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The Goldfield news and weekly tribune. [volume] (Goldfield, Nev.) 1911-1947, January 17, 1914, Image 2

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UP AGAINST IT.
f-V\N
, ^
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/
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T.e r"“
TO FRONT AGAIN
AFTER LAPSE OF FIFTEEN
YEARS HIGH-GRADE
IS FOUND
Goldyke has come to the front
after a lapse of fifteen years with a
showing of high-grade that may lead
to more important developments in
that camp. Samples of high-grade
have been exmoiiea in Tonopah and
the assays give values in gold and
silver running all the way from
$3000 to $5000 a ton. Of course
there is not much of this particular
streak, but there is enough shipping
and milling ore behind it to encour
age investors to go ahead with devel
opment on a scale that will demon
strate the value of the holdings.
M. L. Butler of Los Angeles is
credited with the find. He is not a
miner, but he has been long enough
in the field to know good rock when
he sees it, and lie has spent consider
able money during the past ten years
in proving up what he thinks is go
ing to be one of the finest properties
in Mineral county. He came into To
nopah a year after the discoveries
along Mizpah hill and branched out
to the north until he located a group
of six claims at the old camp of
Goldyke, thirty miles northeast from
Liming, which is the nearest ship
ping point. He prosecuted work with
diligence, but for the past three years
he has not done' anything more than
his assessment work.
The high-grade samples are mgniy
oxidized and run from $150 to $5000
a ton from a five-incn streak in a
ledge eight feet wide that averages
over $30. A bond and lease has been
given the Nevada Chief Mining com
pany, consisting of O. O. Emmons,
Bob Williams and Charles Steele, and
they propose to go ahead on a com
prehensive plan of development. The
ledge was opened through a shaft on
the north side of a rhyolite contact,
where a depth of 230 feet has been
attained. At 150 feet the old com
pany, known as the Paradise Nevada
Mining company, began cross-cutting
and encountered three feet of ore.
Then they came back to the shaft
and resumed sinking to 230 feet,
where another cross-cut was run and
an upraise started, with the result
that in a height of thirty feet they
cut the ledge and found the high
values.
Mr. Butler returned to Los Angeles
this morning and will wait for the
leasers to show what can be done
with the property. Six men are em
nloyed and it is proposed to increase
that number as fast as the showing
warrants.—Bonanza.
__▲_.
MANGANESE ORE IN RUSSIA
Some of the richest deposits of
manganese ore are located in tlie
Russian Caucasus. The principal
mines are situated at Tchlatouri, in
the government of Kotais, about 190
verts (12G miles) from the Black
sea ports of Batum and Poti. The
exploitation of the Tchiatouri mines
began in 1878, but remained on a
very limited scale until 1885, when
the Trans-Caucasian railway was
constructed. The ore is shipped to
England, Germany, the United
States, France and Belgium, and in
smaller guantites to other countries.
England, Germany and the United
States are the best customers.
PAYS COUNTY HIS SHARE
OF COMPROMISE FIGURE
CLEIJK HAMILTON ENRICHES
COI*NTV COFFERS BY ONE
THOUSAND DOLLARS
County Clerk Hamilton yesterday
paid to District Attorney M, A. Dis
kin the sum oi $iuuu, nis share of
$(>5011, the figure named in the agree
ment for the compromise of the suit
i f Esmeralda county against Hamil
ton and his sureties, George Wing
field, Sheriff W. A. Ingalls, Mrs. L.
L. Patrick and John S. Cook, to re
cover $20,000 of county funds lost
through the failure of the Nye anil
Ormsby county bank.
Mr. Wingfield and Sheriff Ingalls
paid, respectively, $5000 and $500
last Tuesday at the time the com
promise was effected with the mem
bers of the board of county commis
sioners. The full sum of $0500 will
be turned over to the state, since
that was the amount of its share of
the lost money.
