OCR Interpretation


The Salt Lake herald-Republican. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1909-1918, April 02, 1910, Section One, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058140/1910-04-02/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

4 THE HERALDREPUBUCAN SALT LAKE CITY UTAH SATURDAY APRIL 1910 SECTION ONE
THE SALT LAKE
1 t HERALDREPUBLICAN
Tho iDtcrMoantala llepabl ca
Est Feb 12 1906 >
i The Salt lake nrrnl i
Est June 0 1870
Only Republican Daily Newspaper in
East Lake City Utah
Term of SulmcrtptloBi
DAILY AND SUNDAYOne month
75 cents one year 800
SUNDAY On p year i2 dvance
SEMIWEEKLY In advance On
year 150 six months 76 cent I
subscribers wishing address or paper
changed must give former as well ai
present address
All papers are continued until ex
plicit order Is received to ds tn ntesevery
In every
All arrearages must ba paid
case
=
a
T11AOE5 rCrl COU 1dE
ANOTHER GOOD BOOK
Maybe it s a little late to say a good
word for A Certain Rich Man And
yet the book store Keepers say that there
who
people in Utah
are a great many
have not read it And these few lines
arc written for the benefit of those who
have not read
A Certain Rich Man is a marvelously
well
ly interesting story a wonderfully
conceived plot and a masterfully de
veloped recital Furthermore it is a
moral and a lesson But since the les
son is directed at rjch men the rest
of us can drink our fill of the delights
the story offers and leave the moral to
those whom it may concern
L
Maybe it is especially interesting to
the man or the woman in the neighbor
hood of fiftyand from there to the
sunset line of life But there is enough
of human nature and of love and of
music and of humor to delight all the
rest of the world It Is a product of
I the pen of William Allen White of pm
I poria Kansas and in all his active and
R useful career he has done nothing half
eo good
The hero of the story was a boy when
the war broke out and he followed to
battle the company that was raised in
his county He was far too young to be
a sol ler and if the army then had
been organized with the precision
known In later years he never would
have reached the front But in the for
mative period of military life in the
republic he and two of his boy com
panions managed to stay with their
i neighbors and friends even through the
horror and the perils of battle One of
i the boys was killed at Wilsons Creek
t where General Nathaniel Lyon lost his
life Onethe herowas shot in the
A foot and limped to the end of his
career
i He limped back home and became a
scholar and then a trader and then a
rich manthe Certain Rich Man of
i the tale He represents the intellectual
typeturned to moneymaking And
he becomes a captain of Industry a
I millionaire And his heart grows hard
er and harder with the passing years till
I not a semblance of human pity not a
vestige of simple honor remains He
stops this side of actions the penalty
for which would be Imprisonmentand
believes himself justified so long as he
achieves that result Yet he Is the hus
band of one wife the loving father of
i cne girl and the affectionate son of a
good mother It is a marvelous piece
of character delineation and no word
of comment can at all suggest the
I charm with which the simple material
has been handled
t How John Barclay crushed every hu
mane Instinct in his race for wealth
how he amassed a tremendous fortune
how he drove other men to crime how
he was converted through pain and sor
row to a better view of life how he
atoned in his death for the errors nf his
life these are matters that can be
known only by a reading of the story
The Heraldrepublican has always
k spoken of the things believed to be help
s ful to the people Here is a book they
should read They will weep with the
sorrows of those that mourn They will
laugh with the vagaries of those who are
gay They will see the rise of a mighty
state and the painting of American
character on broad canvas as they are
not likely to do in any other book now
before them
It is impossible to speak too warmly
in commendation of A Certain Rich
Man
OH GIVE IT UP
Once more the waves have played
havoc with the railroad on the Lucin
cutoff And that will be so to the end
of the chapter
Only by filling in all the lake to the
north of the line can the roadway be
secured from damage by the waters
whenever storms arise And storms are
going to arise as long as trains run at
least
The reasonable thing would be for the
Union Pacific people to adopt the more
