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The Ogden standard-examiner. [volume] (Ogden, Utah) 1920-current, September 06, 1922, LAST EDITION - 4 P. M., Image 2

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Hw ?t I (04RKTnL -iilwanw i'TOiw T,,iMirl m ,1 i
2 THE OGDEN STANDARD-EXAMINER WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTFmdpm
I GIVES DEFENSE
OF INJUNCTION
Order Will Not Be Used to
Abridge Personal Liberty,
Says Daugherty
WIASHIKGTOX, Sept. 6. (By tho
Associated Press.) Tho Injunction ob
tained in Chicago against striking
Fhopmen by the government. Attorney
General Paugherty said will not be
used to abridge personal liberty, nor
mil freedom of speech or tho press
be interfered with. But, he added
"freedom of speech ami freedom of
press does not mean those mediums
may bo used to inrlte riots or mur
ders." Tho attorney ten, ral also de
clared that the Injunction had not
been obtained to ftfr.ee men to work,
nor was (t a move to prevent strikes,
FESEL8 JUSTIFIED.
The statement of Mr Pnughcrt,
which was made to newspaper corres
pondents, followed earlier declara
tions by a W hite House spokesman
after Tuesday's cabinet meeting that
Preslrlnt T-T n rd I n u fi.lt tho Inlunr-tlim
would not in any way endanger con
stitutional right of the men on strike
or of other citizens. But, it was lea
ded, the Chicago Injunction pro
ceeding! would be. followed up with
tho determination of preventing Inter
ference with transportation.
Just how far the government would
bo obliged to go with prosecutions
against Individuals, tho White House
spokesman said, could only bo de
termined by events. It was Indicated
that no activities In conneetlon with
the strike outside of court m I r
were now In progress.
Attorney Genernl Daugherty In his
statement declared there would be
no objection by the department of
Justice to meeting of union men to
perform any of their functions "that
do not interfere with interstate com
merce or otherwise violate the law."
ABRIDGING LIBERTY
"It anyone undertakes to abridge
personal liberty," hi added, 1 will
bp ns vigorous in upholding the peo
ple's rights as I am vigorous in op
posing violence "
The attorney general expressed the
belief that the strike situation would
"quiet down" this wee ;ind added
"I do not want to go any further
In these proceedings than Is neces
sary. I want to be reasonable ,i, ;
it, but not so reasonable as to let th
government and the people be tram-!
pled upon."
Tho Injunction, he add) d, "Is sit
ting very comfortable." adding that
.the department had received many
congratulatory messages on It, in
cluding many from labor people.
CLAIMS PRRS8 SUPPORT
Tho great majority of the press
about 90 per cent that portion of
, tho "respectable upstanding press '
Mr. Daugherty declared, approved the
government's course. The pross he
added, had performed "a very gener
ous, helpful service to the American
people."
i Responding to n question, the at-
I torney general said he thought a
I court would construe advocacy of
picketing; as being in violation ol
Judge Wllkcrson's temporary restrain
ing order.
Reports to the department of Jus
tice, he asserted, showed the situa
tion over the country to b( "quiet,
very comfortable."
JOHNSTON DBSFI T
As the attorney genera! discussed
the situation, William H. Johnston,
president of the International Asso
ciation of Machinists, one of the sev
en striking rail union, de, la red in ; n
address before a mass meeting of
strikers here that no Change had
been made In the methods of conduct
lng the strike. BO far as his union was
Concerned.
Mr. Johnston characterized the Chi
cago injunction as "the big i
and said ho would "defy Attori i
General Daugherty or anyone else to
interfere with me and my fellows'
meeting to discuss matters of mutual
interest."
I APPROPRIATION CONSIDERED
WASHINGTON. Sept 5.- The l s
lilattVe committee on the general staff
Tuesday considered Senator . H.
King's bill appropriating S 1,000.000 to
convert Fort Douglas Into a brigadt
Rj post. It will report later to the as re-
BODY FOUND ON
RAILWAY SIGNAL
Chicago Crime Puzzling;
Ten Implicated in Strike
Murders
CHICAGO. Sept. 6. Tho body of
an unidentified man about 45 believed
to have been a railroad worker, was
found hanging by a ropo tied to tho
ladder of a semaphore on the right
j of way of tho Baltlmoro & Ohio rail
road Tuesday Pending an examina
tion of the body by a coroner's phy
sician, tho police allowed It to hang.
