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The Ogden standard-examiner. [volume] (Ogden, Utah) 1920-current, April 05, 1920, LAST EDITION - 4 P.M., Image 1

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Y A nfuIuTYcrNo. 82 Price Rve Ccnu ' " O GDEfTITY7UTAH, MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 57 1920 LASTEDTTiQN 4 P M
I RIOTS FEARED IN STRIKE OF SWITCHMEN I
!f. MICH PRIMARY
I CLOSELY WATCHED
J . IN POLITICAL CIRCLE
K Lowden, Wood and Johnson
B- Deeply Interested in Vote of
Influential State
I ! DETROIT ACTING ON
m j BIG BOND ISSUE
R Eugene V. Debs Socialist Can-
1 didate Palmer Only Demo-
I i crat to Stump State
g I DETROIT. .MUh.. April n. Kar!y
Pit voting In the Michigan pi'inia r today
f'l "was ovldonllv affected by the Easier
km storm, the turnout of voters Kcncral-
I I ly bolng lighter than expected.
; ft j While Indications of clearing
' I woalher In some Industrial centers
, Knvo promise of brlkor votlnp this
f aftornoon, other polnta reported snow
! flurries still prevailing with lndlca-
1 lions that voting would bo ninterlal-
' ly curtailed Some country highways
1 wore piled with snow and a very light
J vote wau anticipated In those xectlons.
1 I Tho Inclement weather also oper-
I I nlcd to curtail the woman vote.
1 I j llllO 130IUl I5SUC
I h In Detroit where a 515.000.000
111 bonding proposition for a munlcipal-
II ly ownod traction system ovcrshad-
1 owed-tho presidential primary voting
I f started very light' but with warming
I woathor a better turnout was ex-
pected during the afternoon.
pressed by tho headquarters of Gov
ernor Frank O. L.owden, Major Gen
eral Leonard Wood, and Senator
Ulram Johnson, all of whom made
oxlonslve tours. All other candidates
wero Gonoral Pershing, Senator Miles
Polndoxtcr and William G. Simpson
of Detroit. Ilorbort Hoovor's name
appcarod on both tho Republican and
Democratic tickets.
only Democrat to 6ainpalgn through
out ,the state, the others nanVed on
that ticket being William G. McAdoo.
"William J. Bryaji and Governor Ed
wards of NcwJorscy.
Eugono V. Dobs was the Socialist
candidate.
The. polls opened at 7 a. m. and
were close in tho rural precincts at
5 and' In tho city at S p. m.
A.VNH MAIlTrX TO It UN
WASHINGTON, April 5. Anno
Martin, defeated two years ago for
tho United States senate In Nevada,
announced from her headquarters
hero today that she would make tho
race again this year for tho repub
lican nomination. Miss Martin said
she would accept tho' nomination If
j offered on her platform which In-
m , V cludod opposition to tho poaco treaty
' and the league of nations.
I- MI33 Martin declared that under no
I j circumstances would she make a lone
r fight In tho primary against a hi
ll I partisan fusion candidate and If so
! opposed would run as an "lndcpcnd-
1 ! cnt"
HEADQUARTERS ESTABLISHED
E CHICAGO, April Wostorn wom-
E en's headquarters for the A. Mitchell
t Palmer presidential campaign were
H established In Chicago today by Mrs.
W 5 Jlalsoy W. Wilson, national chairman
ffi. jj for women, and Mlns Lucy Collins
ill of IinncnPlls- iIrs- T- T- Cottman
jjj' of St. Louis will bo In charge.
II ROCKEFELLER BUSY IN
I INTER CHURCH MOVE
Hi NEW YORK, April 5. John D.
H1 Rockefeller, Jr., at the head of a party
j of more than, twenty public officials,
VI representative businoss men and re-
,' lm liglous leaders, left here today for a
wl two Avoeks' tour of a number of cities
!, of tho country to present the pro-
M gram of tho lnterchurch world move-
B mcnt.
M Tho tour, arranged as a result of Mr.