direct route from east to west by leav
ing the present main line at Echo or
Henefer and come direct to Salt Lake
thence past the southern end of the
lake and on to the west It was the
engineering mistake of the century to
carry that road around the north end
It was a colossal blunder to leave Salt
Lake off the line of that road And the
error can bo erased only by abandoning
the line that experimentation unwisely
selected and locating it where shortest
distance easiest grades and most busi
ness are to be found
The Lucia cutoff is a spectacular
thing an excellent feature for adver
tising purposes But as a practical bit
of railroading it is a mistake
OBLIGATION
In the administration of President
James Monroe some theorists in this
country effected the establishment of a
colony of blacks on the west coast of
Africa And the amazing thing 111 + that
the government so established has ex
isted to the present day
It has existed though under difficul
ties of various kinds and under condi
tions that make The Sultan of Sulu
prosaic and dull One of the visitors to
Monrovia has described the contempt
engendered In the breast of the vice
president when members of the cabinet
do not pay his wife for their laundry
work and the suspicion excited in the
minds of the attorney general when he
whitewashes the Interior of his chiefs
home and finds fewer pieces of furni
ture than ate to be seen in the rooms of
the average traders
It has been a sort of play republic
when compared with the governments
of other nations But it is very real
and serious to the blacks They are
sent there as a sort of halfway meas
010
ure of atonement for taking them from
the wilds of Africa and reducing them
to slavery in America It could have
been nothing less thai failure at best
Return to the free and careless condi
tion of barbarians was impossible and
the task of compressing fifty centuries
of development into half the lifetime of
a man was an even greater Impossi
bility
bllltAnd
And yet the people of America have a
duty to perform there Monrovia must
be taken care of by the people of tho
United States That little country must
not be permitted to fall into the hands
of any other nation
Besides which It will be a good thing
for the United States Africa is rapidly
coming to the front
JUSTICE TO TEACHERS
AND THE PUBLIC
There is in this city a very general
movement Just now toward readjust
ment of pay for teachers and in some
instances to increase it Just what will
be the result would be difficult to fore
tell But in Justice to the teachers their
compensation should be increased Sure
Iv if that statement can be made touch
ing any other class of employment in
all this broad land it can with double
emphasis be made as to the teachers
Their pay should be increased
Heaven knows the principals and su
pervisors in Salt Lakes public schools
are not paid any too well and It is
equally known of heaven that the grade
teachers are underpaid This need not
I be construed as a complaint of theirs
Teachers are proverbially and habitual
ly patient even when they have good
cause for complaint It is not to be read
as a reflection on the management of
the board It is simply a statement of
facts
Grade teachers are the drudges of the
educational system They must pre
pare themselves and that means an in
vestment which involves sacrifice of
money and of more than money They
must keep up to date in teaching
methods and in the thousand details of
teaching work which may tend to suc
cessful results In the leading of their
pupils They are docked whenever
illnesswhIch need not surprise them
comes as a result of overwork And
there are two and a half months in
every year when they must hold them
selves under orders and yet are not
paid a penny
The first impressions of a child are
the lasting impressions What he learns
from the grade teacher stays with him
through life and it is on that founda
tion that his life and his education are
based
The grade teacher ought to be paid
a much bigger salary And the employ
ment should be for the entire year
There should be no months of vacation
without pay The rest and recuperation
are necessary But the loss of salary
in that time can ill be borne
Whatever the reform in the pay of
teachers these two things should be
remembered They ought to have more
money and they should be paid for
every month in the year And when
that plan is adopted there will be an
even better army of teachers here than
are found today And in that bettered
