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The Ogden standard-examiner. [volume] (Ogden, Utah) 1920-current, January 31, 1921, LAST EDITION, Image 1

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TktNo 3-9 a OGDEN CITY, UTAH. MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 31, 1921. LAST EDITION 4 P. M.
FORMAL REQUEST MADE FOR RAIL WAGE CUTS I
iOLICE RESCUE KIDNAPED CALIFORNIA WOMAN I
. . , . .
lMh American Merchants
1 "Suse to Accept and Pay
for Shipments
1 MONEY. LOW PRICES
BRINGABOUT DISPUTE
' M Side Must Take Loss.
iieno$ Aires Lawyer
i!m Saysinjpeech
"Wr
Ml. .
I MrVar i
M'r,,; "",V " A'"-
-:-'M; "
' JjK He ' 5
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' tXfIC trid thrutiKh the of "
auyH -'
, Mi'tir r - 'he li.'un.b. '
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i ,-,Iiri i"K i i. km w i i n ; .
I. J(B cBf.lrr."i.'. tJ i the
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itlsJLmW1''' ' '
' IBfcouS pOIll'.'i it I. ivi
i I jKlt hold aloof ili i pi .! mi ms; hii
j,,sj3BJlil h.izirclin it futuie "ii tho
EiaKf Miir-
(yHw chamber in Ithc-Iid.
'triiBBBL
' c-( 'Ik K..r.'.n
53s qHMll iy ihi ; rut. ; t
:;to TRAPPED OM
, : :.lH0OF FALL INTO RUINS,
IMjincn. r. , icli-
pu(kWwen u!i' 1,,'jrci wii" ii i ill
jajM'""1' lt ' M:thev .ii
(T '"j' lbr '1 arc . .i to
- S.
totkjK'' .! n, v.is ,
CoiHwH or. tho i l ,,
litklVV- :h"- r....t wall a!
My fir"'".i v-" re hurl.-,; into
M- ' ir " nrnva.-U-s In the
e PM V' with blazing
yjj,M n: ,JJt u'" livng 1 i th
cbB'j'
'Mi' M ' ""
: STATU GRACES
; : INEWST. JOAN CHURCH
IX41T1 rap 'I l"r- :i. Ii vll'-l
rtM.- " i. the first In
lost
KVih" -1 in tho
f NV5H4E 0L cut
ol AGAINjy REFINERIES
M ' ";'
v IL
1 IS ".
Abductors Trapped
Through Cleverness
j Of Telephone Girl
Two Cousins Fall Into Clutches of Law After Mrs. Vitherell
Is Found Prisoner in Shack on California
Sheep Ranch
I, os ANGEILES, ( a). .Jau. 31. Mrs. jQladys Witherell, who lis
l appeared from her lionie here last Tuesday, was found early thj
I morning, a prisoner in a small house on a sheep rancb eight miles
'east of Corona, in Riverside county, about 7; miles southeast of Los
Angeles, according to telephone messages to the Associated Tress.
Two irivn who pare their names as
. J. .ind Floyd Carfi .oiisini, wire
1 1 sled.
COI SINS CONTESS.
The fliicovory of Mrs. Witherell and
the arrest of tho two Carr men were
affected by Los Ahgelea police ;iiii
deputy sheriffs, win. started tor Los
I rVngctes vith the women and the two
1 arrested m n.
Tb officers salil tlic c.'arrs i-onfcss-"d
ihey had llL-feolins toward th- wo
man's father-lQ-laT, a. j Witherelli
j Iwiauss of a transaction Involving a
boat; and thai they kidnaped Mrs.
Witherell btth to oinain revenue anu
ransom money, of which, ii was said,
thr-y li.nl demanded $20.0u0.
(.n. i. ISFFEI i - . i iti ui:
a telephone orepaior's quick witi i
ness Kd to the Ulscovory oi .Mrs. With
crcll and the C'arr's arrest. Tho oper
ator received a call from a pay sta
tion for tho residence oi O. Wither t
ell and deiued making tne call unill
the nloe had ben sent to the pay
station whore they arretted A. J. Carr
just as lio was oontludlng a delayed
conversation which he had promised
relatives in a letter sent thsin Satur
day. I ill,K01 KM I i i.