H Rockefeller's offer to give all his time
H for two weeks," Is preliminary to the I
gj simultaneous financial campaign of
II tho week of April 25 when the thirty
' denominations which are cooperating
Vji through the lnterchurch movement
L&f will seek subscriptions of $336,777,572
mm from tho protcstant population of the
. ni United States.
ffln From Washington, where tho party
& fl stopped today, tho Rockefeller group
I M will go to Pittsburg, Cloveland, De-
! troit, Chicago, Minneapolis, Kansas
J I City, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Buffalo,
I Bk Boston and Philadelphia, returning to
m Now York for a mass meeting Sundav.
! m April 18.
1 il oo
I SPAIN IS PROMISED
. BETTER FILM SHOWS
MADRID, April 5. French motion
H picture producers aro invading Spain,
ik n I where hitherto moving picture shows
11 fc I,ave been of the most mediocre de-
I !i If criptlon, the proprietors of the tho-
1 ;l & uf res refusin& te pay rentals for good
VI K 1icturea- One of tho leading Paris
ll Pr,oducors has purchased theatres at
m Vigo and Bilbao, aud Intends later to
i J m "cqu,iro ,firee theatres in Madrid, Va-
lencla and Seville, where he will dis-
JB play the most modern films. (
Ls V . j -
ij-,. v : !-
FRENCH TO OCCUPY CITIES IN GERMANY I
Conflicting Denmark Forces Agree I
CRIMINAL -INSANE
INMATES ESCAPE;
ONE PERSON SHOT
CHESTER, 111., April 5. An
armed posse is scouring the
Mirsissippi river bottom, south
of Chester, in pursuit of eight
inmates of the Chester state
hospital for criminal insane
who parti cpa ted in the delivery
at the institution late Saturday
night when fifteen men made
their escape after assaulting
and overpowering the night
keeper. Hospital officials said
the men who escaped were con
sidered among the most danger
ous of inmates.
Seven of the men were cap
tured yesterday and last night
and returned to the hospital.
One of the number, Harry
Stork, of Rock Island, 111., was
probably fatally shot when he
resisted captur .
j
POLICy OF ITE1TE
I lacking ii mro
pM!IIM
t
Bclsheviki Crow Over Victor
ies at Opening Session of
Confab Called in Moscow
MOSCOW. March 29. (By the Asso
ciated Press.) Consolidation of party
interests and centralization of depart
mental activities us tho result of Rus
sian victories "on all fronts" was the
'keynote of the soviet government's
I policy by Nikolai Lenine, Bolshevik i
j premier, speaking at the opening ses
sion of the ninth convention of the
j communist party here today. .
I "That this morale of victory hap
pened," he declared, "notwithstanding
the imperialistic world war against us.
jwas due to centralization, sacrifices I
and discipline."
Recent peace proposals received by
the soviet government denoted a
change of "seniiment in the outside
world and an entente policy indicative
of lack of unity," Lenine said, adding,
"our position cannot be determined
from the viewpoint of jurisprudence.'
Representatives of Swedish and
Norwegian workers were welcomed at
I the conference aud a general commit
jtee, which included Lenine. Trotzky
and other Bolshevik leaders, wero
elected.
I
DESTITUTE CIVILIANS
GIVEN EASTER GIFTS
VIENNA, April 5. Four thousand
destitute Austrian civilians, who dur
ing tho war were interned in foreign
prison camps, and who are now tom
porarly lodged lu municipal -barracks
outside this city, received Easier gifts
from tho American Red Cross. Each
received sugar, coffee, cocoa, canned j
meata and crackers, and every child j
wns given a package of chocolates and I
several cans of condensed milk, the
gift of the Junior Red Cross of Amer
ica. Twenty.four hundred pairs of shoes. (
1,000 women and girls' overcoats, 2,000
blankets and 2,000 pairs or stockings
i were also distributed.
VIENNA TO OBTAIN
MILLIONS FROM U. S.
NEW YORK, April 5. A gift of
three million crowns by Amorican
business men has been forwarded to
the mayor of Vienna and the directors
there of the American convalescent
homo for sick aud under-nourished
children of Vienna, it was announced
hero today by the Americnn commit
tee of tho organization which is now
in process of foundation.
oo
CHURCH AT AFTON NOW
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
MONTPELiER, Ida., April 5. Tho
L. D. S. church in Afton has let the
contract for a $30,000 church building,
work on which ia now under way.