service the public will have done for
itself the greatest Imaginable benefit
THAT PAPER HELPS UTAH
Whatever is helpful to the state
whatever points better way for the
people whatever creases their value
to themselves and helr service to pos
terity that Cs to be encouraged And
for the reason that we believe the Des
eret Farmer is helpful to the state of
Utah now and is building for a better
Utah in the years that are to come we
make this word of commendation
In the hands of Mr L A Merrill that
little paper has become an established
Institution of the state It is a regular
message directed to the man who make
a living on the soil the men who make
partnership with nature the men who
reclaim the desert the men who plant
fruit trees and dig wells the men who
study to Improve their stock And its
regular visits have become so effective
that thousands of people in the moun
tain country depend upon it They look
upon its statements as authoritative
as they are
For the present and for many years
to come land will be the biggest element
in the Utah problem How to get the
best results from the soil how to se
cure tho best grain and the best ani
mals and the best human beingsthese
are the fantors in the one predominant
problem And the man who helpn in
solving whatever problems that may
Involve is a benefactor to Utah a
friend of the race
It Is the belief of The HeraldRepub
lican that Mr Merrill with the Deseret
Farmer is helping mightily In that
service
THE RAILROAD BILL
Senator Root has spoken parts of
three days on the railroad bill which
President Taft desires shall be enacted
into law And in the course of his ad
dress one startling thing has been re
vealed A majority of the senators have
not read the bill
It has been before Congress for
months It has been discussed in twen
ty cities at big assemblies of commer
cial and financial men It has been at
tacked and defended In a multitude of
newspapers And yet the senators
themselves are not at all familiar with
its provisions
Is it at all likely that congressmen as
a clasS are any better informed Is It
likely the people know what thg bill
provides Yet that bill has been print
ed It is in the Congressional Record
The substance of it has beau faithfully
reported though in condensed term by
the Associated Press reporters and by
special correspondents for many news
I
papers
But do the people get benefit from the
government provisions for publicity
That is the question Every possible
means has been adopted to tell the peo
ple about that and every other measure
presented before House or Senate Not
a citizen of the land but may have a
copy of the bill if he will ask his sen
ator or his congressman for it The
Record tells every word of It and every
word that has been said in Congress
either for or against it And yet it is
doubtful if the people know
That is the more likely because the
people certainly arc mistaken as to the
present tariff law Probably a ma
jority of the people of the United States
have damned that law In the belief that
it revises the tariff upward And that is
not at all the truth With every facil
ity for getting perfectly reliable Infor
mation they decline to be informed
Publicity Is demanded But are the
people taking the benefit provided
o
WHY AN ASSUMED NAME
Why should Gifford Pinchot sail under
an assumed name
Admitting that he didnt care to have
the world know that he was going to
Europe Just at the time when Colonel
Roosevelt was coming to Europe what
reason could have induced him to so
hide himself as to assume a name that
does not belong to him Why masque
rade under an alias
The man is free No one can tell him
where to go NQ one can tell him of
places that he must not visit He has a
sister in Europe and he has a perfect
I
right to visit her He has money I
enough to pay his fare and all expenses
There is no good reason for believing
that he would have been stopped even
If he had traveled under his own name
And furthermore It is not at all like
ly that the people were watching Mr
Pinchot half so closely as he seems to
have believed they were He might
have taken passage in his own name
and made the voyage to Europe with
out disturbing trade or overturning
governments
To be frank about it the people of the
world do not care greatly whether Mr
Pinchot goes or stays But the world
will read with transIentvery tran
sient Interest the statement that he
was so doubtful about the wisdom of
his journey that he booked his passage
under a name not his own
a
FRIENDS WITH CANADA
