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The Salt Lake herald-Republican. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1909-1918, May 22, 1910, Real Estate, Classified, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058140/1910-05-22/ed-1/seq-12/

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2 THE HERALDREPUBLICAN SALT LAKE CITY UTAH SUNDAY MAY 22 1910 SECTION TWO
SOLID TRAIN OF AUTOS SPEEDING TO THE PACIFIC COAST
I
J
T S1 lOUIS IS Tn I
i HAVE MOTOR TRACK
Million Club Takes Up Project
and Promises to Carry It
Through
FAVORS WOODEN SAUCER
EXPERT SAYS LOS ANGELES
STRUCTURE IS PROFITABLE
Special to The HeraldRepublican
St Louis May 218t Louis now
seems destined to have a motor track
without much further delay In the
past several years the carrying out of
such plans have been urged and sev
eral times it has seemed that they
would be realized promptly but never
c before has there been such a bright
outlook as at the present time with
te Mlllioa club back of the move
ment
A committee has been appointed by
diaries F Wenneker president of the
Million club and promptly it will pre
sent an estimate of the cost of a
track for motor racing and report upon
what has already been done else
where That the track to be suggested
by the committee will be of the new
saucer type seems probable in view of
the attltuto of John J Behen one of
Its prominent members who says
The experiment of building two or
three mile tracks for motor racing has
not been successful in any case that
I know of The tremendously expen
sive two and onehalf mile track at
Brooklanda Waybrldge England has
proved a white elephant on the hands
of the public spirited men who built it
T think it has never proved a paying
proposition as a motordrome and even
now Is used more for aviation than for
motoring
In Indianapolis I believe that no
great success has attended the motor
events on the speedway which was
n
I completed there last year at a cost of
about 500000 I am inclined to be
lieve that this type of motordrome will
never pay anywhere and when you
take into consideration the conditions
it is not difficult to see why
In the first place the cost la too
great for the results desired But
what is more important the course is
so long that details of traok racing
such as make It interesting to the pub
lic are lost to the spectators except
when the cars aro on the home stretch
of the course
It seems to me that the only kind
of a track to build nowadays for mo
tor racing is the wooden saucer type
The one recently Inaugurated at Los
Angeles has already proved a success
andxl understand will soon pay for
Itselflong before this season is over
The attraction of the sport provided
by such a track Is tremendous On
the big planked dish the cars may
pass and repass one another in safety
jockey for position and all the time
keep up a tremendous pace while the
spectators on account of their prox
imity and the inclined surface of the
track are able to watch every detail
1 believe the cost of erecting a
wooden saucer track is about onefifth
the cost of a satisfactory two or three
mile course Besides the saucer is not
an experiment
y
BOY HUNTS FOR HIS
SISTER BUT GETS LOST
After wandering the streets of Salt
Lake all night In search of his 6year
old sister Roland Cook aged 9 son of
Mr and Mrs Charles Cook of Jlarys
vale was taken to police headquarters
yesterday forenoon by Patrolman Tom
Glllesple His parents hunted all night
for him before they went to police
headquarters late yesterday afternoon
and found him They came to Salt
Lake Friday to visit relatives The
sister for whom the lad was hunting
returned shortly after he started out
to find her
The entrance of the American car
into the 1910 racing season at the At
lantic racing season at the Atlanta
Motordrome races was marked by a
brilliant performance Summarized
the American came away victor in the
fiftymile freeforall second in the
ten and twelvemile freeforall races
and on the last day of the meet In the
200mile race gave an exhibition of Its
ability to keep its feet
i Locomobile
I
1
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Baby Tonneau Four Passenger Car
The price of the Locomobile is one to excellence of
construction of each part
Result Economy Smoothness of operation long life
and above everything Safety
Two styles now on exhibition
Barnett Kaar Thp T lnfI > Garage
10911 West South Temple St Utah Agents
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4 + k7 a
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Price 6500
HBHBMMKMM nKHmMMMQ n
The Home You Want
Location 10th East 3rd South
If Well start in the basement The basement con
sists of furnace room coal room fruit room
laundry and drying room
Cf Next is the main floor consisting of six large
well lighted airy rooms double paneled birch
