulated by
five nun representing as many branches
of organized labor
Mr Ratchfords plan of petitioning
I
President McKinley to convene an extra
session of congress to enact measures
providing for the settlement of the
present labor difficulties cr as he puts
it To define the rights of citizens if
any did not meet with the approval
he had hoped for and it is not believed
the plank will be incorporated in the
platfprm I >
Although present in the convention
all day Mr Debs did not speak ncr did
he p iin an appearance at the nights
mass meeting where he was widely ad
vertised to make an address
He is represented on the resolutions
committee however by Mr Berger and
as he has remained pretty close to the
gentlemen composing that committee
it is safe to say his social democracy
idea will be represented
It is thought an adjournment will be
reached some time tomorrow
1 The Proceedings
St Louis Mo1 Aug 30E V Debs I
of Terre Haute Ind M D Ratchford
of Columbus 0 and W D jVIahon of I
Detroit were among the delegates to the
labor conference who arrived this morn
ing I am out of it to a certain extent
said Mr Debs this morning I am no
I longer affiliated with any labor body
but have oome simply as a guest of the
conference under the general call
I Is there any probability of a sympa
thetic strike 7 was asked
I hardly think so in fact these dele
I gates are not empowered to order a I
strike They can do no more than re
I port back to their respective bodies the
se se of the convention
1 RATCHFORDS PLAN
Mr Ratchford has a plan which he
will probably present to the confer
J ence calling upon every working man
I and woman in the country to contribute I
one cent per day of their wages to a
fund for the relief of the striking min
ers This money he thinks will amount
to between 51000 and 2000 per day
Part of this fund will be used to keep
men at work among the strikers in the I
Pittsburg district where the operators r
propose to start their mines with non
union mei In other words the camps
there will be maintained with the hope
of eventually influencing those now at
work to quit
Much disappointment expressed at
headquarters over the nonarrival of
Samuel Gompers but It Is believed lIe
will be in St Louis this afternoon or
tonight
DEBS DEMOCRACY
There is no denying the fact that
social democracy movement headed
by Mr Debs has a large following and
it would not be a surprise to see that
new venture gain control of the meet
ing An effort will be made to amalga
mate all labor todies represented and
to this end a resolution looking to the
appointment of a general conference
committee will be presented some time
during the convention by Mr Steinbliss
of St Louis My idea is said Mr
Steinbliss to have one or two d le
gates from each branch of organized
labor form a general conference com
mittee While I hardly think such a
I committee if appointed by the confer
ence will do anything at this meeting
they will get together later By that
time our ideas will have crystallsed
and some definite platform upon whicn
general amalgamation of labor could j
stand would be formulated It is bound
to come We must be united I
Chairman Steinbliss of the local
committee of arrangements called the I
conference to order at 10 oclock About
100 people were scattered about the
hall not all of them however were
delegates Mr Stelnbliss suggested
that as the call for the convention had
been issued hurriedly and as mcny of
the delegates were yet unadvised as to
the meeting place and hour an ad
journment be taken till 11 oclock
Shortly after 11 the convention was
again called to order
Mr W B Prescott president of the
National Typographical union of In
dianapolis was chosen temporary
chairman and W C Pearce of Colum
bus temporary secretary
Considerable controversy arose over
the naming of a committee on resolu
tions which although the convention
was not yet permanently organized
was moved by one of the delegates
There were amendments to the effect
that the convention adjourn until 1
oclock and that the hour be made 2
oclock and in the midst of this parlia
mentary tangle Delegate Sovereign
shouted Im sick and tired of reso
lutions l this is the time for action I
move Mr Chairman that the motion
to appoint a committee on resolutions
TH HERALD BULLETIN
PAGE ONE
Latest From the Klondike
Instructions to TTncompahgre Com
missioners
Adolph Luetgerts Trial
Conference of Labor Leaders
IAGE TWO
Moonshiners Murder Deputies
General Sporting News
Curley Glenn Ret
PAGE THREE
Back From Alaska Ports
Wall Street Quotations
Utah Girl at Klondike
The Chinese Exclusion Laws
Editorial PAGE FOUR
PAGE FIVHL
Affairs of the County
In Railway Circles
PAGE SIX
Opening of the City Schools
Cases of Marital Infelicity