Every good American citizen will re
joice that there Is to be no trade war
with Canada It Is to be regretted that
the attitude of our people has been un
friendly toward Canadians And our
northern neighbors not quick to take
offense have yet felt the constant press
ure of antipathy until they have ac
quired a settled coldness toward our
people
The President does them the tardy
Justice of assuring peace relations in in
ternational trade The tariff is made
less offensive at the border And the
effect of that action on the part of the
American government will go far to re
store friendship with the Canadians
SCRAPS
Chicory used to mix with coffee is the
oldest known adulterant of food In some
cheap restaurants the coffee Is often half
chicory
The trees which are used in the govern
ment work or reforestation are grown at
eight government nurseries in the west
ern forest reserves
Since 1 S3 the sea has washed away 419
acres of the British Isles but it has also
added 30572 The land gained however
is at present useless
In Switzerland education Is both free
and compulsory and such ample facili
ties are provided for all classes that
Illiteracy is almost unknown
The steamer duck ot South America
loses Its power of flight as It matures
The reason Is that its wingsdo not grow
as the rest of its body develops
There are killed annually in the coal
mines in the United States three times
as many men per thousand as in the coal
mines of most European countries
A French writer predicts that In the
course of one Hundred years very few
persons will live In the cities Cities will
be used only for business purposes
An Austrian fire department is trying
out a fire engine that though drawn by
horses Is operated by electricity taken
from any convenient source through a
cable carried by the engine
So many counterfeit nickels are dropped
In the fare boxes of a New York street
railway company that the lead realized
when they are melted down makes an ap
preciable Item In the revenue of the road
For the years 1S08 to 1308 Great Britain
has produced 326 bushels of wheat an
acre as against 139 In this country and
93 in Russia which make the poorest
showing of the large wheatgrowing coun
tries
NOT A CRYBABY
He was a sturdy little lad bordering on
three years of age and although he was
bawling at the top of his voice after
two older youngsters who were running
away from him he still was an attractive
sight as he stood with his feet planted
wide apart and tears running down his
faceWhats
Whats the matter Buddy asked a
passerby wouldnt they let you pLty
with them
He stopped yelling a moment and looked
at his questioner
I dont care about that he said but
they called me a crybaby
Whereupon he resumed his yelling
Newark Call
I
Christ Crucified I
Bound upon th accursed tree
Faint and bleeding who is He
By the eyes so pale and dim
Streaming blood and writhing limb
By the flesh with scourges torn
By the crown of twisted thorn
By the side so deeply pierced
By the baffled burning thirst
By the drooping deathdewd brow
Son of Man tis Thou tie Thou
Bound upon th accursed tree
Dread and awful who is He
By the sun at noonday pale
Shivering rocks and rending vale
By earth that tsembles at His doom
By yonder saints who burst their tomb
By Eden promised ere he died
To the felon at His side
Lord our suppliant knees we bow
Son of Man tis Thou tis Thou
Bound upon th accursed tree
Sad and dying who Is He
By the last and bitter cry
The ghost given up in agony
By the lifeless body laid
In the chamber of the dead
By the mourners come to weep
Where the bones of Jesus sleep
Crucified we know Thee now
Son of Man tis Thou Us Thou
Bound upon th accursed tree
Dread and awful who is He
By the prayer for them that slew
Lord they know not what they do
By the spolld and empty grave
By the souls He died to save
By the conquest He hath won
By the saints before His throne
By the rainbow round His brow
Son of Man tis Thou tis Thou
Henry Hart Mllman
e
SampleTailored Suits K
Third to Half off d i s
Traveling Mans Samples the seasons I
newest styles not all sizes of every style J 4J
because there are no two alike but all 4
sizes from 34 to 47 are included in the
ld
collection All the popular shades are = t
represented o
Ladies Tailored Suits at Remarkable j
i l
markable Reductions s u
Its seldom an opportunity presents it t
I self so early in the season Each reduction = t
j
I tion is genuine under the regular price j I
the reduced price is plainly mark d Re x f i I
I ductions range from