doors hardwood floors beam ceilings in cHnnRJ
and living rooms Main floor is fir trimmed
Cf This home was built by us The very best ma
terial we could get was used in the construction
We employed none but skilled workmen
V q We feel that in this home we have the ideal In
every respect and the person getting it can
consider himself fortunate
Cf We truthfully believe this to be the best real
estate buy in this city
IJf We solicit architects or others knowing mate
rial and workmanship to inspect
GEO B STANDING
Real Estate Broker
73 South Main Bell Main 4391
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1011 PACKARD THIRTY TOURING CAR
STANDARD EQUIPMENT INCLUDES TOP
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V V V V 1911 PACKARDS
< SET NEW STYLES
t y Complete line of cars with foredoor bodies One
z quality two sizes the Packard Thirty and the
F Packard Eighteen Town Car I
= V TOURING OAR CLOSECOUPLED
> f RUNABOUT COUPE PHAETON
LIMOUSINE LANDAULET
Early deliveries Limited allotment We are now
taking order Complete information and cata i
r > logue on request Demonstration b y appointment i
V r 7 t < > UTAH MOTOR CAR COMPANY I
L J Gilmer Gen Mgr
II I
V I
7 3 1 225 So West Temple Both Phones 483 1 a
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i
I EXPANDING CITIES
NEED MOTOR CARS
Widely Separated Communi
ties Require Expeditious
Means of Transportation
i
BY THOMAS J HOT
The automobile is filling a new de
mand and is a vehicle of practical util
ity and while the demand at the pres
ent time is taxing the capacity of the
factories of the country it is only the
beginning of business that Is bound
to be substantial and continued until
some one invents a means of trans
portation superior to the automobile
The large cities and even those of
medium and small size are spreading
out so fast that means of getting from
one point to another are absolutely
necessary The horse Is too slow and
the street car Is not convenient City
salesmen collectors physicians and a
hundred and one different occupations
require a man to cover an entire town
or a portion of the town and are
finding that the automobile is the only
practical method of increasing their
own ability to cover their territory
rapTuly
In the large centers men of wealth
are moving to the suburbs and find
their best method or transportation to
be by the automobile At the present
time the business of most automobile
factories consists almost exclusively of
pleasure vehicles and under this head
are thousands and tens of thousands
of automobiles that are used a tew
hours of the day for pleasure and the
balance of the time for real business
purposes The demand for pleasure ve
hicles Is taxing the capacity of the va
rious factories Within the next few
years the automobile industry will un
dergo changes and where a factory
now confines itself to the production
of pleasure vehicles they will add a
line of commercial vehicles and when
this business really commences to as
sume its proper proportions It will
take three times as many automobiles
for commercial purposes as now manu
factured for the pleasure trade
Forget the term craze and remem
ber that we are connected with a gi
gantic business which has a wonder
ful future and which offers untold pos
sibilities to thousands who enter it and
will take it as seriously as they would
take any other line of business Many
changes will be brought by the auto
mobile the most Important of which
is to be the Improved system of roads
throughout the entire country better
living arrangements for those com
pelled to reside in large cities as they
can live further from tHe busy center
of the town and enjoy more of the
benefits and advantages of subu n
life Untold millions of acres of
ground will be increased in value by
being made accessible due to the use
of the automobile and to improved
roads
LIST OF DONTS fOR
AMATEUR MOTORISTS
+ Amateur motorists are finding +
+ much valuable Information in a +
+ list of 10 Donts which the Hud +
+ son Motor Car company has pre +
+ pared It Is contained in the Ad +
4 vance instruction book which the
+ Hudson company Is publishing for >
+ the benefit of users of Its cars
+ Dont race the engine If you f
4 release the clutch the engine will +
+ run away Close the throttle You +
+ cannot abuse the motor worse than +
+ by allowing it to race at high f
4 speed without load
Dont advance the spark lever
i
when cranking +
4 Dont shift the gears without +
+ first releasing the clutch +
+ Dont apply the brake hard ex +
+ cept in an emergency 4
+ Dont start before seeing to the +
4 gasoline oil and water 4
+ Dont tear the motor to piece
+ Locate the trouble first I
Dont allow the machinery to be
covered with dirt Wipe it off +
Dont let in the clutch suddenly 4
+ Dont hurry wnen operating the
+ car and gear shifter level