Among the Coal Strikers
PAGE SEVEN
State NewsPAGE
PAGE EIGHT
Trial of the Griffin Divorce Case
Local Politics
be amended to read on resolutions and
plan of action II
This brought out a flood of amend
ments and motions but the whole mat
ter was finally tabled and the meeting
adjourned until 2 p m at which hour
the report of the committee on creden
tials was presented
The report after some discussion
was adopted The general report
showed also the presence of one wom
an delegate Mrs Mary Jones of Chi
cago wha represents the Social Dem
ocracy The temporary organization
was then made permanent and the
ohairmanread the call for the conven
tion
It was moved and seconded that a
committee on resoluMons to be made I
from one member from each organiza
tion be named each delegation to
choose their member This was amend
ed by Delegate Stephen of Philadel
phia to read and plan of action
Mr Mahon of Detrctt objected to
this committee as unwie dy and mId
he was perfectly satisfied to leave the
matter of recalutions to a committee of
five to be selected by he chair Ha
amended the resolution to that effect
If you are going inito the resolut on
business said Mr Mahon you had
better go home
Mr Motions amendment was carried
on a division as was the amendment
of Mr Stephens
The cha rman > ften named an the
eommittee on resolutions and nina of
action W G Pearce of the minr3
W D Mahon of the street ra 1cvay men
Victor Berger of Milwaukee cvho rep
resents the Social Democracy in hcsc
favor Mr Debs declined G C Clemens
of Toneka representing < the PopulLits
and James R Soveregn
SPECIAL SESSION OF CONGRESS
Mr Ratchford then took the floor
He wert over the miners strike from
its inception to the present day and
dwelt particularly upon government I
by injunction He pleadd for p omnt
action and coming to the point oY his I
Argument advocated i special session
of consrecs as the bes and In tfacc
the only lef
I believe said Mr Ratchford a
special session of congress is necessary
to define the rights of th0 people of this
I beJieve if
countryif they have any beleve i
suffiem time were gIven the president
of tine United States will call n scfcial
sees kzt of consrefei anJ art UIKTI the
mae of injunctions and find mom
of relieving existing troubes in th
labor world In care of refusal said
Mr Ratchford impressively after an
outburst had subsided it will then bs
time to consider more extreme measures
ures I am in favor if the Drerdsnt
refuses to call congress together of a
complete paralysis of business I be
lieve in a sympathetic strike
FIERCE HARANGUE
Mr Patrick ONeill of Rich Hill Mo
who said he represented 1503 organ
ized picks favored a labor revolution
He was a socialist he sara and be
lieved in the miners taking t insrs dn
their own hands if necessary His fierce
harangue pleased the audience greatly
Mr Sovereign put himself OT cord
a opposed to Mr Raichfcrds plan
He believed this would be the last con
vention to be held under present condJ
Continued on Page 2
I limlY1UOUS rn PPL TtdWIN6
Condition of American Worktagmen I the State of
7 Indiana I
Denver Cole Aug 30A special to the News from Lebanon Ind says
An immense meeting was held tonight at the opera house in behalf of the
starving coal miners in Indiana Judge Thomas J Terhune made a state
ment of the condition of the miners as he found It while making his investigation
gation as Governcr Mounts special commissioner In the course of < his ad
dress he said
There are 8000 families In this state in destitute condition Thirty
thousand people are literally starving A few years ago they received 125
per ton now the average price paid is about 35 cents per ton
A good miner can make 1 a day and dS allowed fo work two or three
days each week They are compelled to trade at company stores and the
prices they pay are left entirely to the mine operators The miners admit
that they cannot live on the present scale of wages
A large subscription to the relief fund was raised
T
t r
I i C
tMUST EXPLAIN
TO THE UTfS
How the Uncompahgre Com
missioners Will Proceed
PAYMENT REQUIRED 1
FOR ALLOTMENTS
The Indian Office Tried to Defeat
This Requirement
Commissioners Instructed t Ass
ble the Indians In Council and
Explain the Situation to Them
An Objectionable Provision of the
Instructions Stricken Out Utah
Mi Site Case Decided
Special to The Herald
Washington Aug 30The commis
sioner of Indian affairs has formally
a ars hs foHy
designated Commissioner James Jet
freys of Missouri as chairman or < t3ie
Uncompahjrre allotment commission
and he has received special instruc
tions to govern him in rendering the
accounts
Captain William H Beck who is1 act
ing Indian agent for the Uintah and
Ouray agency is under instructions to