FIRST NATIONAL ELECTS
OFFICERS ANI) DIRECTORS
The regular semi-annual meeting
of stockholders and directors of the
First National bank was held yester
day at its banking house, all the di
rectors being pri sent except B. E.
Nixon, who is in the east.
All the members of the old board
of directors were re-elected as fol
lows: George Wingfield, F. M. Lee,
.1. G. Taylor, J. Shi han, William
Stock and George E. Stall.
The old officers of the bank were
also re-elected, as follows: George
Wingfield, president; F. M. Lee, Vice
president; J. Sheehan, cashier; C. L.
Tobin, assistant cashier; A. D. Dern,
assistant cashier.
Tin? usual semi-annual dividend j
was declared, the reports presented!
showing a gratifying amount of busi
ness for the year and the fine con-I
(titirn which has made the bank rec
ognized us one of the strongest and
o1 ndesi financial institutions of the
s'ate.
A resolution was passed that the
bank 1) come a member of the federal
reserve association provided for inj
the new currency law. The First Na
tional is the first bank in this state
10 take this action. -Humboldt Star.
HEAVY ZINC (UT1LT
The statement comes from Good
springs, in Clark county, that the
Potosi property, formerly owned by
Mahony Pros., of San Francisco, has
been taken over by the Empire Zinc
company, at a consideration said to
b $125,000. The property has been
producing, throughout the vear,
about 750 tons monthly of zinc ore,
averaging 3 8 per cent zinc and 8 per
cent lead, i ml it is expected that the
new company will increase this pro
duction materially. Plans are under
way to build a tramway from the
mine to Summit, a distance of two
milt s. and a motor-truck road thence
to the railroad at Arden. Motor
trucks will be used for ore haulage.
-♦
.Miner is Iturned
Stuart Macdonald, an employe of
j the McNamara Mining company in
Tonopah, suffi red the loss of his eye*
| brows and sustained a painful burn
to one of his hands several days ago
by an explosion of gas from crude
oil being drawn from a tank at the
property, caused by him striking a
match to light a cigar.
BUCKSKIN NATIONAL
HAS ANNUAL MEETING
The annual meeting of the stock
holders of the Buckskin National
Gold Mining company was held at the
company office at Winnemucca yes
terday. Representatives of 970,666
shares of the capital stock of the
company were present.
The election of a board of direc
tors for the ensuing year was the
principal business before the meet
ing and the old board, consisting of
VV. J. Bell, E. A. Stauffer, F. F. Bell,
R. E. L.Windle and C. D. Mackay
was re-elected.
At a meeting or the directors im
mediately following the adjournment
of tlie stockholders meeting. The
following officers were elected for the
term: \V\ J. Bell, president: E. A.
Stauffer, vice-president. C. D.
Mackay was appointed secretary and
treasurer, and F. F. Bell, superinten
tendent.
A block of 46,500 shares of tlie
treasury stock of the company was
placed upon the market to be sold
at 50 cents per share, in order to
realize capital for the extensive work
contemplated by the company as soon
as spring opens.—Humboldt Star.
__a._
CARBONATE ELY COMPANY
IS DEVELOPING CLAIMS
M. M. Johnson, manager of the
Carbonate Ely company, with prop
erty located at Sawmill canyon, near
White River valley, came to Ely dur
ing the week to lay in supplies for
his camp. Mr. Johnson has been
in charge of the property since last
fall, and has been doing a consider
able amount of permanent develop
ment work. He lias a shaft down
50 feet, and is now arranging for
a hoist, and as soon as it is erect
ed the shaft will be carried on
down. Mr. Johnson states that so
far nothing but ore has been taken
o it while sinking the shaft, which
leads him to believe that the com
pany will soon develop a large cop
per property. The company was
organized about seven years ago, and
is controlled by Salt Lake and Ely
people. Ely Record.
