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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, September 13, 1913, 4 o'clock p.m. City Edition, Image 6

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THE OGDEN STANDARD, OGDEN, UTAH, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1913 G
CONVENTION OF
OFFICERS OF
MUTUALS
The convention of the officers of
the Y L. and Y. M M. I A. of the
Ogden stake will be held at 10 a. m.
f and at 2 p. m . tomorrow
The morning session will bo eon
Joint and -will be held In the Weber
I academy, and the afternoon sessions
j will be held in the Sixth ward meet
ing house
Excellent programs are prepared
and special mimical numbers will ba
rendered.
Members of both the Y. L. and Y
M. M. I A. general board of Salt Lake
will be in attendance.
oo
If ! FOUR GREATEST
II THOUGHTS
I BY MAN
If you were asked to name the four
'greatest thcobts that man has ever
conceived, th four statements of
fact that have meant most to hu
manly, what would you name? It
has been ar&ued from tim to time
ami the answer that is most univer
sally accepted is:
The four basic thoughts which
form tie four corner stones of the
temple of truth and liberty are. The
conception of a pure and spiritual
Ood the supreme value and equality
of rmen the equal but not identical
value and liberty of women, and the
dignity and worth of all toil and
tollers
Thesfe will be considered in a series
of evening sermons in the First
Presbyterian chm-ch, commencing to
morrow night.
oo
I I SUNDAY NIGHT
I CLUB OPENS
I OCT. 5
The meetings of the Sunday Night
club In the Guild hall of the Church
I ! of the Good Shepherd will be resum
ed this fall. The first meeting will
be held on the evening of October 6
The list of speakers in the month or
October 16 as follows:
October 5, Dr. A. A. Robinson.
October 12 Rev Ward Winter
Reese, Salt Lake City.
October 19, Dr. E G. Gowans.
October 26, Apostle David O. Mc
Kay oo
I WOODMEN OF
THE WORLD
!; Meet at our new hall. 2320 Washing
1 ton avenue, Fraternity block. Sunday.
! September 14, at 3 p. m.. to attend the
funeral of Neighbor W. S. Donaldson
Band in attendance Degree team
in uniform.
1 C E. GANSKE. C. C.
E. ADTH, Clerk
ro
111 JOS.F.SMITHJR.
I IS TO BE
J PRESENT
Eldr Joseph F Smith. Jr . of the
quorum of the twelve apostles will
meet with the high priest quorum of
the Weber stake in the Weber acade
my at 10:30 a m. He also will meet
with the general priesthood meeting
at 2 p. m.. in the Second ward instl
tute, Sunday.
II FRUIT COMPANY
I IS ORGANIZED
Yeterday afternoon the Orchard
Community Packing association filed
articles of incorporation in the coun
ty clerk's office, the parties connect
ed with the enterprise all being resi
dent of Ogden. The object of the
company Is to do a general shipping
and selling of fruits, with headquar
ter! at Ogden The capital stock
amounts to 510,000, divided into shares
of the par value of SI each.
The incorporators are J. C. Nye.
I ALWAYSTO
I PLEASEYOU
H
KVj That's our eenrUnt elm
jjwO and ambition - Goods that
3g9j please Prices that please
jjffiS Servioe that .please
KM Adjustment of all com-
njflj I plaints In a way to please.
HhK i Hence, we art called, "The
Store That Satisfies."
ISH
HI BURTS'
I
George .1. Kelly, D. H. Adams. Paul
Stecher. A. P Blgelow, B S. Taoobs,
H H. Thomas. Enoch Bingham. Frank
Peterson, Charles Cretgbaum. C. T.
Mams. Joseph Goodalo. S. .Tame
Bingham, J. P Brockbank and Joseph
Ririe.
The first officers of (he companv
are J C. Nye, president: H. H
Thompson, vice president, and Georg
Kellv, secretary, who, with Paul
Stecher, D. H. Adams, Enoch Bing
ham, and A. P Blgelow form the directorate
UCJ
TAX NOTICES IN
A BONFIRE AT
NIGHT
County Treasurer Joseph Storey
last evening sent to the posioffice an
automobile load of tax notices, there
being something more than 7000 let
ters The other notices will be mailed
rhie afternoon and Monday.