Tho police siiiu the?" found chlpBO
form and other articles in nls automo
bile tliey believed h.'id born used In
decoying the woman from home.
Al the pollc- station, Carr, it was
said, confessed that he had spent Sat
urday night out :dde of Los Angeles,
afraid to communicate with the With
orells as ho had agreed by letter. Floyd
Carr, according to the confession of
his CO USUI, was the loader in tno kld-
naping.
U OM W KIO.N Al'Ln.
The police said A. J. Carr mill them
that Floyd c.iir went to tho Witherell
home last Tuesday nlKht and told Mrs.
witherell a friend had been Injured in
an automobile accident and was call
ing for her
Floyd Carr. according to tho po
lice, escorted her to an automobile,
where A. J (."arr was Waiting hen
siio became suspicions ih. iwo men
chloroformed her Tney took her to
a small house on a sheep ranch and
put her in a room with only a cot and
two blankets.
Mrs Witherell told tho men who
rescued her the men bought her candy
and treated her 'with every respect."
DOOllS KUASIIKU IN.
The police and -Mrs llheerll's hus
band and father started for the kid
naper's house at 2 o'clock today pre
pared for any emergency. The officers
Mirrounded tho house and after clos
ing on It, smashed the floor and win
dows. A man said to be Floyd Carr,
was caught off his guard and handcuf
fed. Mn-. Witherell and her husband
rushed into each other's arms
She sobbed and called him "Lambie,
limbic" over and over uiftiln.
The scene between Mrs Witherell
and her father, John C. Kratz, was as
affecting.
.Mrs. Witherell was rescued shortly
after 5 o clock and BOOH after the en
tire party start d lor Los Angeles. The
'"airs wore said by the police to have
implicated others In the alleged kid
naping. Tho number arled (torn five to sev
en They were also ttid to have di
rected the relatives of the woman to
deposit the ransom of JJO.OnO on a
lonely designated spot, promising to re
lease Mrs. Witherell on the roadside
where she could bo found after pay-
muni ny f r-.n-
DLATilii DM CASK.
Howards totalling $3,i00 were of
fered for information as to Mrs. Wlth
erell's whereabouts. Witherell -s for
mi r bvjslness partner and former sten
ographer, Charles Beverley, and Mrs.
Kloda Wcstrem Tenney. were killed
SOZlj Saturday in an automobile acci
dent while detectives were following
them into Los Angeles from a suburb.
Why they were followed was unex
plained RUES FOB B HV
"I want my baby, 1 want my bab,"
Mrs. Witherell cried over and over
Ogain on the two-hour dri from the
Cabin on a sheep ranch, where she was
found,
hen she again had her arms clasp
ed about her cighteen-months-old son
Jack, sh, regained her composure.
Police Captain Alfred T. Slaylou,
of Los Angeles, led ibo officers who
rescued' Mrs Wetherell. He was the
first to break into the house.
"Don't hurt me." she cried. "i
haven't clone anything. 1 am Mrs.
Witherell and l want my baby. Please
take mo away fiom here if you aie a
friend."
Rl SH IS STOPPED.
Slay ton said he heard a noise behind
him. He turned and searched the
room with hlsjflashlight, A man with
B revolver in "his hand was emerging
from a closet
"Throw up your hands" Sloyton
called, covering the man with his own
revolver.
The answer was a rush, before
Slayton could shoot, his flashlight was
knocked from hi hand. A struggle
followed. Other officers dashed Into
the room and the man was overpov,
erod He gave his name ;u Floyd Carr.
Jxtra guards wore placed about the
Clly Jail where the Cans were held
here, j
f
WILSON MS
HEM ASKED TO
LIBERATE BEOS
Attorney General Palmer's Re
quest for Commutation Is
i urned Down Quickly
W 1SHTXGTOX, Jan. i Prcsldenl
Wilson refused today ti commute the
ten rear sentence Imposed upon Ku
gene . Debs foi violation ..i the
espionage act.