COAL MIXING IN OHIO
Although Ohio suffered from a
number of uptoward influences dur
ing 1913, the production of coal in
that state was slightly in excess of
the output in the preceding year,
hut it amounted to a little over 34,
500,000 short tons. In the late
spring the mining operations were
adversely affected by the unprece
dented flood which tied up transpor
tation and put the coal mines out cf
business for about one month. Later
in the year, as if to make up for the
excess of water during the spring,
the Ohio Valley region was serious
ly crippled by drought, and the wa
ter supply in Ohio was deficient dur
ing September, October and Novem
ber.
Trial in Progress
Trial lias begun in the federal court
at Carson City of the suit of Mrs.
George Sells against the Truckee
River General Kleetric company to
recover $50,000 damages for the
death of tier husband. Sells’ death
ocurred at the power plant in Verdi
in 1912 when a long ladder he was
| carrying came into contact with a
| high-power line, causing a short-cir
cuit and killing him.
RESOLUTIONS.
^ATT£Rf'^ 1
BIG LYNX BAGGED
BY HHNIING PABIY

C. H. OLDS LAYS ANIMAL LOW
WITH TWO RIFLE
SHOTS
Returning to town yesterday af
ternoon from a few hours’ hunt in
the v'cinity of Alkali Springs, C. H.
Olds, Charles Shiitz, Joseph Swift,
James Murphy and J. S. McGinniss
exhibited as evidence of their ability
as marksmen one lynx and sixteen
jaekrabbits. The lynx was shot by
Olds with a 38-calibre rifle.
The first shot wounded the animal,
which weighs about 50 pounds, and
it was necessary for the party to j
chase it about a mile with their team j
of horses before Olds got another |
shot at it and laid it low. In the j
chase after the lynx, Murphy fell!
from the wagon and, in addition to
sustaining painful cuts on the side j
of his face, broke his doublebarre)
shotgun in two.
PROGRESS IN META I IAJRGY
Substantial improvement bas been
made in 1!) 1 ."> in methods of recover
ing gold and silver, but few striking
innovations were brought forward.
As has been the case in recent years,
the cyanide process was the most im
portant in point of quantity and
value of metals recovered. Its use
was extended to tlie treatment of a
greater variety of ores.
The use of aluminum as a pre
cipitant of gold and silver from cyan
ide solution received increased at
tention in 1013.
Dissatisfaction with zinc precipita
tion at the Nipissing mill led to the
investigation of the merits of alumi-'
num does not combine with alkali
finally adopted.
There are a number of advantages
in using aluminum for precipitation.
Although it is more expensive than
zinc, yet much less of it is used per
ounce of metal precipitated. Alumi
num does not cobine with alkali
cyanide as does zinc, hence does not
cause consumption of cyanide. When
the precious metals are precipitated,
all of the cyanide combined with
them is regenerated. This necessi
tates the presence of free caustic
alkali in the solution . One of the
obstacles to the successmul use of
aluminum dust has been the difficul
ty of wetting it and getting a thor
ough contact with the solution. This
is overcome by the use of some form
of vortex mixer.—Metallurgical and
Chemical Engineering.
NEW STRIKE AT NATIONAL
Late reports from the camp of
National, in northern Humboldt
county and not far from the Oregon
line, announce a "rich strike” on the
Hlnes-Baldwin lease on the White
Rock property. A drift at a depth
of 400 feet is said to hav > exposed
high-grade ore, the pay-shoot vary
ing from a few inches to 3 l > feet.
The ore is said to resemble that
taken from the famous National
mine.
Slight Fire Occurs
Eire of an unknown origin slightly
damaged the gymnasium of the vol
unteer tire department of Tonopah
recently. The flames had eaten away
the cloth ceiling of the main audi
torium and were attacking the roof
when discovered and quickly extin
guished by the members of the paid
fire department.