After finishing the work last eve
ning, about 24 notices to prominent
business firms were placed In a bas
ket on one of the desks in the treas
urer's office, and a "trusty'' Janitor In
cleaning up the office carried the no
tices with waste paper to the fire
bark of the court house and consigned
them to the flames
The treasurer was some mad this
morning and the worst of it is it will
require a good deal of extra work to
duplicate the notices, as the names of
the parties to whom they were ad
dressed are not known to the treas
urer's force The treasurer may send
out a number of duplicate notices, he
eays. in order to cover those de
stroyed Should this be done, Mr.
Storey says he hopes taxpayers who
receive a second notice covering the
same data will not think they are be
ing unduly Invited to pay their taxes.
oo
HOW TO NAME A
CANDIDATE
FOR QUEEN
Nomniations are now in order for
queen of the Fashion Sho-w. Else
where in the Standard is a coupon
which, when properly filled in, will
nominate a person for the honor and
give her 500 votes The coupons are
only good for nomination purposes
and no more than 5-00 votes can be
secured by means of the special nom
ination coupon Arrangements are
being made by merchants to give
coupons with merchandise, and the
votes may always be bought
The following polling places have
been named by the committee, con
sisting of E F Mlsch, Joseph Goss,
W. D. Van Dyke, Jr., and Carl Alli
son Culley Drug store. Mclntyre Drug
6tore. T H Carr drug store. Misch
pharmacy, Co-op drug store ad the
Depot drug store.
Tickets may bo purchased in most
any of the stores in lots from one to
25 at the price of one cent per ote.
The following rules govern the
contest :
"The contestant receiving the
greatest number of votes at 10 p m ,
September 23 will be adjudged queen
of the Fashion show
"The queen will select her own
maids of honor There are to be
four maids. The contestants will be
limited to the following counties
Weber, Davis, Boxelder and Morgan
"The votes will be published every
night and the results will appear in
this paper
William Anderson, the local deco
rator, Is designing and will superin
tend the construction of the queen
rloat No expense or pains will be
spared to make that float the most
magnlflcient ever exhibited in an
parade in Utah
The Fashion show committee has
arranged for the gowns for the
queen and maids As the queen fea
ture is the pride of the committee,
the gowns worn will be triumphs of
the dressmakers' art It Is probable
that the beautiful gowns will be
placed in a store window for exhibi
tion purposes
CONTRACTS OF
GRADUATION
AT ACADEMY
During the current year of the Wo
ber academy, there will be an import
ant departure from the custom of for
mer years in the matter of getting
ready for graduation. Hitherto the
question of who Is eligible has been
left till the latter part of the year, the
supposition being that the candidate
has kept In mind from the beginning
of his course all the requirements as
set forth In the annual fronfl year to
year. But serious difficulties hae in
many inttances attended this proced
ure. Students who thought them
selves eligible often found, when they
came to look up their credits, thai
they had neglected ome essential con
dition, and 6o could not graduate with
their class.
To avoid such disappointment in
the future, a contract of graduation
will be entered into on the day of
entrance with each student expecting
to get hi diploma at the close of the
year. On his part, the student mus
present a list of credits covering the
past three year' work. These will be
duly passed upon by the committee on
graduation, which will then precrlbe
the studies to be pursued during the
current year, in order to comply with
the condition of graduation.
By thi method, student who have
been irregular In their high ehqnl
work, may still become eligible to
graduate, and much misunderstanding
and many heart burning will be
avoided at the clOBe of the year.
A "handsome certificate" is prom
ised young men who enter the army
aviation service . But wouldn't a life
Insurance policy be better?
CONFERENCE OF
MUTUALS OF
A STAKE
The Y. L. & Y. M. I. A. of the North
Weber stake will mept tomorrow in
annual conference. The meetings
will be hld at the Third ward and
will commence at and 10 a. m. and
at 2 p. m
The meeting commencing at 9 a. m.
will be for consideration of the con
test work of the season. The follow
ing contest subjects will be discuss
ed The retold story.
Mixed double quartette. .
Orations.
Junior boys' chorus.
Junior girls' chorus.
At the 10 o clock session there will
be addre.-ses in the oune men's
meetings upon the following topics,
which will also b dl6CU6sed by the
mutual workers.
How to get ion per cent efficiency
out of stake and ward officers.