offer the ccmmlsekHiers every assist
ance in his power Blank township
plats and blank allotment sheets hove
tEen forwarded to the agency for the
te
use of the commissioners Maps of
Utah and blanks for weekly reports
will also be mailed reDor
The commissioners are Instructed to
employ a sucveycir assistants and in
terpreters these to be maid out of the
balance of the appropriation for the
commission of 1891
It is the opinion of the Indian office
that none of the ITncompuhKres will
desire allotments outside oi the reser
vation i but if they do the commission
ers are directed to allot them lands
lands anywhere in Utah excepting mineral
MUST EXPLAIN
The commissioners first duty will be
to assemble the Uncompahgres in
council and explain to them the proVisions
Visions of the act of 1897 and the ne
cessity iihat exists fo them to take al
lotments at once if they desire to re
turn any of their lan within the Un
compahge reservation proper 03 other
wise they will b opened to settlement i
on the firs of April next
With regard t the payment required
for their allotments the commissioners
directed to expiatn to the Un
ers are drected to exp theIjn
compge that the Indian office en
deavored to secure a waiver of the r
quiremeivt but that congress refused l
to remit the amount and therefore no
alternative The commissioners will 1
also call their attention to the fact t
that d majority of the Uncompahgre J
male adults ossemted to this require ft
ment jI 1881
After this if the commissioners c
ST the consent of the tribes o J
that of any of them they will proceed 1
allotments
to make allotments
The assistant attorney for the inter
OT department has expressed the p
on that the word agricultural vs used
in the act of 1887 in a sense that in
cluded grazing and the opinion will
govern the ccmmissiSoners appointed
FUNDS FOR EXPENSES tP
The Indian office has with difficulty
arranged for the payment of salary f
and expenses of the commissioners J
Ccngress made no appropriation for
CCTges
the speoial mrrpoje and the Indian J
office will pre expenses out of a
balance of 2300 left unexpended by
the last commission and 15000 carried
te the current appropriation bill for f
the survey and subdivision of Indian It
reservations and of lands to be allotted l
to Indians l
PROVISION STRICKEN OU
The secretary of interior approved h
aH the instructions to the commission
ers and drafted by the Imltan bureau Ji
reading as follows
except that 3 provision i
lows was stricken out
I land is svr locate a to be sue
ceptjble of irrigation it is believed that
40 acres of land would be ample allow I
ance of agricultural land and the In
aoe dians should be advised to select not
more than that quantity of such land
However If they desire the full Quan
tity they have the riff tot to select it 1
UTAH MIL SITE CASE
Secretary of the Interior Bliss today 1
affirmed the decision of the land com
afrmed te
missioner in the Silver Star mill site
S from te Salt Lake City land 1
dlstrict The applicants for the mill
remiblish notice of
to
site are required reDbIsh nOC
ar
application naming a day for malnns
applktian proof application to refer the case
to the board of equitable abdication
iSApostoffice established at
A has been estblshed t
potoffice
Jordan Big Horn county Wyo and i
tel Louts Odn Duhis commissioned poatmaa i I
0
I
TRIAL OF BOB MEEKS
Identified as One of the BTontpelier
Bank Robber
Special to The Herald
Paris Ida Aug 30The district
conit i now in session here Bob
Meefe one of the supposed Montpelier
bank robbers i being tried today Dis
trjt Attanyey Budge i prosecuting
John A Baprfey
sTsted by Attorney on BaAley
who appears In the case in behalf ot
the ban and Insurance company At
torneys R S Spence and T L Glenn
appear for tine defense
appr witnesses were examined for the
crcecution eight of whom positively
Identified the prisoner as one of the t
three who robbed the Montpelier bank t
The defense had only two witnesses
<
both from Wyoming and who judging
from the testimony given have been
with the prisoner and i
doing business
doinr buiness tne prue a
who ore sunnosed to have got money
from him and invested it in cattle J
I
Their evidence Is very conflicting A
night session is now In progress an
the case will be given to the jury o
nirttt and a conviction is expected 1
v
Repulse of Rebels
Simla Aug 30The column under
Colonel Richardson and a detached
party which were sent to relieve the
police posts at Lakka and Saifaldra
found them hard pressed by Orakrais
A sharp conflict ensued between the re
lieving force and the rebels resulting in
levi repulse of the latter with consider
able loss The posts were relieved and
their garrisons withdrawn

xml | txt