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The Salt Lake herald-Republican. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1909-1918, December 18, 1909, Image 10

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058140/1909-12-18/ed-1/seq-10/

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TO THE HERALDREPUBLICAN SALT LAKE CITY UTPH SATURDAY DEC 18 1909
BIGGEST CHRISTMAS TREE EVER IS S PROVIDED l
1 BY TEACHERS FOR FREE PiARTEN CHILDREN
art
s
r
t
d t
4
W Y
i
MISS NELLIE SHERMER
Tno little towheaded boys stumbled
toss the snow and ice of Thin West
street yesterday afternoon following a
< re or w of other tots who were hiking
AUI unusual haste toward the Sixth ward
IJRVf1 l The two little boys clearly did
i > t belong but they followed the crowd
110 I I the chapel
Vnd what do you spoae they found
Hipr in the center of the room with
a irelt ot little red chairs all about it
was the tvtsst Christina tree anyone
cer saw aching i from the floor clear I
i the eiliag and biding with the
vvlght or presents Santa Claus had i
i cn here < and gone before the little ones I
an ed but even his pusence would not I
Lrve added to the joy Nothing could I
ou secthr Free Kindergarten aasocia i
tm > wldiI i has a school for tots at 432 I
Smith Fourth West street prepared a
e and Miration for the pupils The I
s pool was ton small anil tin Sixth ward
impel 1 t 44 Soutii Third West was used
rstead II krt Miss Nellie Shermer the
jdlJd rglrttl1 teacher and her two as I
Mianfa Miss Vera Feuger and Mum i
Alice ala planted the tree imbedded its I
rots with cotton snow and oranges and
niples tad bedecked Its branches with
resent i
The I iMr M were on hand early as
ids expo dd t I in really no one at all was
> te The little red chairs were soon filled I
+ itii fortyfour eager expectant little
m i and the happy circle about the big i
uritmae tree was nearly ready to begin i i
fun when the two towheaded tots I
it seen at the door They didnt really I
Lng to the kindergarten but they are I
mlf crs of th school of humanity and j
mise they weitnt barred The cirI I
t
I
1 k
i
>
>
J
i
n
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MISS ALICE GRAY
cle was swelled just a wee bit to Kt them
in and then the fun began
In the bigger chairs around by the wall j i
sat lou of proud mothers and many of i
the women who have devoted days and
days to making the free kindergarten a I
success
Now were all going to be very quiet
said Miss Shermer and we are going to i
show our mothers just how nicely we can
act Were all going to sing Santa
Claus she added and then they sang
lap clap your hands and sing with i
glee I I
For Christmas Is coming and happy arc i i
we I
After the children had sung some more
songs and the mothers ranged about the I
walls had accumulated more happy pride
Miss Shermer paid I
Now listen The silence was magical
and only the noise of escaping breath <
broke the stillness
When your name is called she ad
monished holding up a finger to show
that she was in fearful earnest yon i
must come and get the present and take
it to your mamma Now I am sure none j
of us has told our mammas or papas t
< a
i
s1
I
C
I
i I
I
MISS VERA EEUGER
shoat tins surprise and a score of
h ads shook vigorously and silently
The secret had not leaked out as all
teally great n ° spaper stories do
Then the Ito t I ce teachers distributed
many pretty limes that had ben made
tt kindergarten b > the children all by
ihemselvt for their papas and mammas
Ii was a tn m > ndous surprise and when
one aiui anther of tin pretty things
were dumped into the lap of smiling
mothers the secret was outin all its de
tails
Then when all of the pretty things had
1 UII given out the Christmas tree was
still heavy with presents The childiens
turn came Never was a Christmas tree
110 bounteous in its shower of toy and
book and dolls and things Some of the
children had two or three present apiece
and the two towheaded tots l who were
taken in and charmed were laden with
pretty things
Little Sam the Italian boy had a me
chanical bug that jumped from his hand
and tried to hide among the oranges
But Sam understood the discipline of the
kindergarten and didnt try to rescue
the bus He let the teacher get It be
cause had he started after it h2 would
have tramped on sacred and forbiddcr
ground beneath the enchanted branches
of the tree
The children sang the Goodbye Dear
Playmate song and went out Into a
brighter happier more cheerful world
than it had ever bean before The music
for this rollicking recessional was pro
vided by the burns and the whistles and