Something new for the junior class
es. The Y. M. M. I A. hand book
The afternoon session wil be taken
up with addresses and discissions on
the following subjects:
Enrollment.
Inning the boy
Developing the boy
In their meetings the young ladles
will consider the subjects
Music, ward officers problems, civ
ic pride, studies for 1918-1914 and
testimony meotlnes
Several member? of the general
boards of both organizations will be
present to discuss the coming win
ter's work with the workers in con
vention. oo
DIPHTHERIA AND
CHRISTIAN
SCIENCE
Editor The Standard Dear Sir: In
your Issue of the Sth Instant. I notice
a cable report from London of the
trial of Benjamin Jewell following his
child's death, while under Christian
Science treatment. Inasmuch as thc
wording of the report is misleading
to your readers, will you kindly grant
me space for a few words by way of
correction?
The facts In this case are as fol
lows: The Jewells had two children The
younger, a boy. came home from (
school unwell. On application at the
school the mother learned that theYp
was a mild epidemic of measles anr1
of coldB. The symptoms were de
scribed to her and they agreed with
those shown by the boy The boy
was treated by a Christian Selena
practitioner and ntlrly healed Al
most immediately the girl sickened lo
the same way The disease ran IV.
natural course At the end of the first
few dnyB the child was so much bet
ter that the parents made prepar.
tion9 to take her to the seashore hav
ing engaged apartments, whilst at tne
same time the treatment was stopped.
No anxiety whatever was caused until
the day of the death. On that daj
the child afp something which dia
agreed with her Violent vomiting en
sued and 9he expired immediately ol
svneope. As the child died without
the attendance of a registered men
leal practitioner an autopsy and In
quest followed. The Inquest offered
no explanation of the death other than
that alread given, but a bactenolo;,
leal examination of the throat ga.
evidence of diphtheric germs When
the case came before the coroner, tin
doctor who made the autopsy and th(
bacteriologist were called. The doc
tor who made the autopsy declined to
say that the child died of diphtheria
or that death was accelerated Th"
bacteriologist could onh 6ay that diph
theric germs were present In the pari
examined but that did not aecessartly
mean that the child had suffered from
diphtheria.
At the coroner's inquest the dot loi
who made the autops wa6 asked it
the death had been accelerated by
r ant of medical treatment and his an
wer as reported In the Yorkshire
(Eng.) Evening Post, was. "It is dlt
ftcult to say S'es' or No." about thic
My meaning is that the child with
diphtheria if treated by modern med
ical methods would be very likely ti
recover Being a healthy child, o'
would have thought with the use b
anti-toxin it would have recovered
am not to be regarded as saying tha:
if the child had had medical treatment
it would hae been alive today."
As a matter of fact, the doctors 11
this case were utterly unable to di
agnose the disease and It Is no fce
cret that even a correct diagnosis, Ij
made, la of no avail unless a remed
can be found and applied In view ol
the difference of medical opinion
wblch exists as to the reputed remed;
al value of anti-toxin and other se
rums, it is hardly right for a news
paper or even a coroner's jury to re
gard such remedy as infallible
If a single failure of this kind,
charging as it doe6 failure of Chri6ti
an Science to heal. Is considered of
sufficient importance to warrant t
porting from England, what is to h
said concerning the hundreds and per
haps thousands of deathB occurrlnc
each day throughout the world whci;
are undoubtedly medical allures ant!
which cause no comment?
It should be remembered that Chris
tlan Scientists adhere to their religl
ous belief and depend in their hour ol
need upon their understanding of God
and man's relation to Him through
no sense of fanaticism but because
they have as a rule tried botbjjnedi
cine and Christian Science and thert
intelligent judgment based upon ex
perience prompts them to relj entirely
upon the latter for healing disease as
well as sin.
With many thanks for your courto
s- in this matter,
Respectfully vours,
(Signed) WARWICK H TAYLOR
Christian Science Committee on Pub
licatlon for State of Utah.
uu
MONTE CARLO PRINCE.
Chicago, 8ept. 13. Prince Albert ot
Monaco spent an hour In Chicago to
day on his way from New York to
Wyoming, where he plans to engage
in a bunting trip.