Much of the mntorinl is being pur
chased from Montpelicr dealers and
has to be hauled by wagon and team I
a distance of tlfty.milea to Afton.
- x
IFJFILSTKTO
Ei WORKERS m
EMPLOYERS DECIDE
Walkout Proves to Be Highlj'j
Effective in Two Large
National Crises '
DENMARK MINISTRY
MEETING APPROVED
King Christian Forced to Dis
miss Liebe Group After Five j
Days of Excitement
COPENHAGEN, April 5. An agree-1
,ment to end the general strike, which'
resulted in forcing King Christian lo
dismiss the Liebe cabinet, has been,
leached by employers and workmen.
, Tho strike weapon now has been,
employed with surprising effect in two
important constitutional crises. The!
;lirst was in Germany -where the reac- J
tionary government set up by Dr
Wolggang Kapp was forced to relin
J quisli .power at the end of five days.
The success of the strike in this coun
try was almost as speedy.
I The ministry, which has been form
jed, seems to meet with general ?.p,
jproal by the parties. It Is composed
j largely of the permanent secretaries
I of the different governmental depait
! en for the most part to oarry on tlTel
routine of the departments in the gov-!
1 ernments, which is considered purely I
! temporary' in character. The other!
portfolios aro held by men who, al-!
though representative of various po-l
llitical parlies, are not considered as.
likely to make any radical changes
inrthe conduct of thtir departments, j
Tho reinstatement of 11. P. Hanssenj
as commissioner for Schleswig affairs, j
which is announced, has given great
i satisfaction to those who objected toj
I as-annexationist po.licy regarding the J
j disputed northern Schleswig plebiscite!
jzone. It is stated, however, that the,
I appointees' political friends are en-!
Ideavoring to persuade him not to ac
cept the post, fearing that his pres- J
ence in the government would be in!
propaganda against the temporary
cabinet.
uu
MISSISSIPPI ABOUT
TO OVERFLOW BANKS
i
MEMPHIS, Tenn., April 5 Weather
bureau reports today indicated thatj
the crest of the Mississippi river flood
would reach Memphis belore nightfall
with the stage within the forty-one
foot maximum prediction.
I Thus far damage along the Missis
sippi has been confined to the flood
ing of the unprotected lowlands. All
lovees in this district are reported in
good shape and in the opinion of Ma
jor William M. Gardner, In charge of
the United States engineer's office
hero, capable of withstanding a much
groater pressure than would result
from tho present rise. I
OMAHA, Neb., April 5. Forty" fami
lies in an area comprising about two
square miles In North Omaha are ma
rooned, today by the flooded Missouri
river. The river is stationary.
oo ,
BULL FIGHT SEASON I
1 ON IN FULL BLAST
MADRID, April 5. The bull fighting!
season Just opening promises to be1
even more successful than usual. Thel
'strike of banderillos and plcadores ap-l
parently has been satisfactorily set
tled and no trouble is anticipated
when prominent toreadors such as Bel
monte, Galito, Sanchez, Mejiaz and
Chlcuelo, enter the various rings.
Despite a fifty per cent increase in
prices the seats at every ringside
throughout the country have been soid
out, many people paying triple and
quadruple the ordinary prices to wit
ness tho ovents.
oo
POLITICAL ACTIVITY
BY PRIEST BANNED
VIENNA, April 5. Political activity
by any priest while celebrating mass
or preaching at any churcli in Czecho
slovakia -would be made a criminal of
fense under an amendment to the pe
nal code Introduced in the national
assembly of that country by tho min
ister of Justice.
oo
TEN ARE DROWNED.
ANDERSON, S. C, April 5. Ten
persons were drowned near Lowndes
vlllo yesterday by the capsizing of a
ferry on the flooded Savanna ii river.
FIRST SPRING BRIDE'
lICA2PEVTEft
WASHINGTON. April 5. Miss
Frances Carpenter, daughter of Mr.