TEN MEN ARRESTED.
MEMPHIS, Tenn , Sept. G Ten
men, all of whom, according to the
police, have made confessions, and all
of whom the authorities state, admit
being striking Frl9co railroad em
ployes, had been caught In tho net
opread over the city following tho
fatal shooting early Saturday morn
ing Of Charles II. I-anior, nonunion
Frisco shop employe, while ho was
on ins way to worn. i nv ituitun wi
Lanier was by mistake, as, according
to the confessions of several of the
men tinder arrest. It was their inten
tion to frighten Clarence Stevens, non
union Frisco shop foreman. Lcnler
was rldlmr In tne car with Stevens
j w hen ambushed.
I Tho alleged confessions, the police
' declare, bear on tho killing of I,anlcr,
S plot to waylay Stevens, the pulling
I of several spikes from the Frisco
, tracks near Caplevllle, Tcnn.. a few
i miles oast of tnls city on the night
, ol AugUBt DO, with tho alleged in
dention of wrecking the fast Kansas
City-Florida special and tho slaying
Of Frank Heath and Z M. Drown,
I negro employes of the Rock Island
road at Huibert, Ark.
LARGE REWARDS.
Rewards totaling between $15 000
and $L'o,000 may be paid by tho Rock
Island road In the cases of the killing
of the two negroes. At tho time of
their deaths, tho road announced
$10' ii would be paid for tho arrest
and conviction of each man connected
With the affair. In tho alleged coo
fcsslon of Beth W. Poston one of the
t l men bearing on that case, ho
Implicated between 15 and 20 men,
the police say Officials of the road
here said the rewards would be paid
If the conditions of arrest and convic
tion are carried out.
A fund of over $1000 had been
raised.
BRIDGE lY KUmSif.
SAN BERNARDINO, Cal.. Sept 6.
-A bridge on the Santa Fe railroad
near Verdemont, at the mouth of
Cajon Pass north of San Bornardino,
has been dynamited within the last
three days, aceordln-? to an announce
ment here by Santa Fe officials. Three
girders and t, conorote abutment
were damagod, the announcement
said. A repair gam,' discovered tho
damatre and reported the finding of
a piece of fine under the bridge.
vKJ
GUNS BOOM AS U. S.
SHIPS REACH BRAZIL
RIO Dl-J JANEIRO, S.pt 6 (By
the Associated Press.) (ium boomed
from the warships of eight nations
when, the U. S. S. Maryland and tho
I' s . S Nevada entered the harbor
of Rio do Janeiro Tuesday afternoon
carrying tho American mission to tho
Brazilian -centennial headed by Secre
tary of State Hughes.
Although the United States has not
recognized tho mailt government, a
gunboat flying tho main flag saluted
and tho Nevada returned the salute by
order of the secretary of state, who
told Admiral Jones that diplomatic
technicalities should be waived as
both vessels were In a friendly har
bor. .Mr Hughes is scheduled to call on
President Peaso today Tuesday he
gave B lengthy statement to the Bra
zilian press referring to the abiding
friendship between Brazil and the
I nlted States, and recalling the sit
oi Pom Perdu, II, to the Amoricau
centennial In 1S7 and the fact that
be Is returning that visit on behalf
ol President Harding.
I Find out for yourself
I how good it is
J.A.FOLGERCO. 11 YOUr
San Francisco fiFOCd I VtOll
' Kansas City - Dallas T
Shizuoka, Japan WSlIll'lt
CAMPAIGNS IN
IDAHO STARTED
Politics This Year to Rage
Hot, Leaders of Three
Parties Say
BOISE Idaho, Sept. 6. With throe
parties in the field, Idaho has for
mally opened Its 1922 political cam
paign. Opinion of party leaders In
to the effect that the campaign l
destined to be one of the hottest In
this state.