HIS MARRIAGE
DAY IS NOW
POSTPONED
Because John Statler, the young
man charged with disturbing the peace
had lost his job in the Southern Pa
cific shops as a result of his quarrel
witn John Sharp, and also because
Sharp was a ' good fellow" and bore
no malice. Judge W H. Reedcr this
morning gave the defendant a sua
ponded sentence Sharp was in
court with a banriagd head and Stat
ic had a scratched nose and a
bruised eye Both declared that the
were pven In tho matter of pokes
Outside of the two participant In
the alleged f lsrht, there were no valu
able witnesses. The evidence of the
two, however, did not differ In man
particulars According to the testi
mony, Statler and Sharp had a slight
quarrel the day before, because Stat
ler had "kidded" Sharp when the lat
ter declared h was making 42 cents
an hour During that unpleasantness.
Statler had been scratched on the
nose by a diamond ring which wound
ed him. when Sharp struck.
Yesterday. It was charged, Statler
went out of his department and struck
Sharp while the latter was working at
a machine. The result of the blow
was to put Sharp in the railroad hos
pital for the time being. Statler also
lost his job and was arrested Sharp
said he had not complained and did
not know his opponent was jailed un
til he had left the hospital.
Statler proed to be quite an ora
tor He said he had come to Og
den from Altoona. Pa., and after work
ing here aw hile had met a young lad.
Desiring to be married, he had loft his
old Job to work in the shops where
the wages were better. He was cast
down over the loss of his position as
it means a postponement of the mar
riage.
Society
DANCING PARTY.
One of the mo9t charming alfairs
ever held at the Hermitage in Ogden
canyon was the dancing part glen
bj Mr and Mrs Ralph Everist Bris
tol, and Mis Armstrong on Friday
evening, September 12. in honor of
Miss Margaret Spargo and Mr lames
Collins, and Mis.- Ethel Harmon and
Mr. Paul Tyler who are to be mar
rled in the early fall
The dance hall, refreshment room,
porches and other portions of the
house were beautifully decorated In
a color scheme of green and gold,
the effects being obtained by the use
of pine boughs, with sun flowers and
sage blossoms.
The part- was well attended by the
younger 6et, the guests Including the
relatives of the bridal couple?, and
most of their young friends.
Receiving.
Mr and Mrs Bristol, Mrs. Arm
strong, Miss Armstrong, Miss Spargo
Mr Collins. Miss Harmon, Mr. Tv
ler. Serving
Ruth Douglas. Kathrvn Joyce. Mar
lon Eccles, Florence Wright, Ixphel
ia Runvon. Leila Rich Edna Watt!?.
Ruth Watti? Viola Carr. Vivian Car
roll June Seowcroft., Ellen Scow
croft. Ogden Guests
Mrs. James Spargo Mr and Mrs D
H. Peer, Mr and Mrs. John Spargo.
Mr and Mrs. Lewis Peerv, Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Peery, Mr and Mrs R.n
mond O'Donnell, Mr and Mrs. Fred
Ballif, Mr and Mrs Mariner Brown
ing. Misses Margaret Spargo, Ethel
Harmon. Pamela Spargo. Daisy Kuhn.
Verna Tavey Edna Towne, Lucile
Tavey, Beverly Riley, Mina Tavlor
Celia Eccles, Ellen Wright, lberta
Wright, Rae Wright. Lillian Wright
Fawn Wright, Loretta Whalen, Vera
Browning, Dorothy Browning Lila
Eccles, Mildred Douglas, Beatrice
Brewer. Helen Towne. Helen Perkins,
GHadys Rich Margaret Finne. Finne.
Rae Keck Florence Maginnls, Flor
ence Bonn, Elsie Forrest. Kathnn
Hoag. Minnie Klesel, Myra Grout.
Kathryn Fitzgerald
Messrs Dr Walter Whalen, Luke
Wright, Kenneth Griffin, Raymond
Treseder. Dr. E. DumUe, Ed Maurer
Eugene Carr, Henr Volker, Dee Plni
gree. Joseph Eccles Roal E:cles,
Dan Roberts, Roscoe G. Gwilliam.
Lawrence Dee Hays Watson. Jack
Heywood Jack Kuhn E Whitlock,
Joseph scowcroft, Jr. Orson Douclas
Raymond Faegons, Eher Piers. Har
mon Peer, Wm. orn Clarence
Wright, Wheelen. Earl Harris, Earl
Wattle, Weiland Gllson, Anthon..
Fitzgerald. Royal Griffin.
Out-of-Town Guests.