The prcsldenl disapproved n recom
mendation of the department of lus
tioo that Debs' scnteuced be com
muted 1 1 1 expire on next Februarj
WASHING ;TiN. Jan. ::i -Commutation
of the sentence of Kugene V
Debs, effective next February 12, has
l been recommended to President Wil
son by tho department Of justice, it
was learned today at the white House
Mr. Palmer's recommendation was
placed before the president this
morning and lt was reported at first
Lh it the erecutive has acted upon 11
favorably This latter was found to
! be erroneous, however. and White
'House officials said they had no lntl-
mation as to When action would be
t:.lcen or what the president would do.
Dobs, many times Socialist party
candidate for president entered the
penitentiary at Atlanta, Ga . on June
16, 10 IS, to servo a ten years' sen
1 tenco imposed following conlctlon by
, a federal Jury at Cleveland. C, Sep
tember 12, 1918, for violation of the
1 espionage act.
fn
SOUTH AMERICANS GREET
FLEET WiTH ENTHUSIASM
CALLAU, Peru, Jan. 31. Three
i United States destroyer divisions under
command of Captam Kenneth Bennett.
a; rived here yesterday afternoon.
I forming the advance guurd of the
United States Atlantic fleet, which
will pay a visit to Peruvian waters
ThS American ships were given an
1 enthusiastic reception, tho docks be
ing orowdod with people, who com
mented on the splendid Impression
made by the little war vessels.
The official program arranged for
! tho entertainment of the officers and
I crvws of the American ships will be
I gin tomorrow . with the arrival of the
battleship squadron of the fleet. Ad
miral Henry Li. WIInoii, com mandcr-in-chief,
will go to Lima for the purpose
of paving a visit to President Leguio,
tho foreign minister of marine A
four-day holiday, beginning tomor
row and ending February 3 has been
declared by the president.
SANTA ELLNA. Ecuador. Jan. 30
A Chilean fleet, commanded by Ad
miral Gomez Careno, passed this port
today and exchanged wireless saluta
tions with government officials here.
It went northward to meet the Ameri
can Pacific fleet which Is on its way to
Valparaiso. Radio messages were ex
changed by tho fleets during the day.
MEXICANS MUST EXPLAIN
OiL POLICY TO AMERICA
MEXICO CITY, Jan. 31. Careful
; study Is being given the latest United
j States government note regarding oil
: properties In Mexico and the Mexican
I government will probably answer it
I during the present week,
j Washington demanded, according to
the Excelsior, a revision of pernios to
drill oil wells granted by Jacinto B
Tie. inc. former minister of InduStr)
and commerce, and Included with its
note a list of oil companies whose In
terests would be s'rloirsly affected it
' the permits were allowed to stand
le- Is stated that the opinion pre
vails among government officials th
United States government will not In
sist upon its demands and will awall
the deve lopment "t President bre
I gen's peti t. lorn policy.
oo
WILSON TO VISIT CAPITOL
AFTER 2-YEAR ABSENCE
j WASHINCTOX, Jan. 31. President'
Wilson was represented todjy as huv - !
log decided to no to the executive room ;
I of tho oapitol on the morning of March j
4 to sign bills passed In the closing
I hours or this session and which onl.l 1
' not become law unless approved bi - ,
I fore adjournment of this congress. It
will bo his first visit to the capitol In
nearly two year-. '
JOHNSON WANTS
REPORT ON JAP
TREATY PUBLIC
West Entitled to Know Now
What Document Contains,
He Says
CALIFORNIA SENATOR
THINKS COLBY WRONG
Future of Agricultural Land At:
L Stake, Lawmaker Declares
in Statement
I WASHINGTON. Jan. 31 People of I
'western states are "entitled to know!
land know now," what disposition of
the Japanese settlement problem is
made in the tentative. Shldehorn-Mor-jris
treaty. Senator Johnson. Republic-
I an. California, declared today 111 a
I formal statement. lie reiterated that
the troatv In effect repealed the C.ili
ifomla alien l?nd laws.
1 Referring to his oWn statement of!
Ilnsl week and Secretary Colby's com
nient upon It Senator Johnson said:
SOM1 i'.' tDI 1. W K
i "Tho secretary of state says that
j my comment upon the tentative .ii. I
Intents made by Ambassadors Shlde
jharn and Morris is based upon in
erroneous assumption.' and that the
dangers which 1 suggest do not pre-;sc-nt
themselves to these agreements.