'and Mrs. Frank , G. Carpenter, will
(start the weddipf ball rolljng for socl-
FCoWlTfrmT nng-LfsotTor
April C, Huntington has been con
nected with the department of com
merce and with the American embas
sy in Russia. ' Miss Carpenter spent
six months abroad working for (he
Y. W. C. A. . v.
STATES IE DIGGING
OUT OF SHOW AFTER
HEAVY EASTER STORM
After "Warm Blizzard" Ex
perts Predict Return to
Balmy Spring Weather 4
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo,
April 5. The blizzard which
Swept Missouri yesterday de-
stroyed the entire peace,, ap- ,
pie, cherry and plum crops, '
causing losses of millions of -dollars,
according to informa
tion received by the state. 1
board of agriculture today.
JOPLIN, Mo., April 5 Low
temperatures that accompa-'
nied Sunday's blizzard will
cut down the size of south
west Missouri's peach and ap
ple crops this year, J. H, H. v
Mote, farm agent of Jasper
county, said today.
"Both crops have been bad
ly damaged, if not ruined, '"he
said. "Buds were out on
trees and many of them un
doubtedly were killed. ' '
CHICAGO, - April 5.-iffhe middle
west and southwest, heartened by
weather bureau predictions of "a re
turn to balmy spring weather," today
set about digging themselves out ol
record-breaking Easter snowfalls. The
"warm blizzard" as offioial forecast
ers designated it, doveloped in the
Texas panhandle and yesljerday swept
rapidly through the central v.' est, to
day continuing steadily eastward, the
snowfall ranging from sl Inches to
two feet.
In the open country o the south
west, cattle were reported to havo suf
fered. There wero few reports of crop
damage, liowever.
By noon yesterday the snow, driven
into hugo drifts by gales that average
35 to 15 miles an hour, had buried rail
road tracks, city boulevards and couu-j
try highways throughout tho affected
regions. 'Suburban and transcontinen
tal trairis movell hoars behind sched
ules, 'elegraph and telephone com
muuicajion was cut off in some sec
tions and in Chicago and some other
cities electric service was crippled.
Whlli. the temperature In portions
of the jsouthwest dropped as low as
twentyfdegrees, in tho central west 27
was th0 minimum, according to re
ports. 1
1
'FRANCE TO PUNISH '
' 1T1 FOR PEACE j
TREATY VIOLATIONS:
i
Troops to Occupy Teuton!
Cities on East Side of Rhine,
Paris Announces j
BRITISH DECLINE TO j
COOPERATE IN MOVEj
Marshal Foch May Decide that j
Teutons Must Pay for Ex- I
pense of Occupation (
i
PAR- April 5. French troops I
commanded by General de GoutteJ
which arc stationed along the Rhine,
are prepared to enter Gorman terri
tory this morning, according to the
Wiesbaden correspondent of the Matin.
It is reported that the French govern
ment nas ueciued to occupy cities on
the right bank of tho Rhine as a re
prisal for the movement of German
government troops Into the neutral
zone fixed by the Versailles trealy.No
official announcement has been made
of such an order, however. .
I Newspapers continue to discuss the
(situation resulting Crohi the entry of
Clares the indications given by the
German note concerning those forces
do not correspond with the information
-received by Marshal Foch. Demand ls
made by the Journal that the expenses
of the occupation be borne by the Ger
mans, and it is suggested that cities
occupied bo taxed to make up this
amount.
British Not Co-operating.
The British government will decline
lo co-operate in the occupation of
Frankfort, Darmstadt .and other Ger
man cities, according to the London
correspondent of the Petit Parisieu.
but will, he says, favorably follow the
action of France, "realizing the im
portance of the situation."
In the southern part of the Ruhr dis
trict, says the a-iCho de Paris, the Ger
man government troops have ad
vanced without resistance, but have
encountered serious opposition in the
central portion of the Ruhr basin. Two
hundred persons ave been killed in a
fight near Duisburg, according to in
formation reaching this city.
French military measures destined
to force the German government to
withdraw its troops from the Ruhr
basin are now entirely In the hands of
Marshal Foch. it was said at the for
eign office today.
Tribute on Cities.
It is advanced in some well informed
quarters that occupation of Frankfort,
Darmstadt, Homburg and Hanau is
unlikely to exercise sufficient pressure
upon the Germans, since they well
argue that this occupation is distaste
ful to the French as well as to them-j
selves, but cannot continue indefinite
ly. On the other hand, the expense of
the operation comes up ns a vital Ques-i
tion in the present state of French
finances. The newspapers recall war
tributes imposed by German troops on
French and -.igian cities and suggest
similar measures beins applied to Gei-
jnan cities occupied by irench troops.