Dr Edward Roberts, Pocatello, Ida..
Paul Tyler, Tucker, Utah, Bron
Swan, Rochester. N Y Mr. and Mrs
W R Kimball. Chicago, 111.; Mr and
Mrs F. S Mills Los Angeles. Cal ;
Mrs. J H. Hammon Kansas City.
Mo., Mrs. Emmet Fulkerson. Chicago,
ill Mr. and Mrs. Ted Littlelield,
Tucker. Utah. Mrs Pearl Reagan.
Baker City, Utah.
Salt Lake City.
Misses Mignon Denhalter, Jacket
ta McCune, Mary Lehman. Marjone
Dey, Eliza Dev. Georgia Young, Lu
cile FYancke. Nora Warhurton. Mar
ion Hooper, Margaret Dunn, Alberta
Bradley, LaVerne Fulton Margaret
Andrews, Florence Sullivan.
Messrs. Jas. Collins, Julian Bam
berger. Walker Cheesman, Douglas
Swan. Harold Peck. Wm. Lewis, Tom
O'Brien. Mary Murphy Jerome Wil
liams. Thos Giles, fcbbol Maginnls.
C. Louis Collins. G. R Vearsly, Em
mett Annis, Joseph Crisman George
Crieman. Sam Mclntyre, Jr, Morris
Andrews, George Bradley, Melvln
N'aylor. Forter, Burt Williams, Alon
zo Romnev. Vern Samuels
Mr. and Mrs. Rur-sell Tracey. Mr
and Mrs. Jas. Lers Mrs Anna Col
lins. Mr. and Mrs Ed P. Kimball
Miss Florence Campbell
Brlgham City.
Mr and Mrs Harold Dav. Mrs Mln
ogue. Emmett Watson, Paul Pierce.
Provo
Mr Merle Taylor. Mr. Ralph Jones.
Mr. Dave Schwab. Miss Eva Jones
HOME INDUSTRY CIRCLE.
Mrs J. H Bishop very cbarmingly
entertained the Home Industry club
at her home, 21M Washington aven
ue. Frldav afternoon Sunflowers
and asters were very effectively used
in the decorations throughout tne
bouse An elaborate luncheon was I
served in the dining room.
Thoe who enjoved the hospitality
of Mrs Bishop were:
Mr-sdamos Carver, srdir. Nihol
a. Roll, lack Evan. Snedakor Coop,
B; bee, Tom Evans, Hlnehcllff. Wil
cox, Freeland. West and Daniels
Miss Ellon Thomas has returned
from a trip through the east. During
her absence she took advanced Btud
les with Chicago's famous vocal teach
er, Madam Ancella M. Fox, also a
course at the national summer school
PARCEL SHOWER.
A parcel shower In which members
of the Fraternal Brotherhood ot Og
den with two or more outside friends
will participate will be glen Monday
evening next nt the horn1 of Miss Myr
tie Hoover, 2215 Lincoln avenue, ic
compliment to Miss Marie Hartog and
Miss Pearl Peek, who will be married
early in the week to R. N. Young and
Richard O. Tucker, respectively.
Miss Hartog and Miss Pek are well
known young ladies of Ogdon and
host of warm friends join In congratu
lations and In happ merry and fa
cetious forecasts of their future.
COZZENS-HANCOCK
Miss Mary Lucille Cozzons. former
h of Montpelier. Idaho, and Heber C.
Hancock of Ogden were united in mar
riage Wednesday. September 1", in
the Salt Lake temple.
TO ENTERTAIN.
Miss Edna Towne and Miss Verua
Taey will entertain this evening at
the home of Mlgs Tavey In compli
ment to Miss Spargo and Miss Har
mon and on Wednesday next Mr
Philip Warren Knisely will entertain
for the bridal at a beautifully tea at
the Virginia.
FOR BRIDES-TOBE,
Miss Daisy Kuhn entertained infor
mally for Miss Spargo and Miss Har
mon and their bridesmaids at the We
ber club Wednesday afternoon
A delightful social hour was spent
at the luncheon and pretty favors
were given the gueats of honor.
LUNCHEON.