I 3313 to 50 off °
Muslin Night Gowns Fourth Off
Our entire line of Muslin Night Gowns will be placed on sale
today Notice the dainty new styles and the superior quality of
the materials Absolutely new goods ranging in price from I
100 up to 2000 Today they will sell this way
100 Gowns 750 225 Gowns 170 375 Gowns 285
125 Gowns 90o 250 Gowns 185 400 Gowns 300
150 Gowns 110 275 Gowns 205 500 Gowns 375
175 Gowns 130 300 Gowns 225 600 Gowns 450
200 Gowns 150 350 Gowns 260 And so on up to 2000
An Elegant Line
e Sale of Silk Ef ¬
of Long fect Dress Goods
Coats
Entire line of beautiful Silk
Effect Dress Goodsmysotis
Suitable for auto riding for
or
jacquelin Arabian runchunda
1 general wearstrictly tailored
tub tussah and all our Rogers
effects and others belted in at
t Thompson aereo rough silk
i the waist with fancy belts and
crinkled silk and silk I
striped
buckles
I crepe regular 65c
All the new shades are 48
repre C
a yardtoday
sentedblack navy tan rose re
1 seda and gray are shown in
French and widewale serges
panama cloths shepherd checks r
coverts and fancy weaves There
are also a number of decided nov
4 elties in pongee silk Prices
range from 1250 to 3000
° I OUR DRUG STORE IS AT
112114 SOUTH MAIN ST
n
My Business Opportunity
t
Shoe Sale is Being Renewed 4 I
With Greater Bargains Than Ever
r
The new spring goods are here The newest and
most desirable styles of the yearthe most attractively
priced footwear in the town even at regular prices
But the new styles the attractive values and the many
varieties that will surely prove popular have lost their
attractiveness to methey must be sold regardless of
F the actual returns right now
The business opportunity offered me makes it neces I
sary for me to raise an immense amount of money
quickly and for that reason actual shoe value counts
for little with me right now
t I
So Here Are the Bargains
i Will You Get Your Share I
t
S i
Womens patent oxfords in the daintiest styles of the It 1
year Regularly priced at 400 3050
selling now at vpJoiJf
it Womens patent and kid oxfordsan exceptionally fine
t variety of styles and leathers Regularly d 2 85
at tp jVJu
priced at 350 now selling
Womens kid oxfordsattractive lasts that arc all new I
The regular 250 values selling P S 1570 QE
now at
Misses and childrens shoes on the bargain tables con
tain some of the greatest shoe values that youve ever t
seen Tallies range up to 300 but the shoes sell now
at 115 135 and 165
f Its a great outpouring of shoe values Although only
ladies shoes are priced in the ad the sale includes thou I
sands of pairs of mens boys and childrens shoes at
prices away below par
Y
I
Its an opportunity of unus
a ual importance Buy early II
4 I
CHRISTENSON j
120 SOUTH MAIN 1 1
i J
0
if
3 t
t
I
S
mothers
Do you know that very often
the distress experienced by you
or your daughters each month
is due directly to some disorder
or disease of the Uterine Or
gans I
gansYou know the symptoms I
nervousness headache dizzi
ness aching limbs etc We I
tell you the cure I
Graefenberg
Uterine Catholicon I
It quickly regulates and posi I
tively cures all female complaints
Get a bottle today
I At all Druggists
Int toj book pufod on spp cites
THE GRAEFENBERG CO I
III Cbamhen 51 New York
0
50 high rade
Traveling Bags at
111 price
This Week
Special Sale
on Trunks
Buy from the
maker
S Riain St
k
HIAWATHA 1
COAL I l l
II
II I I
x
MINED IN UTAH
SPLENDID FUEL FOR
ALL PURPOSES
JESSE H WHITE
General Sales Agent
532 JUDGE BUILDING
Salt Lake City
WE have some spe
cial things to tell
you about
Umbrellas
this week See our
show windows
fi U
2 hAL JEWELERS
59 E Third So St
TRIB I
A guaranteed cure for the Liquor and
Tobacco Habit
Price 1250
SchrammJohnson Drugs The Never
Subatltutors Five Stores Where
the Cars Stop
NEW STYLES
For men women
and children ot
I K T t a 11 y reduced
price
1
Pine S
Xnrtc
Ilex
nig
nu
conntn
In nil
Hue
I
t
120 fliain Street
WHEN YOU MOVE
DO IT Y
OUR FACILITIES ARE COMPLETE
IN DETAIL SERVICE IS PROMPT
AND SATISFACTORY A TRIAL
WILL CONVINCE YOU
JC Watson Transfer Co
W C WATSON MST
IND 1608 BELL 8468
YOUNG MEN
For Gonorrhoea and Gleet pet Pabats Okay Spedflc
It is the ONLY medicine which will cure each arc
every ewe NO CASE known it has ever faled t <
cure no matter how serious or of how longstanding
Results from its use will astonish ybu
It is absolutely safe prevents stricture P DC
and canbe taken without ineonventeneeeg eg I W
and detention from business PRICEY
For solo by SCHRAMMJOHNSO

xml | txt