Dont allow motor to knock by 4
t reason ot having the spark lever +
4 advanced too far ahead on heavy +
+ grades or when pulling a heavy +
+ load The driver will however +
4 find It best to keep his spark ad +
+ vanced where the pull is slight as +
+ the motor works cooler and uses 4
+ less gasoline +
O
e > N viY zati n SkAa2 r K Y
4e HAfYu
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1911 Packard Thirty Touring Car
I
Speed Is Mania of the Age
Reason Why Auto Is Popular
jrHERE is a fascination about speed
THERE appeals to most all of us I
believe The American generally
speaks with pride about the fast
twentieth century pace and nearly ev
ery one who is active these days likes
to feel that he Is traveling as fast as his
neighbors We like to speak of our
eighteenhour trains and it is only
natural that most every one Is fasci
nated by speeding in an automobile
You would think possibly that the
racing pilots after several years of ser
vice at the wheel of high speed cars
would begin to regard their flights at
terrific speed as a matter of course a
I part of the days work as commonplace
I as any other work to which they would <
be devoted I am convinced however
that the peculiarly exhilarating sensa
tion of traveling at a headlong speed
never loses Its charm
When once Inoculated with the speed
mania you are almost incurable It
has been my experience in the few
years that I have been driving that no
matter how fast a pilot may drive he
no sooner finishes the race than he be
gins to imagine that he could improve
the time if he had another chance Have
I
you ever noticed drivers of big cars who
I
would finish a spectacular run against
time and would come rushing back to
the judges stand with a plea for an
other trial explaining that they were
sure they could cut off a second or two
There must be a glamor about motor
car racing otherwise so many hundreds
of thousands of people would not travel
many miles and part with real money
in order to witness the battle between
cylinders and men And if these people
In the grand stand become so excited
with the mere sight of the contests and
the odor of burning gasoline and oil
think of the thrill that surges through
the men who are holding onto the steer
ing wheel and trying to shove the prow
of their speed demons to the front on
some wicked turn with the big motor
thundering regularly like the syste
matic firing from a squad of machine
guns
gunThe wind roars in your ears the car
thunders onward fairly alive as if 1
pulsing with a life all Its own the oil
tattoos your face and the odor of the
burning gas fairly intoxicates you the
dust and grime and dirt cake on your
face but there Is an intense feeling of
conquest battle which makes the red
blood course madly through your veins
KANSAS AUf 0 FLIES
SVJIMS AND CLIMBS
Sunflower Stats Resident Is Proud
Possessor of Machine That
Has Wonderful Abilities
An automobile which flew like a
bird swam like a fish and climbed like
an antelope is the proud possession
of a Kansas City man In this man
ner Charles E Logan characterizes his
sixcylinder Oldsmobile limited tour
Ing car in which he recently made a
trip from Kansas City to his ranch In
San Luis valley Colorado
Mr Logan drove his car through
without a mishap and says he had the
experience of his life Through east
ern Kansas the mud was as bad as
could be and he was often told by
farmersthat he simply could not get
through that they were not willing
to make the attempt to get to town to
buy provisions with a light wagon and
a fourhorse team These statements
did not discourage Mr Logan in the
slightest his reply being that he and
the limited could go where the fou
horses could not and he proceeded to
show his faith by his works even If it
did require two days to cover the sev
entyfive miles from Kansas City to
Topeka
in western Kansas the sand encoun
tered was worse than the eastern Kan
sas mud But again the big six went
through oA
The question of roads seems to have
been the least of Mr Logans troubles
for in Colorado or In parts of it where
he found no roads he made his own
Bridges were also a minor considera
tion for where he found none he built
them or if the streams were too wide
for that he plunged in and forded
In crossing the divide via La Vets
pass which is 11200 feet above the sea
level the big six plunged into a
twentyfoot snow bank but came out
without a scar of any kind
Mr Logan was as daring as he was
enthusiastic and there was absolutely
no stopping his onward march There
were places in the mountains where
there were no roads where he crossed
on the ice and where as much as eight
een inches of skidding would have car
ried him a certain drop of 2000 or 3000
feet But the big Oldsmobile didnt
skid or he could not have told the story
himself

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