A prettily appointed luncheon wa3
given by Miss Loretta Whalen on
Monday at the Weber club in honor
of Miss Margaret Spargo and Ml93
Ethel Harmon and their bridesmaids
The color scheme in ping and green
was nicely carried out and the per
fectly served menu together with the
happy social hour made the occasion
a memorable one
HALL FRONK
The engagement of Miss Gladys
Hall and Dev. e Fronk of West We
ber has been announced The wed
ding to take place in the near future
KRUITMOES-KOP.
Jacob Kop and Miss Annie Kruii
moes. daughter of Mrs Ella Krult
moes, were married in the Salt Lake
temple Wednesdav. September 10. and
an at home at their cottage on Eu
clid avenue
A happy welcome was given them
on their return by a party of well
wishing friends
HILL-MEYERS.
George W Mers and Miss Mabel
Hill were among the September cou
pies married in the early part of the
w eek
Squire Coop who has been spendlna
a period of recuperation at the Her
mitage with his sister, Mrs Jarmau
following a period of serious illness
at a hospital in New York, is now
muh Improved and will be at his
studio next Tuesdav afternoon
(Continued on Page Seven.)
DEATHS ANDFUNERALS
DONALDSON Funeral services for
William S. Donaldson w ill be held at 4
o'clock Sunday afternoon In the SirT
ward meeting house with Bishop O M
Sanderson officiating The Woodmen
of the World will attend the services
and conduct the services at the grave
i-'ri'nds mav view.- the body tomorrow
from 1 a. m. to 3 p m
COLLINS Funeral services for Os
car C Collins were held yesterda In
the Se ond ward meeting house with
Bishop Robert MrQuarri officiating
Music was rendered by Mrs. Bernlc ie
Brown Erickson and George Bain Th
speakers were W. T. Stilwell, N A
Tanner and Bishop McQuarrle The
Interment was in Ogden City cenie
tery.
HERRICK Funeral services for
Iva E. Herrick, the 17 months
old daughter of Mr and Mrs W W
Herrick will be held Sunday, at 4:80
p. m . In the Third ward meeting
house with W D. VanDyke official
ing. The remains may be viewed at
157 Twenty-third street until 4 o'clock
Sunday.
oo
CHURCHES
First Baptist Church On Grant
Rev. H. D. Zimmerman, pastor Bible
school at 10 o'clock: 11 15. morning
worship. By special request of the
National Reform association the ad
dress of the morning will be on "The
Bible in the Public Schools'' 7, B "i
U., topic. 'Christian Culture Day."
Leader Nellie Dunsmore; 8, evening
service, subject. "Happy or Unhappy
Christians. Which''" On Wednesday
.it'ternoon the Ladles Kensington wPl
meet for the first meeting of the fall
md winter, at the home of Mrs. S P
Brooks, No. 2204 Graut avenue A
large representation of the women of
the church Is expected Monday eve
ning the young people will be enter
talned at the home of Mrs. Lorancc
Mrs. Ward will render the special mu
sic at the morning service.
Church of the Good Shepherd
( Episcopal.) 24th St and Grant Ave
William W. Fleetwood, rector. Hoiy
Communion, 8 a. m . Sunday school.
B 45 a m ; morning prayer, 11 a m , I
sermon by the Rt. Rev F S Spald
;ng, D. D., bishop of Utah. Music by
sted choir A R White, leader and
iololst.
First Presbyterian Church John
Edward Carver, pastor Morning
worship at 11, theme "The Master-r-lece
of the Master" Sunday school
at 12 15. Young People's meeting 7.
Evening worship at 8, theme: "The
Direct and indirect Results of a
Day's Work."
Central Park Presbyterian Corner
Aashington and Thirty-first. Rev. Ar
ihur F. Wlttenberger, minister. Bible
GOOD ADVICE
v-t From The
4 NATIONAL
itffilfo Make your selection for your j
7' yW!a new Fall Suit, Coat or Dress .
'Clll now , while our assortment is J
ffi!i y Then you will not be disap-
rtKfp''"V Poined if you haven't all the
Spy cash to pay down.
lihffjf Pay a deposit down and we
TwIfflL: ' av e s away for
I ifflRr ' you uni yu ca or thern
ffffgl "s way you secure tne
BwMl garment you desire ,or come
KfilfflLesz and let us explain our sys- I
ltEA, em nuvm Clothes on
Z Credit
Suits, from $10.00 to 60.00
Coats, from 7.50 to S50.00
Dresses, from $7.00 to $35.00
LADIES MILLINERY
Monday, 50 Hats, all the latest styles, values
to $7.00; your cjioice $4.95
MEN SUITh 3SRP25?sQTolwEiTI2l
Men's Suits, Hats, Shoes anc WtJi
Furnishings 1 lTXP ' '"""-fl
CASH OR CREDIT Harry Reinshnber, Mgr.