My comment was induced by prc r. -porta
purporting t" emunale from au
thentic sources. From these i stated
'a treaty had lxon tentatively agreed
I upon which In effect repealed the
I California alien land laws The s.-. -
rotary of state says in substance this
lis not so Either th$ press report.-,
lare erroneous or Mr - Colby Is misinformed-
I am constrained to beKevo
that Mr. Colby IS In error-
CONTROVERS1 BESIDE MARX
j "But a controversy between the
'secretary of state and myself as to
j what Is contained In the report of
I Ambassador Morris is of no conse
quence. The contents of the report
!iro all important. Mr. Colby has the
report. The people of the west to
whom this subject is of paramount
Importance, are entitled to know what
'that report contains Yesterday It was
discussed at length in Japan. Our
people should not have to await its
detail through Japanese nows channel-.
I "It is not sufficient that the repre
sentatives from California or the for
, oign relations' committee, under a
promise of secrecy. should finally
IknOw what disposition lu Intended to
bo made of the agricultural lands of
California and other western states
The people of these western states are
entitled to know it now
EST SHOULD BE T M
"The grave question here is not
jwhether I am right in saying that a
treaty has been presented which In
effect repeals our alien land Jaws or
I whether Mr. Colby Is right in saying
that no such draft of a treaty has
I boon presented. Tho matter Is far be
lyOnd personal controversy. The ques
tion is what has been done on the sub
jeet In which the west Is most inter
ested and w hich, most Intimately con
cerns Dip west's future. And the west
should be told forthwith."
ENGLISH PAPER DERIDES
TERMS HANDED GERMANS
LONDON. Jan. 31 Allied repara
tion terms decided upon by tho su
preme counell In Paris last week were
described as "folly" by tho Manches
ter Guardian today. The newspaper
said "wo may bo thankful the terms
can nevor bo executed."
, In the opinion of this Journal, Ger
many will be able to pay Indemnities
only by exported goods.
If she exported every year an ad
ditional i, "oo o t uOii worth of goods
to Franco, England and Belgium," tho
lieu -i ;' 'the outci ral gg. .
con pel Ins menu I id Vo
countries would be heart-rending. It
I ts already audible."
iVTADOO SEEKS RETURN
OF MEXICAN R. R. LINES
1 MEXICO CITY. Jan. .11. William
G. McAdoo, former secretary of the
United States treasury, was not conta
ins to Mexico on a mission Of a po-
lltlcal character, a high official of the
foreign relations department said last
night He slated further that Mr. M .-
lAdoo waa representative of Ameri
can stockholders of the National Ball
way company and would take part In
I tho negotiations with the Mexican
government icgarding their return of
the National lines to their owners:
ANNUAL REVIEW OF
OGDEN'S PROGRESS
The Ogdon Standard i Ian miner's
innnal Iterlcw of Ogtlen Industrial
rinjuidnl and building progress win
be Issued on WHhiesdaj evening,
i obruarj 2 Persons desiring ex
tra copies of tiuv imic containing
twenty-six pages, devoted to iid
review, thould pis llteti i i ib-r-.
i at mi" .
I
VICTOR BERGER 1
WINS OUT IN
SUPREMECOURT
Conviction of Socialist Editor
in Judge Landis' Court
Is Reversed
CHICAGO JURIST IN
ERROR, OPINION HOLDS
Case of Ousted Congressman
Second to That of Debs
in Interest
WASHINGTON. Jnn. 31 Convic
tion of Vic tor J, Berger and four nth-
erSj members of the Socialist party,
for violation of the espionage act. was
reversed today by the supreme court j
on the ground that Judge Eanclls.
should not have heard the suit after
l.K eligibility had been attr.eked.
The effort of the court's decision is"
to remand the cases to tho appclat3,
division which will issue orders for al
reversal and a now trial before some j
other federal Judge. ,
Those convicted with Berger In the;
federal court at Chicago were Adolph
Gartner, national secretary of the par-,
Ly,. William F. Kruse, editor of tho
Young Socialists magazine, J. Louis'
lOngduhl and lrwln J. St. John-Tucker.,
PKK.M DK E BARGED.