the clicking of the mechanical bug be
longing to Sam >
Away up Third West street at the head
of the procession of children were two
towheaded tots hastening homeward to
display what Santa Claus had left them i
OPENING ADDRESS I
BY THE PRESIDENT I I i I
Conference of National Civic
Federation to Be Held in
January
GREAT INTEREST SHOWN
STATEMENT BY SETH LOW ON
THE OBJECTS SOUGHT
Washington Dec IS President Taft
as agreed to make the opening address I
dress of the three days conference of
National Civic Federation to be
i > 1 in thin city January 17 18 and 10
The President is in hearty sympathy 1
W itii I the purpose of this organization
me i Mi > Yemen t for uniform state laws
and its speech will sound the key I
note of the conference I
in cuTinectiou with the conference it
i < < of interest that Governor Willson
of Kentutky chairman of the special
t ommitte appointed at the notable
confer iui of state governors in Wash
ington last winter to arrange for fu
Iilrp meetings has just issued a call
r tin niernors to gather in Wash
Itgton i at the time the federation is in
s io
lIwg ti r delegates to the confer
ee oi ui part of wage earners will
relIlallves of the American
FfderutiJl I i of Labor United Mine
1orkers i oi America Order of Ball
odd iundu tor Granite Cutters In
inatiniil I association of America
Miotlui i l Hl 1 oI U ail road Trainmen In
t rnati 1 Biotli rhood of Locomotive
1 Iginr nialraniated Association
ni S trf1 i I kula Kmpli M of America
iiiernai I i iiinil Brotherhood of Statlon
arc I Fiii men Bricklayers and Masons
international union Brotherhood of Ix
i oinotn i 1iieiiien and l Inginemen In
T 1 nation < ti Association < > f Machinists
Coot ni < I Slide Work is union Iron
bolder union of Not America In I
1 erlat nil Tvj pograpl i it union Glass
Ktti iiin iv us xniitlon of the
i sited M iiis and < tiiida and the
lnile I < > 1 i inM liiixl < ii Carpenters and
Jn = t i in rica
On i PHI if employers there will
l > tot nfatins > f the United States
teei l onition he New York Cn
t > 1 i i 0L < on olidated Gas com
Ial a X iinal Hty bank Cbleace
nook Tinni I R Pacific railroad Postal
11 1 e p i uil Cable company Chi
KO tv Xoia fstrn railroad ErIe
Hrld > i i H South tarollna Cotton
laic i t sera Association National
lath nl 1 the BuIJdIDTra Em I
ocer o iition
art toV preside f the dra
i i > < < 1 Ir 1 tI o fo Inl t3temeftt
Sol n t scope i d i purposes of
It l
Mr Lows Statement
On n the P how Iody
Mr Lw expressed L I ItallUrF a1 tine
Treshlp1I willingnl > o addres II
IIl1feltiI end mad he follow
laltJn f the se and i i rpc
r th XIin Ch federation 1
Th ttloltal 1 I i 1 CitI 1 Iedelation La
h ra nt lI hrliere t one of 1I i
scat I 11narn tue s with islwI
r 1 Cdll r s a w II roufnot I
i the n Its for r nable
hieldtlut Ly the Iii en 10111 r
tlp 1lIll1n uI many ejects of ennl
IItIu jilt I
10 l + xtnple if 01 Iduta LiTo
key hange in i law of taal
d sr or of tnsigenee il rv
° nit ini greatly t m l inger it Ian
11 111111 i g indiistrleh I t if the um
t n till1 industrial LIIts will more
rreMji dinK n ulorn ie saint lill s
> on of then is IKI > to be enian
tled ml 1 the who < i > untr > may h l e
tratl benefited
Th tiiie has coal a Itn i pad state
ni It I i late on nr MUI a of common
sureI i from the point i f view of one
I
< if a f Jd i v of states i in LeI than from
te point of view Ot t individualism
that i s uCflcllt Done who
has not given part i r attention to
this sahiPt will bt t rpltaed at the
I
great i i age of matt a a to which
t1 cot niioii life of the country has
grown i > to the noint of needing unl I
firm + I f pisatiun hv group of states
if not tr all the states
To rruno rate i few of the Impor
i it Tie great movement
foi t P u s t u n of our natural re i
J
J
sources inaugurated by President I
Roosevelt cannot be carried to its per
fect consummation until these states
iiiopt uniform laws upon the subjects
of forestry water power and reclama
tion of land by Irrigation
States Must Do Their Part
In the effort to propose suitable
amendments to the Sherman antitrust
act our committee was not unmindt
ful of the fact that If satisfactory
amendments were finally jaad their
effect would be nullified in many im I
portant instances unless lira antitrust
laws of the various states were made
to substantially conform Probably no
better illustration could be given than
that of railway regulation The In
terstate Commerce commission of
course can deal only with interstate
while the states can deal only with
state traffic The confusion and
conflict without uniform action can
readily be imagined
The National Association of State