State political headquarters have
been opened In Boise by I. H. Nash,
chairman of the Republican state
committee; Will H. HornlbrooK,
chairman of the Democratic state
committee and Frank 12 Johnnessr,
chairman of tho Progressive state
committee. M Alexander, Demo
cratic candidate for governor. has
been started on the stump, Charles C.
Moore, Republican gubernatorial can
didate, is in the open asking tor sup
port and II P. Samuels, the Pro
gressive standard bearer, Is cam
paigning on the strength of the argi
ment that tho two major political
parties are unsatisfactory to the peo
ple at large and they should turn to
the third party for relief.
ALL WANT TAXES REDUCED.
The platforms that the three par
ties adopted will have some bearing
on the situation and on subsequent
developments. But all three of them
are positive and In harmony on the
paramount issue of the campaign, a
reduction In taxes and a check on tho
expenditure of public funds. Tho Ro
publlcan platform "faors amending
the laws so that the maximum levies
which the various taxing bodies may
levy shall be materially reduced and
that any additional levies within an
other maximum to bo fixed shall not
be levied unless approved by a two
thirds vote of the taxpayers affected."
The further pledge Is made of a
"close supervision of all appropria
tions to the end that Idaho's cost
of government, state county and mu
nicipal shall be reduced to actual
necessities."
The Democratic platform pledged
the party. First, "cut every appro
priation to the bone, and do It with
out Injury to any legitimate Institu
tion or Interest. Second, glvo tho
smaller taxation units to understand
that unless I hey pursue a like pol
icy, a limitation on the taxing pow
ers of these units will bo fixed by
legislative enactment Third, abolish
tiii ablnet form of government." Tho
Progressive party proposed tho abol
Ishment of th cabinet form of gov
ernment and of alleged "tax-eating
commissions."
WOULD ABOLISH STATE POLICP.
all three parties agree that the
state constabulary should be abolish
ed and that department of state gov
ernment la doom J As to the state
highway department, tho Republicans
pledge for the construction of "only
such road3 as are imperatively need
ed at lowest possible cost." The Dem
ocratic platform is for the "reorgan
ization of the state highway depart
ment In the Interest of efficiency and
economy." The Progressive plank is
for "reformation" of tho department.
CANDIDATES LISTED.
The three political tickets in the
field are as follows:
FOR GOVERNOR.
Republican C. C. Mooro of St An
thony. Democratic M. Alexander. Boise.
Progressive H. P. Samuels, Sam
uels loll LI El TENANT GOVERNOR.
Republican H. C. Baldrldgc, Par
ma. Democratic Elmer O. Thompson,
Idaho Falls.
Progressive A. B. Lucas, Jerome.
FOR SECRETARY OP STATE.
Republican Fletcher A. Jeter,
Coeur d Alene.
Democratic Ben R. Gray, Hailey.
Progressive E. A Dow. Bingham
county
EOR TREASURER.
Republican Dan F. Banks Cald
well. Democratic J. W. Tyler, Emmett.
Progressive George Plpher, Can
yon county.
EOR AUDITOR,
Republican B. J 1 . Gallctt, Poca
tello Democratic Howard Snell. Nampa.
Progressive C C. Blake, Bingham
county.
EOR ATTORNEY GENERAL.
Republican A. H. Conner, Sand
point Democratic Lester Harrison, Kel
logg. Progressive A. H. Wllkle, Bnno
vllle county
FOR MINE INSPECTOR.
Republican Stewart Campbell,
Hailey.
Democratic William Snow, Mac-
kay.
Progressive Edward Schward,
Boise.
EOR SUPERINTENDENT OE PUB
LIC INSTRUCTION.
Republican Miss Margaret Sweet,
Grangevllle.
Democratic Miss Retta Martin.
Levviston.
Progressive Miss Etta Brown,
Lewis county.
EOR CONGRESSMAN.
Republican First district, Burton
L. French; Second district, Addlsou
T. Smith, Twin Falls.
Democratic First district George
Waters, Weiser; Socond district, W
P. Whltaker, Pocatello
Progressive First district, W. W.
Deal, Nampa; Second district, Dow
Dunning. Boise.
EOR JUSTICE SUPREME COURT.