Bergep and the other four men were
convicted under the section prohibit
ing attempts to cause Insubordination
and disloyaltv in the naval and mill-'
tary forces, and sentences from ono'
to twenty year.s were Imposed. j
Tho appeal was brought to the su
prome court on the ground that Judge
Kenefuvv Mountain ixmclls, who pre
I sided at the trial, had shown 'per
sonnl Idas nnd pf ejudlce,,-'iigirist 'the
defendants because of the'r naton
lallty. I The court divided C to 3, Justice
iuv. Pitney and McReynolds dissent-4
jing.
Mr. Reynolds added to the dissent
ing opinion a strong approbation of
Judge Landis' sentiments as merely
'showing his detestation of the f Hun
Inlsh warfare which was being backed
ly compatriots In America." under
our too Indulgent laws.
The majority opinion held that the
affidavit Of prejudice filed by Borgor
against Judge Iandls was sufficient
to have caused his withdrawal from
the ease and that Judge Landis him
self was not Justified in passing upon
the affidavit.
I Justice lay who filed a dissenting
opinion, held, however, that the mere
filing of an affidavit should not be ac
cepted as sufficient evidence of die
unfairness of the Judge The Berger
affidavit should not be taken at "face
value," he said, because 'the facts,"
t hi n ln had been made solely on "in
formation and belief" and no attempt
was mado to suisianiiato tnem
ITTRAt ITS ATTENTION.
Next to that of Eugen V. Debs, tho
case of ictor Berger, publisher of tho
Milwaukee Leader, a Socialist paper,
attracted more attention than any oth
ed brought by the government under
wartime espiotiage act. Berger was
accused of disloyalty and was convict
ed at Chicago on January 8, 1919. Sub
sequently ho was twice denied a seat
in the house of representatives by that
body and the third time he offered for
ie-(-i ( tion he was defeated.
Four other leaders of the Socialist
party were convicted with the Milwau
kee publisher. They were Adolph
; Germer, secretary of the National So
cialist party. W llliam F. Kruso, editor
Of tho Young Socialist, Irwin St. John
Tucker, writer and speaker, and J.
Louis Lngdahl, editor of the Ameri
can Socialist, Sentences ranging from
ten to twenty years were Imposed by
Federal Judge Kenesaw Mountain
Landis
CHARGES MANY,
The five defendants were charged
specifically with having conspired to
obstruct recruiting and Interfere with
' the delivery of speeches and tho clrcu
latin of articles intended Co cause "In
subordination, disloyalty and refusal
of duty" among naval and military
forces of the United States. Numerous
articles written by Bergor for the
i Leader were presented as evidence
i against him.
Bl RG1 K I K I B kRRED.
A movement to bar Berger from the
1 seat In congress to which ho had Judl
I been elected from a Milwaukee district,
was at once started, Representative
f Mann, former Republican leader being
i ono of the few influential members of
the house wbi) came out in bclialt ot
I the Socialist editor. A new election
having been ordered. Berger was iiRam
return, d and again the house voted 10
bar him, 3;'S t t. within an hour after
he had presented himself to be sworn
,1m
I tPER IN mi l ICULTIES
i The Milwaukee leader in the mean!
1 time was sharing the troubles of lis
dltor, Barred from the malls under
an order of Postmaster Burleson, the
paper sought a mandamus in tin fed
eral courts to h ive its privileges restor
ed. The writ was refused and tho COSC
I was carried by successive stages to the
Supreme court. Udring the course of
the litigation. Berger of fci ed to change
tho entire polio;, of his paper If the
postofflce department would withdraw
its order, explaining tht he owed this
sacrifice to those who had invested
their money in the- publication al his
I nehest.
oo
KING ALBERT AND QUEEN
LEAVE TO VISIT MADRID
BRUSSELS, Jan. 31 King Albert
and Queen Elizabeth left yesterday
lor a week s visll to Madrid.