Bank Supervisors and the American
Bankers association have come to
agreement on certain propositions upon
which they desire uniform state legis
lation In the matter of insurance
both life and fire national associa
tions have been organised and in the
latter case are working with the state
supervisors of insurance in an effort
to secure state uniformity The agri
cultural ganixatlona the wholesale
grocers the wholesale druggists nod
a number of other national organisa
tions are working for uniform pure
food laws
The labor organisations want uni
form workmens compensation acts
uniform legislation as to guarding dan
gerous machinery factory inspection
convictmade products regulation of
the employment of women and children
etc etc The American Medical asso j
elation desires uniformity on registra
tion and preservation of vital statis
tics The National Grange the Ameri
can Automobile association and the
American Roadmakers association
have united in the demand for uniform
state legislation on the regulation of
motor vehicles and the building of
good Tads throughout the country 1
Exerts on taxatIon are agreed to I
day that uniform state legislation on
the subject is absolutely essential
It Is not the purpose of the Na
tional Civic Federation to pass on all
the various problems referred to but
to educate public opinion a IS to the
farreaching Importance of uniform ac
tion by the states and to bring to
gether and federate the various in
terests that are striving for uniformity
in matters that make for the public
weal I
J t
+ T r y
I i INCORPORATIONS I fr fl I
i r
The Kimball Investment company filed
articles of incorporation in the county
clerks office yesterday with a capital
tock of 100600 in 100 shares of which
40 are held as treasury stock The of
ficers are Geneva Kimball U shares
president Douglas B Kimball 100 shares
vice president and Edwin E Kimball of
Schenectady N Y with 160 shares as
the third director May 11 and Scott P
Kimball holding 19 sHare each are i I
incorporators Charlas L Rood is secretary
I
retary and treasurer The capital is sub
scribed in taking over several pieces of
real estate in Salt Lake i
MINES COMPANY FACES
TWO SUITS IN COURT
Two suits were brought by the Na
tional Hank of the Republic In the dis
trict court yesterday one against the
Scott Mines company of Nevada and A I
W Scott for ir3406i on a note dated
August 21 1909 and due on November 9
and the other against the Scott Mines I
company A W Scott and Jesse L Scott I
for I50UO on a promissory note dated Oc I
tober 11 1909 and due on December 15
I MORE
HERALDREPUBLICANS
are read in the homes of Salt Lake City
I than any other paper
I
Salt Lake Theatre 1Tpcr Grotle ll I
Igr
I
MATIXISE TODAY 2slS I
TOXIGIIT LAST TIMU
BAILKV C AVSTIX i
In the Nelr York and Cbicao Mu I
sical Success
THE TOP 0 i TH1 WORLD
THE SHOW OF THE YEA It
73 People Mostly Glrbi
Prices Eening 50c to 150
Matinee 2c to 1 Seats now selling
moth hones 3663
I
I
I THEATRE
AITVAACED VAUDEVILItS
MATIM3R TODAY U15
KVlillV KlKMNCi MilS
The trent Cnieeilo Keno Wnltli Si
llnl Godfrey Melrose
C Company Williams
Gen Krt A Tucker
La Vine Perry d White
Lee Millar R Co
The Kinodrome Orpheum Orchestra
Matinee prices Uc 25c 50c
Nlpht nriosSc W1 Tr
COLONIAL
The Famous Play
Human Hearts
i
Matinee today 215
i
Tonight 815
I
Next Week Bernard Daly
i
rii THE
s SHUBERT
Opposite the Postoffice
Seas AVeek Mallneei
edncsilay nnd AHIHS
rnt and Lee Shubert
Inc Present
UK
C II UUES CIIKKHY
inl the Original New
York Company in
TilE 11ACHHIOH
Ily lyre FIlcli
Fran I on sale today
=
I
ltIr 1 iii 1 fMHltil It1 >
Imperial Vaudeville I
7It VTTU Ci GOOD tCTS7
ndu < ling
Will Rossiters
BUNCH OF KIDS I
MoLallan Carsons
Scenic Novelty
THE AWAKENING OF
THE TOYS JJ
Kern or the Hurtling of Rome
MATINEE TODAY
Two Shows Tonight
1 I1 i s Night 10 2 O e matinees
1
j
P
> t l c
r
i Clearance Sale of Shoes
Johnston Murphy
and other well known makes
All 800 750 and
700 Grades 600
All 650 and 600
Grades 500
All 500 Grades 425
All 4800 Grades 350
All 350 Grades 300
High Cut Boots
Including Johnston 00 Dis
Murphys and Putnams 70 count
This is a genuine shoe sale No old stockevery i
thing this seasons models in all the different
leathers from two of the best manufacturers in
the country
GRAY BROS CO
ldl t3 1 V 11V
258260 South Main
1
il
p
1i
J u 1IK
Girls fa 1
w4 Do You
Want a
i Scooter 1
k
The Belt fi
r
Sled Made
I
i Worth 350
I
Just a
I i < 811 Little I Effort
m t i i < t i I 1Jl Will Secure One
> w4 > MMl wsifet iii ltffii
1 Xnme 0 To every boy or girl who
Add1 willleC11re five new sub
i
i tttiben to The HBRAJLD