"Ogden's Most Liberal Credit House."
1 nan wmiji i m . . - .
school, 10 a. m.. preaching servioe. 11
a. m ; preachlnp service. 8 p. m .
Christian Endeavor. 7 15 p ra
First Congregational Church
Frank G. Brainrd minister Miss Al
ice Gray, pianist. 11 o'clock, morning
sprnrnn Miss Dorothy McGaw wilt
sing. S o'clock, evening sermon, the
Young l adles chorus will sing: 12 i.
Sunday school. 7 p m. Christian En
deavor meeting.
First M. E. Church 10 a. m., Sun
day school; 11 a m . preaching, theim3
"Apostolic Evangelism; Miss Ra
mey will sing, 6:30 p. m. Epworth
league; whistling solo by Miss Addic
Kouse, Instrumental trio by the Sho
nians; ocal solo, Miss Laird; 7 : 3'J
p m.. preaching service; theme. "In
dT the Rainbow" Miss Laird will
sing. Tuesday, 2.3U. Women's M'.b
iionary meeting, church hasenion: ;
lection of officers. Thursday
Ladles Aid society meets at the hom;
of Mrs Peterson 606 23rd St
First Church of Christ Scientist
Masonic Temple, Washington avpnu..
Sunday school, 9.45 a. m . sermoD,
11 a m subject. 'Substance '
Ellm Swedish Lutheran Church
Corner Jefferson avenue and 2.1rd St.
Erik Floreen. pastor 10 a. m. Bible
s hool; 8pm, English services
nn
VIOLATE LABOR LAW
Belllngham. Sept 11' The Pacific-!
American fisheries company, the lar
gest salmon cannery concern on the
coast, pleaded guilty today to thirt;
cases -f violation of the child labor
law and a total fine and costs of ?s '.'
was paid More than thirty more
cases filed against the company wpre
dropped, as It was shown that in
thesp caseB the children had obtained
permits to work.
oo
Colonel Wattedson says President
Wilson is a "still, strong man in a'
blatant land " But, seeing its' Marse'
Henry, well have to forgive him
TWO DIVORCES
FOR UNHAPPY
WIVES I
Florence Freeman and Alice Hart
have filed a petition in the district
court asking to be divorced from
their husbands, Walter Freeman and
Edward Hart Thev also ask lor the
custody of twc. minor children each,
costfl of suit r.nd attorney fees, rea- J
sonuMe alimony and a division of the 1
communitv property.
Mrs Freeman in he-.- petition re- J
Mates that she married the defendant
August !fl 1896, and thai for some
time past the defendant has been un
kind and cruel and has failed to pro
vide the necessities of llf
Mrs. Hart complains that Mr. Hart
has been cruel and that he has or
dered her away from the home, eject
ing her from tlv premises September
11 of this year. She says that he
drinks heavily and is cross about the
home and calls her had names at
times, accusing her of infidelity She
married the defendant July 25, 19QJ
and they have two children.
on
TOO LATE 10 CLASSIFY I
THREE rooms, pantry. Bhanty, water j.
and lights. Slu. 3228 Monroe. l.
0-13 lwk
BROWN hand satchel between MST
tress factory and mouth of Canyon,
containlne brush, fly book, etc Osvner
call at Standard office and receive
same by paying for this ad. j
9-13-lwk
f OGDEN THEATEr1 jj
THE jj
j Commencing I
TOMORROW (SUNDAY) NIGHT
j With matinee Wednesday and Saturday. The most power- I
jl ful play of modern life ever staged jjfj
'The Lion and the Mouse" A
II Regular house prices 10c, 20c, 30c. Matinee seats 10c, 20c. I '
II Box office open dally from 10:00 a. m. to 9 p. m Phone 220
Next Attraction ! j
U "HIS LAST DOLLAR." jjk jl
School Supplies I
Complete assortment at special prices i
BRAMWELL BOOK & STATIONERY
2362 Washington Avenue jj

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