Republican William Lee, Moscow
Democratic John C Rice, Cald
well. Progressive O. E. Hall, Bannock
county.
rtrk
ENGINEER OF BOISE
CAPITOL IS KILLED
BOISE, Idaho. Sept 6 John
O'Donnell, 64, chief engineer of the
state capltol healing plant, was elec
trocuted at 6.30 o'clock Tuesday eve
ning, at his homo, when wires attach
ed to an extonBlon light became cross
ed and burned his chest, killing him
almost instantly. Mr O'Donnell had
the light running from tho house
lighting system under tho porch,
where ho was doing repair work.
Ho had been employed at the cap
ltol for about 12 years and Is survived
by his widow, two sons, ono sister,
Mrs. Rosie Rogers of Butte, Mont.,
and three daughters, living In Boise.
uu
Material for tho suspension brldgo,
420 fet long, over tho Colorado rlvor
In tho Grand Canyon, was carried 11
miles from tho railroad by pack ani
mals down steep, winding trails to
the brldgo site.
no
Queer pets of sailors of the United
States navy Include pigs, dogs, par
rots, ducks, goats and rabbits and
1 one enthusiast took an Isthmian tlgor
cub on board ihe Pennsylvania
Two Great Tire 'Values for tlie 7
Light Car Owner JBkl
V W THEN you note the prices quoted below on 30 x 32 inch- t$!mi m JKtU
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EVANST8N I
NEWS
1! v
TEACHERS MEET IN
OPENING INSITUTE
(Special Dispatch)
BVAN8TON, Wyo . Sept. 6.
Teachers' lnstltuto opened yesterday
with 71 teachers in attendance. Mrs
Katherlne Martin. stat superintend
ent. ga e n lecture on the educational
work of the state department An ex
cellent staff of Instructors Is engaged.
Including Dr. L. E Phillips of tho '
T nlvorslty of Denver. Elizabeth Mc-
, chen, of Los Angeles and Miss i
Erlokson of Salt Lake.
The Institute was entertained by a 1
piano solo, glvon by Miss Lillian Dan
iels, and tho Eanston quartet, con
sisting of John Nelson, Robert Nel- !
son. Leonard Burleigh and William I
Brown. 1
The ministers of Evanston wfll give I
an address each morning in tho fol
lowing order: Bishop Brown. Rev
Crowder, Rev. yernon, Rev Moreton
and Rev. Hardin.
A picnic in tho woods Is planned for
this evening by the teachers.
Lee Smith and wife have returned t
home after a 10-day visit in Ogdcn.
oo-
IMPEACHMENT
OF DAUGHERTY
IS DEMANDED
(Continued from Pace One)
Wllkerson constitutes a violation by
high government officials of the con
stitutional guarantees of American
freedom and of specific federal sta
tutes without precedent In the his
tory of the nation
"Soft words of Interpretation spok
en in high official quarters' after the
issuance of the Injunction cannot niter
the plain language and intent of the
document N"or can they wlp6 out
the astounding admission by the at
torney general reported in the press
th day the order was Issued that ho
would uso tho power of tho govern
ment to maintain tho crfon shop "
DAUGHKKTY EXPLAINS
WASHINGTON, Sept 6. A deter
mination to prevent Interference with
Interstate commerce but to press no
Interpretation of the injunction grant
ed the govarnment against the strik
ing railway shopmen that would
abridge personal liberties or freedom
of speech or the press was the policy
upon which the federal administra
tion was proceeding today In follow
ing up the Injunction action.
That there would be no use of the
Jnjuctlon to bridge those constitu
tional rights was stated on his return
to tho capital oy Attorney General
Daugherty. who added, however, that
freedom of speoch and freedom of
press 'does not mean" those mediums
may be used to incite riots or mur
ders "
The government concentrated Its at
tention today on tho problem of coal
distribution, particularly In the Usui
of the virtual settlement of the an
thracite tloup. Confidence that the
convention of -inthracite miners in
WHkesbarre today would quickly rfl
fy the agreement reached at Phila
delphia last Saturday was generally
expressed In official circle.