2 Name f c BJPUBLIOll eolleet
Addi e i t O I ink from each 76c the reg
o alr price for one month
3 K RIDe A l 0 It jfc t o
1 7 r we will give a Scooter
tltlreua ii ii rf I
worth 1350 It will cost
j 4 Name f nothing Jnst a little
Adflrer c effort after ichooL Go to
r 1I 0 f
work and see how easy
5 Xame yon otji MUTI a new sled
Address Yotrrfritadi will help you
Bring the names and the money collected to
THE HERALDREPUBLICAN office and get your sled
<
i
Orpheum Tickets Given Away by the
HeraldRepublican
Somewhere In the classified columns
of every issue of The H rald Republican
will bf foiuii an order tJr tw > tats at
I
> n
> tn
n
t
the Orpheum theatre good for either j
matinee of evening performance on date
of issue The person whose nam ap >
pears in this order will please pr srni a
copy of the ad to The Helaid Repub
I lican office before 6 o < l > t In c to >
I
=
c
ether with a positive identification
your last subscription receIpt will d
Read the fMa ified a wrtirnts ia
115 issue Perhaps yu n re i ther
HEl ALD KFFTJLK AN WANT
AV = 1KING KLML1 I i IKU
> 2id
> < 7
MARRIAGE LICENSES
John v otHvan Milwaukee Wis Na
omi Jai a I homa City
Orson Speiu u J Annie Kylen Bluff
Dal Utah
Perry Memmott Skipio May Perkins
Pleasant Green
PROMINENT PIONEERS OF HEBER GUY 1
I I R iH j
H
I fiF ii J T7 H
w
ta
r
e a
y
3f yea
Y
i
MR AND MRS JOHN M MURDOCH
Mrs Murdoch died Friday at the age of 81 years
The cMnpanyinff Illustrations show Mr and Mrs John M Murdoch nfonoero
or i IEI vh t recently observed their golden wedding anniversary at thr time
th > ab pi < Mts were taken Mrs Murdoch died at Hebr Tntsli and was
innifd I riiisija > siu was more Oian so vtrs rM i t in he 1 husband ini I
< OHIo > to Pta h tn + m Bull nd 1 in i 581 Hr ir 1 Mr 94r u h vv rr iminB th r I
pru I i > in ii pion i H rr in thf tit md 11 u1 i it Mr M b i i lulls a LIb and
crl iI n 11 t i the 8 > r1 Jf 11r im j i > < la1 i ht I 01
i
f
<
< 110
IMONTANA r PROJECT
i ABOUT COMPLETED
i I
I
Water Will Be Ready for 10
000 Milk River Acres Early
in the Spring
Washington Dec 17 Project Engin
eer c C Babb of Malta Mont has re
ported In the Washington office for win
ter assignment
H > reports excellent progress on construction
truction work of the Dodson unit of the
Ilk River project Work has been
rgetically prosecuted by contractors
11 the main canal and lateral systems
1l1 1 on the Dodson dam and certain con
111 structures as iicacigates culverts
nil bridges Water will probaBly be
r tjy for delivery to about 10000 acres
i land early next spring About 2500
lns of this area has not yet been filed
un It ii i now being divided into farm
iiit of approximately 160 acres giving
here possible SO acres of irrigated
land and SO acres for pasturage lands
The settler will only have to pay water
right i huge on land that is actually
irrigated
Other tracts in this unit have been
flied < l upon in the past for speculative
purposes but have been practically
abandoned and will be ppen to contest
by bona fide settlers whenever the gov
ernment opens the land for settlement
There are certain lands in private own
ership m which patent has already been
issued that can be purchased very
cheaply and that come under the gov
ernment canals Last spring and sum
mer some of these ranches exchanged
lands at about 15 per acre They are
now going up slowly in value and the
i selling price is from 20 to 25 per acre
without a water right The secretary
1 of the interior has not yet fixed the
water right charge but it will be done
I when public settlement announcement
is issued
I The past year has been a very suc
I cessful one from the ranchers point of
view in the Milk River valley During
the spring crop season about nine inches
of rain fell sufficient to mature the hay
and grain crops This was an unusual
rainfall for the average for the entire
year is only 14 inches The yields in I
oat averaged 40 bushels to the acre
and from 40 to 45 pounds to the bushel
It is selling for not less than 125 per
hundredweight Hay is bringing 10
per ton here and 12 baled
Without doubt there will be a largo
influx of settlers Into the valley in the
spring The transcontinental railroads
up to the present time have rather
passed Montana up concentrating their
efforts on the Pacific coast states This
year however they have inaugurated
an active advertising campaign and ex
pect to continue it for the next several
seasons There is now a special car ad
vertising the products of the Milk River
valley proceeding from point to point
through the middle western states

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