LABOR BOARD ASKED II
TO CANCEL AGREEMENT
MADE WITH EMPLOYES I
the iTnited states unless (hay are assured immediate means for a. ,
reduction in operating expenses, the railroad Mbor board Tvas to!4 1
toda by the Association ! Bailw&j Executives. YV. W. Atterbury, H
chainuan of !: labor ii.iiimittee of the railway executives organic IH
zation, made tin prediction. rl
I .1 i ... ... i , mm naaniinH l'ni fori- H
i
BABE BORN AFTER
MOTHER IS KILLED
IN MOTOR CRASH
MTLWAtJK.EE, Wis.. Jan. 31 A
Child was born o.irlv today by a
Caesarian operation performed rn
a Itaclne hospital a few minutes
after the niothl t had died of ill- i
juries received when a ;:-ain struck
an automobile live others were I
seriously Injured The child will
live, physicians said. The woman
was the mother of six other clul
DAY'S NEWS OF
CRIME MARKED
BYJflOLENCE
CLEVELAND. O.. Jan. 31. Miss
Grochen Brandt, 37. was found
beaten and stabbed to death this
I mornlnp in her room at the. home
of her brother-in-law. Lr. Lester
Slemen, with whom, she made her
home. The head was crushed and
there weio numerous knife
wounds on the body Robbery
was believed to have been tho
motive for the crime. $500 worth
of Jewelry heln missing.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. The
Commonwealth National bank
at Reedvillc, Va. a village 100'
miles from here, was robbed of
cash and securities totalling $11 9,J
00 and then set on fire, according
to reports received today by the
Washington police department.
DETROIT. Mich.. Jan. 31
Three detectives were shot and
seriously wounded by threes ban
dits, who this morning held up
and robbed the Morton Bond com
pany's offices in tho public .square
downtown. At the hospital. It was
said two of the detectives proba
bly will die. Tho bandits escaped
with $10,000 In Liberty bonds,
according to the police report.
ALABAMA GUARDSMAN
ON TRIAL FOR LYNCHING
HAMILTON, Ala.. Jan. 31. Ser
Igeant Robert L. Lancastor. one of
i nine members of Companj 5f, Ala
bama national guard, was to ko on
trial late today In connection with the
Llynchlng of William Halrd. a miner,
i for whose death nine guardsmen were
indicted- The prosecution decided to
iglve the meu separate trials.
Citizens of Tuscaloosa, the homo of
'the guardsmen who wore on duty in
the miners" strike zone, Uiave raised
la defense fund and employed counsel
for the accused who are little more
than boys.
John Northcuti, Baird'a father-in-law,
was killed by James .Morns, a
guardsman, December 22. Morris was
killed shortly afterward. Halrd was
sought and surrendered Christmas
! night, lie was taken from Jail at
I Jasper January 13 and shed to death
by masked men. The guardsmen were
implicated In the lynching by a taxi
icab owner.
MEXICO PLANS ARMY OF
80.000 BY CONSCRIPTION
Mexico city Jan. 31. Organisa
tion of tho Mexican army totalling S0.
000 men would be provided under
plans drawn by IShrlQUS Estrada, min
ister of war. and member of the Kcn
oral staff of Ihe army. Compulsory
military service would be authorised.
Youths between the ages of 18 and
would be enrolled. Tho proposal
will be submitted to President Obie
gon to bo laid before, congress if he
approves of it,
F0RDHAM BASEBALL STAR
RESIGNS TEXAS LEAGUE
NEW YUK, Jan. 31. Al Le Fovre,
former Fordham university baseball
star, who was released by the Ww
York Nationals to th.. San Antonio
club of the Texas league last fall, to-
j day sent his unsigned contract to tho
Texas league club, in announced he
Intended to give ail his time to buSl
I nes.-(.
oral officials that if there was imme- Isbbbbbb!
dial? abrogation of the war-time na- I jH
Lionel agreements Involving working Msbbbbh
rules and conditions, they would not rliSBBBH
seek a reduction of basic wages for at o kiH
b ust thro.- months nftci the order be- rllBBBBH
comes effective, saying the interval risBBBBH
would I... used to test out the efficacy hisbbbI
of economies which might be insti- llijsjssssl
tutcd free from tho limitatons of pres- lissssH
ent agreements. ; ril
MIST CX'T WAGES,
L" ultimately, fejowever, it was state.. ' iitsssssa
there would bo need for a reduction J(j
in basic wagca If the cost of operating til iSSH
the road Is to be cut to a point who). ! It issB
rates may be reduced. iltR isssl
As a measure of Immediate relief, ' i
the roads atk the board to abrogate I ju
at once the agreement fixing the basi L
rates of unskilled labor at 38 to "18 1-2 j
cents an hour. They argued that this i ll
Was a higher rate than was being paid
other industries and that it operated to
tho disadvantage of other employers,
particularly farmers.