Dispatches from leabaden, saying
General de Goutle's forces are under
"alert" orders, aro explained as not
necessarllv meaning an Immediate ad
vance, buwcomplete readiness to move
forward unless Berlin promptly recalls
the troops which have entered the
Ruhr district against protests from
France. s
No censorshop his been established
on news of the intended operation, but
since the mattor now is entirely in the
hands of Marshal Foch. communica
tions from the army probably will bo
surrounded with the usual precautions,
although tho operation is not consid
ered on a basis of war.
. U. S. Not Informed.
WASHINGTON, April 5 State de
partment officials said today they had
received no notice from Franco of Itii
intention to havo tho French troops
occupy cities on the oast bank as a
reprisal for the advanco of German
forces into the Ruhr valley neutral
zone.
The last official word regarding
troop movements in this territory was
received last Thursday, officials said,
with the arrival of the German note
informing the American government
that it was sending soldiers into the
district to re-establish order.
Tho United States notified the allies
more than a week ago it would offer
no objection to the movement of Ger
man troops into the valley if they
were withdrawn as soon as conditions
aro normal. j
j
j ,
PRISON INMATES
BECOME MAGNETS,
DOCTORS PUZZLED i
ALBANY, N. Y., April 5.
Botulinus poisoning has taken
an unusual form at Dannemora, !
state prison. Thirty prisoners j
now suffering from the disease,
it is said, are "full of electric
ity," their bodies active as mag- ;
nets for small pieces of metal i
and paper. They are thought (
to have become affected I
through eating salmon which
was packed in tins, according to I
a report by T3r. Ransom, the I
prison surgeon. I
The malady first appeared '
several weeks ago, and caused
the death of two prisoners and
loss of sight to others.
1 WIDOWS ARE
: FLOCKING TO 0. 8f
:!E N ARE LEAlG
Dangerous Tendency Present in
Immigration, Bureau State
ment Points Out
NEW YORK, April 5. Foreign war
widows, pensioners of their govern
ments, and other industrial non-producers,
mostly women, constitute the
larger part of the immigrants now
coming to this country, according to
a statement issued by the Inter-racial
Council.
Immigration officials of this port
state that women and girls have in the
last few wepks outnumbered the men
two, and some times, three to one.
Tho fact appears to be well establish
ed, the council declares, that somo of;
the foreign governments are enforcing
a policy which encourages the emigra
tion of women, but places obstacles in
the way of able-bodied male workers.
Meanwhile, emigration from Amer
ica is made up almost entirely of meif
who have given up employment in fac
tories, mills and mines to return lo
their home land, taking with them sav
ings estimated conservatively at $2000 1
for each emigrant. Since tho signing
of the armistice, 275,000 emigrants
have left the country and authorities
believe that approximately 1,125,00'J
more will leave when present port
regulations and conditions permit. To
consider the problem the natioiu-.l
council on emigration will be held in
New York next Wednesday attended
by representatives of Industry, agri
culture, finance and labor groups. Thej
chief purpose is to determine upon aj
i policy ol selective immigration that
.will best serve the interests of ' tho
country and to recommend the adop-i
tion of such a policy by congress. I
oo I
'ARCHDUKE'S DAUGHTER
WILL MARRY BARON
BUDAPEST, April 4. The youngest
daughter of Archduke Frederick, the
Archduchess Mary Alice, has become
engaged to marry Baron Frederic
Haldbot, who is a scion of an old
Prussian family. Frederic is thirty
years old and at present is employed
in a commercial bank In Budapest
He lias a salary of five thousand
kronen annually, which under the
present exchange rate is worth about
twenty dollars.
The father of the bride-to-be was
the richest man in the former monarchy.
oo
FOOD ADMINISTRATOR j
KILLED BY HUNGRY MOB
VIENNA, April 6. Famine condi
tions prevail in Slovakia, according to
reports received here. It is reported
that people aro collapsing in tho
streets, due to hunger, and that there
have been hunger riots in various dis
tricts. In Karschau the .populace In
vaded the office of the Czech food con
troller and dragged him to the street
and killed , him. The soldiers there
upon fired on the crow.d, killing twelvo
persons'.