ACTIVITY RENEWED
HI DEEP CHEEK MIKE
WOODMAN MINING COMPANY IS
PUTTING FORCE OF MEN
TO W ORK
The Woodman Mining company,
whose property is located in the Clif
ton mining district in the Deep
Creek country, is putting a force of
men to work to get out and ship n !
lot of high-grade gold ore and to |
develop and block out apparently j
large bodies of low-grade, with a!
view to providing a mill Tor their re
duction, according to a Salt Lake
man who has interests in that re
gion.
The first work is to be done in the
Tlverda section of the company’s
holdings, adjoining the old Gold
Hill property. Years ago leasers
using a Crawford mill took from the
Alverda and another claim in that
vicinity from $150,000 to $200,000.
Years ago the mine belonged to
the wealthy eastern man from whom
its name is derived. When he was
just on the point of putting in a mill
and pushing the mine’s production
he died. Litigation among the heirs
followed and lasted for years. After
this was ended there were two fac
tions among the owners, and it is
only recently that these troubles
have been healed and the plans for
working the mine agreed upon.—
Salt I.ake Tribune.
SUIT INSTITUTED
Through liia attorney, E. Carter
Edwards, James H. Parks, adminis
trator of the estate of J. M. Perry,
deceased, has instituted suit in the
district court again Theodore Tobish,
former administrator of the same es
tate, and his sureties, Frank 8. Hunt
and F. L. Adamson, to recover the
sum of $1,712.50 alleged to have
been collected in insurance upon the
life of Perry.
SUCCESSFUL* OPERATION
William Ball, who several months
ago suffered an Injury to his spine
while at work in a local mine, was
yesterday operated upon at the Lane
hospital in San Francisco. According
to a telegram received today by his
mother, who resides in Goldfield, the
operation was successful but he will
have to wear a plaster-cast for at
Last one year.
MRS. ~ROSE SHANNON <of Tono
pah passed through Goldfield today
on her way home after a visit to
Los Angeles.
COMPANY SEEKS
POTASH DEPOSIT
DEED WELLS DRILLED IN RAIL
ROAD VALLEY IN QUEST
FOR MINERAL
The Railroad Valley company has
issued a report, accompanying a call
for a meeting of the stockholders.
The report contains a complete de
scription of the company’s property ^
and of its operations during the year, "
the geological report being written
by E. E. Ere?, the company’s con
sulting geologist, who has made an
exhaustive study of the possibilities
of finding potash in the dry lake beds
of the Great Basin.
Operations of the company have
been conducted on an extensive scale,
involving the drilling of over 10,000
feet of wells. This work has not
resulted in developing potash in com
mercial quantities but has shown the
presence, in large volume of gaylus
site, which carries over 35 per cent
of soda, and it is the belief of the
management and engineers that this
deposit can be mined and the product
refined profitably. Drilling opera
tions have been suspended for the
winter months but plans are under
consideration for the resumption of
work at depth in the spring.
ROCHESTER ROA1) EXTENDED
The terminus of the Silver Belt
railroad, built by A. A. Codd and ex
tending from Oreana, on the South
ern Pacific main line, to the camp
of Rochester, is to be swung to the
foot of Rochester canyon, where ore
bins will he erected. The road will
then be extended up the canyon to
the foot of Lincoln Hill, a change
that will necessitate the addition of
a Shay engine to the rolling stock of
t..e road.
--
NEW MINING COMPANIES
Articles of incorporation of two
mining companies were filed yester
day with County Clerk Davey.
The National Buckskin Mines
company, with principal office in Win
nemucca, is incorporated for one mil
lion $1 shares. The incorporators
are James Martin, S. F. Flynn and
Frank L. Reber.
The Lockslee Gold Placer Mining
company, principal office in Roches
ter, is incorporated for one million
$1 shares, the incorporators being
Ern.'st J. Locke. James B. Jones and
Will F. Heffernan.—Humboldt Star.
E .C. SMITH E. J. AM ANN
SMITH & AMANN
Stocks and Bonds
MINING STOCKS - OIL STOCKS - BONDS
Russ Building - - San Francisco
_

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