STEERS BETTER
THAN COWBOYS
"Hook 'Em Cow" Seemed
to Be Slogan at Rodeo
Tuesday
(Continued From Pace One)
ed up with a lacerated hand, but oth
erwise not hurt.
GRUEIVTX TO COWBOYS.
Persons who had an Idea that bull
dogging constituted cruelty to animals
would hae reversed their opinion yes
terday had they seen the conteata If
anything, the steers should have been
unqualifiedly charged with cruelty to
cowboys.
Each event yesterday was run off
with fewer pauses and waits than dur
ing the first day's program and et
four hours of thrills wer,- given the
spectators. Ora Bundy, ono of the I
show directors, took personal BUper-l
vision at tho chutes and handled the1
cowboys and stock so tho program was
speeded up.
Scout Malsh again successfully bull
dogged a steer from the automobile
of Colonel P. A. Dlx In front of th
grandstand and won applause. Ho
threw his animal In record time
GIRLS GOOD RIDERS,
In tho ladles' bucking contest Ruth
Wheat, who was married at the open
ing of the program. rode "Poppei
IJox" to a finish across the arena Th
horse produced some of the hardest
bucking of tho show and the crowd
showed Its admiration of the excellent
riding by loud cheers and applause
Bonnie McCarroll also made a fine
ride
Extreme age and youth were repre
sented at the program yesterday In ex
hibitions of brawn and skill W T
Fox. 55-year-old cowboy, roped a call
In record time and accomplished the
trick In front of the grandstand. Foss
Lewis, 15-year-old Cheyenno cham
pion, rode ' Kangaroo. " a wild hnrsc.
and tamed tho animal within a few
feet of tho crowd.
Steer riding with clrclngle, relav
races and a wild horse race, brought
their measure of thrill and kept the
program going at a lively rate. Clowns
again produced amusement ioi the
h Id dies
Bill Clark, riding "Fadeaway," won
first honors In the bucking contest
yesterday. Frank McCarroll captured
first place In bulldogglng. F. C
Parks won the wild horso race.
Yesterday's results follow;
Bareback riding. Buck James, first.
Bill Clark. second, Clover Strulln.
third. Calf roping. Johnnie Judd.
first, Scout .l.ti-h. second; 11 R. Sho;
well. third. Cowboys' relay raco, Doc
Sherwood, first, George Williams, sec
ond; F. R. Bolton, third.
Cowboys' bucking contest.. Bill Cfark
on horse Fade way, first, Clover Stru
lln on horse Destroying Angel, second:
Buck James on horse Steamboat Bill,
third.
Bulldogglng steers, Franlc McCar
roll. first; Scout Malsh, second Cow
girls' bucking contest, Ruth Wheat.
first; !;onn; McCarroll and
Rose Henderson, tied lor secoojfl
, I Sf-er ndlni,' Bill Clark, firlS
ver Strulln, second; Slim HlleH
Cowgirls' poDy raco, Parli WB
; firs".; Bonnie McCarroll. aecocB
tie Baker.thlrd.
Willi nor--" r;u-:. F. C ParkvB
George Williams, second-
l'nn r:i . Mai ion Jlnckley,
James Thomas, second
Lidi-s r.-l'i. racr, Nettle
won; Patls Williams, second; 9
'Hatch, third
no
HUSBAND OF SLAIN
IDAHO WOMAN HI
F: HSK. Idaho. Sept 6 A. lA
iaoss, hushand of 3Jr Ethel CmI
who died Monday afternoon at I
hospital, as u result of Injuries Tt
ed when she was struck over till
by some unknown persons eanl
1 Friday morning, was taken law
todv by th. pohce Tuesday art
Hi was arrested upon orders ofl
S. Deiona, prosecuting attorajl
is r intr held "for Investigation I
ing the outcome of the corcnenj
quest this morning.
On.- horso Oneral Custer'J
rnanche. was th.' only survivor
battle of the Little Big HoiiM
never ridden afterward and .or
ly 20 years drew a U. 8. rm
slon.
A horseless carriage was U59:
Jesuit missionary in ancient im
the machine being driven JMl
of steam playing on a mill wneB
I by gearing with one W
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