CHICAGO POEICE III (I
READINESS FOR DUTY
IN RAILROAD YARDS I
Train Service Through District 1
Tied Up by Spread of Un- jl
authorized Strike . LU
2500 EMPLOYES ARE H
1 IDLE SAYS REPORT H
Demands of Outlaw Organiza-
tion Include More Pay and IH
Shorter Work Day
CHICAGO. April 5. Fifty thousand j-
stockyards' employes will be thrown $
'out of work tonight as a result of the H
! strike of switchmen in the Chicago
.railroad yards, officials of the packing
companies announced this morning. jH
Five thousand were laid off when they jH
reported for work today and others ,
I will fnllnw ctnnn nc 1hr aninll rn. IH
ccipls of animals on hand are disposed jH
of. Only 3,500 cattle, 5,000 hogs and
500 sheep reached tho stockyards to
day, as compared to receipts of forty
thousand hogs alone a year ago. IH
Cannot Move Cars. .
An embargo on all express ship
ments was announced. this morning bj
the American Railway Express' com-. .
pan v.. QfUpialSfiSaid the blizzards yes ; J
Lerday, combined with the switchmen's
strike, had made It impossible to niove y jH
cars in the local yards. . L
A. F. Whitney, vice president of thft
Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen,
which has branded the strike as "ille- d
gal" and in violation of the. men's
agreement with the roads, has taken
personal charge of the efforts lo break J ,
tho walkout.
Union Strikebreakers.
Brotherhood men from other cities
began arriving here this morning In re
sponse to Whitney's appeal for union I
"strikebreakers," and union officials '
hope to have enough men at work by ,
night to keep essential business uiov- ) ll
Chicago's milk supply was seriously '
threatened this morning, but railroad,
officials said the would make every
effort to keep milk trains running. IH
CHICAGO, April 5. Train service lH
throughout the Chicago district, al- IH
ready seriously crippled by a heavy H
snowstorm, virtually was demoralized jH
today by the spread of an unauthorlz iH
ed, strike of switciimcn, according to 'H
reports from the eleven railroads af-
fected. I M
Fearing possible riots, John J. Gar- '
rity, chief of police, early today placed " .
the entire force in reserve. JFlve hun-, j
idred policemen patrolled the switch- ll
I ing yards, he said. ,( JH
Mr. Garrity said the, situation was n
serious and added that "it may bo
I necessary to call out' the militia and .
I declare military control in the rail- j IH
roal yards." jH
I Approximately 2500 switchmen were
out at midnight, according to strike
leaders, and the General Managers' as
soeiution, representing the railroads.
The strikers asserted that nine thou
sands men would be affected today
aud predicted a "complete . tie-up of
freight traffic and serious impairment jH
of mterurban service." . j.
Declare No Compromise.
After a long conference -with repre-
seulatives of the Brotherhood of Rail
way Trainmen with which the switch- ,H
men are affiliated and, the Qwitch- 'H
men's Union of North America, the
i General Managers' association issued
a declaration that there would "be no
compromise" with the strikers. Ul
"Sixty per cent of the switch en--gines
in Chicago are out of service,"
said the managers' statement. "This ,
has been caused by an outlaw orgam- !
zation which has presented demands j
for rates of pay that already had been i
presented to the railroad organizations
by the Brotherhood of Railway Train
men and the Switchmen's Union o(
North America.
"These demands are being handled
by tho wage conference at Washing
ton and must, under the transporta-v
tion act, be concluded before the labor
board yet to be named by tho presl-
dent."
The statement added that alUrail
roads centering here have contra zti
with the striking switchmen. i
Strike Held Illegal.
Officials of tho two big unions have
declared the strike "illegal," ordered
tho men to return to work and are, co
operating with the rail heads in at- "j
tempting to break the strike.
The trouble broke five days ago,
switchmen in the Chicago district ' d
yards of' the 'Chicago, Milwaukee and. ' ,
St. Paul railroad going on strike. The (
Illinois Central and tho Northwestern Ii 'H
next wero affected, the' strike spreatlr v ii JmM
(Continued On Page 4) ,
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