The roads proposed that rules and
working conditions in effect Decern bei
31. 1917, be re-established.
t I Ml SET i KARGES.
"Many railroads are not now earn
1 ing and with present operating cdsts
land traffic, have no prospect of earn-
inir even then- bare operating ex-
pclises," said General Atterbury'- " This
leaves them without any net return '
i and unablc to meet their fixed
I charges."
He said that the emergency mlgh
be met either by an advance in freight
and passenger rates or a reduction in
operating expenses, adding,: ,
"ith declining prices and wages In
industry and agrlculturo the countrv
I demands that the solvency of the rail
i roads must be assured by u reduction
I in operating expenses and not be a
further advance in rates."
LAST TO (.il P
lie said that as railway vvages'wero
the lust to go up, so they should bo
the best to come down.
Wartime agreements were wasteful
expedients born of an emergency, ac-
cordlnjr to 1.010 ral Atterbury and ho
quoted President Wilson and the pro
! nouncemenls of the board itself in an
endeavor to show that the agreements
then instituted were not Intended to
live beyond the war
"The national agreements, rules and
working conditions forced on the rail-
roads, as war measures," the state- j
ment Siivs ' o.nisn iti-okc waste anil in- iBSSl
efficiency.
HOW TO mam: SAVING
"I estimate that the elimination of
this waste would reduce railwas oper
latlng expenses at least $300,000,000 per
annum, lt would be far better to re-
store this sum by restoring conditions
of efficient and economical operation
than to reduce wages.
"Wo believes that as the wages of
railroad employes were the lust to go
' ui. they should ho the hist to conftl
down, but we do Insist that for an am- '
! pie wage, an honest day's work shall !
! be given. '
i "The public has a right to insist that j
this must be obtained. The public hat
also the right to expect that the ruV j
; way executives, with the co-operation I I
I of the regulatory bodies and the em- i
Iployes, will as rapidly as possible re- j
Iduce the cost of railway operation so 1
I as to eventually insure a reduction in
1 rates. Litlmateiy a read justnont of j
basic wages will be reipilrcd. Mem
while it is to the interests of all con- J
I cemod, including labor, that the rules '
and working conditions shall be mad(
conducive to tho highest efficiency in j
output per man. j
lt( Kl Ml M DEt 11)1..
"It rests entirely with your board
to determine within the next few days "1
whether Oils whole situation shall drift
into chaos and orderly procedure be- i
t como impossible except at the price t
of railroad bankruptcy, financial I
shook and still wider unemployment."
Conditional upon the abrogation of
the national agreements by the laboi j !
board, the roads ask In addition that
! the basic rates for unskilled labor. .JjM
'fixed at 39 to-48 1-2 cents per hour l
In the award of July, 1920, bo Imme- L !';f
dintely retracted. The plea Is made , ii
I that inasmuch as rates for unskilled '
j labor In other industries have been ; il '
greatly reduced since the award be- ' j )
came effective, the high scnle on th. ',
railroads works to the disadvantage ill isBB
1 of other employers and "beam with l'Jl ssssl
grave Injustice upon the great body rUf
of our farmers."' -Ji?
The appeal is concluded with the Vfll
laration that "In. our Judgement. !'sssssl
j unless the proposed ineasures aio tak- ' l1ifssssB
on promptly hy your board, a situation ' i LiBSBi
Will shortly develop in which orderly itbibbb1
proceduii will !..- oie .-ntirelv iinpo?,- i
00 I1Ibibbb1
MAINE GOVERNOR DIES
0F DYPHTHERIC INFECTION
ANGUSTA, Maine. Jan. 31.-- End lslt n BBBBsl
rick 11 Parkhursti governor o' Maine. N&'iLsiBBl
died todav lie failed to recover from 'l itt lsssSB
the efforts of a dyphthorlc infection ti Ui LibbbI
under the tongue with which he was ilfiaTBSSSsI
nt tacked three weeks ago. Apparent!: i SffBssssI
in- was improving until latae last nigiu liigllBBsssI
j w hen ho took chills and became un on 1 )
'scions Death followed at '.'"13 today. il'TItlBSSSsl

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