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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, June 20, 1914, 4 P.M. City Edition, Image 12

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I 12
I The most economical of
all quick-leavening agents
SIGNED STATEMENT
ISSUED DY THE
COUNTY BOARD
i The following statement to thp ta-
pnprs of thp Hnoprr and KriPSillP
H districts was issued by the commls
j pionprs this morning:
H "As there aoem to be a question
H in the minds of the taxpayers of the
H Hooper and Kanesville road district
H in regard to T lie attitude of the board
H nf county ommlssionen with refer
H nnre to road building In these dis
H tricts, we have deemed it advisable
to make the following public state
I ment. that all Who read may under
stand and be governed accordingly at
H the coming (pedal road tax election
to he held July 1014
"It was the intention of the board;
H tn begin road building in those dis-1
fl tricts several months ago. but there I
H being no direct railroad line from tli j
H rock crusher to those districts BOine
fl de'n was necessary in obtaining
H 'ransportation for the rock and owing
H to the stormy weather bad roads and
other justifiable reasons, we have
H been unable to get started as planned
1 But now those ''iff ultlea have been
overcome and the work we are now
doing at Pleasant View being nearly
completed we again promise you that i
we wil! be down In those districts n
a ver short time and spend the ba)
pnee of the 1913 special road tax and'
hruld you again vote a tax at tho;
rohling election, will remain tberp un '
til we have spent that also, which will
rvenn the spending of abou' $10,000
in those twl districts and the building
of about three ni'les of good macadam
road (Signed i Wm C. Hunter. Coun
ty Commissioner. "
I GATHERING OF THE
SCOTTISH CLANS AT !
LAGOON, JUNE 23RD
Most elaborate Scottish event winch
has ever taken place in the state.
Highland Spoils Highland Dancing.
Scottish music and song. aluable
caah prizes. Train leaves 11 a m
and every hour thereafter. Fare Inr
this occasion, L'5 cents round trip
Advertisement
on
SUMMER COURSE OF
M. 1. 1. OF ONE OF
TIE STAKES
The summer course of the Mutual
Improvement associations of the
North Weber stake ha6 been fully
arranged and the meetings will begin
next Sunday night. In district No
1 the circuit work, similar to that
which was conducted last summer,
will occupy two Sunday night meet
ings a month, the first and third
;This district is comprised of the Og-
; den Third ward Tenth ward. Mar
riott, Lynne, Wilson and Harrisville
In the second district, the M I A
. will have charge of all the Sunday
night meetings. The first one will
be the regular monthly conjoint BOS
sion of the tun organizations. The
j second will be for circuit work, the
J third for n lecture night and lh
' fourth for the circuit again.
Next Sunday night will be a lec-
I ture night and the meetings will be
as follows:
Plain City, President James Wotli
erspoon; West Weber. Wells Mcln
tyre. Farr West, President .1 V.
ninth ; Taylor, W. Z Terry. Warren,
Joseph H. Williams,; Slatervllle, W.
C. Hunter
notice"
The city cemetery gates will be
closed against vehicles at 8:30 p tn
each evening and open nt 7 a. in. until
further notice. Advertisement
rrt
MM KILLED IN
CANADIAN MINE
Lethbridge Alberta. June 19 A ter j
rific explosion coming without warn
lug, today entombed L'.'n miners em
ployed In mine No. 20 of the Hill
crest Colleries. Ltd Of the fift
rescued onh fourteen were living to
night Despite efforts of the two
score mine experts laboring amid th
poisonous gases and debris hope of
rescuing alive the 200 men yet in
the mine is waning The effects
of the disaster were:
Men in mine when explosion oc
curred. .600, of whom 350 escaped
Number rescued, 60, of whom 36
died later
Miners slill entombed. 200 prob
ably killed by fire which followed the
explosion
At dusk a sibnt group of wives
and mothers stood at the mouth of
Hie mine, which had been closed by
the explosion, still hopeful thai res
i uos would be made
The explo-ion which occurred about!
M o'clock this morning shook the
countryside for miles, lifted the
roofs from many miners" cabins and
demolished numerous small build
ings. A moment aftM iIk' explosion
a score of panic-stricken surface
workers rushed from the mine, fol
lowed by a dense cloud of smoke and
poisonous fumes
ppeals for help were dispatched
to many towns, and in the meantime
residents organized an emergency
crew and turned feeble and Ineffei
tive bands toward the work of res
cue When the first rescue crew arrived
this afternoon a large force of men
rfet about to clear the shaft Thou
sands of tons of rock have fallen
into the mine and It Is feared that
the men. even had they escaped
death from the poisonous fumes, prob
ably were crushed to death by the
falling debris
No information as to what caused
the explosion has ben obtained, but
it is believed it was due to the form
ing of gases.
oo
A Californian Is the inventor o a
machine into which a person in search
of employment can drop a coin and
get a card, visible from outside the
machine, telllnc where work may be
found and what kind.
iSBSBalliBWis
THE OGDEN STANDARD. OGDEN, UTAH. SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1914.
LOOPED. MIL 10
ARMY WOl AFTER
UTAH FARMERS
The Logan Journal says Dr Titus
of the T'tah Agricultural college has
been called to Sevier county by trie
farmers of that section who report
that the lucern looper is destroying
whole fields of hay He loft LOgail
Wednesday. Out at fireen river it '
reported that the looper has climbed
the trees and is eating thp leaves and
small fruit
Box Elder county has it-, attention
divided hetween that pest and at
least three others. The weevil is
doing considerable damage, the army
worm has destroyed acres ami acres
of beets, uhlle tho apple leaf roller
! is out after its share of attention
STEAMER GOES DOWN
IN THE MISSISSIPPI
St. Louis. June 20. One hour after
putting ashore nearly 1000 telephone
girls at lton, III . the excursion
steamer Majestic 01 Peoria. Ill . carry
ing a crew of thirty-seven, sank in the
Mississippi river just north of here
at 1:30 o'clock this morning a few
minutes after running into the new
intake tower of the St Louis water
works now under cnstructlon
St Louis and all neliiiborinc towns
on the Illinois and Missouri sides of
the rie,- were thrown into excitement
by early reports that the steamer had
gone down with all the girls aboard.
Ambulances were rushed to the scene
along both sides of the river, but there
were no available vessels to carry the
wnuld-be rescuers and newspaper men
to the scene of the accident.
The men on shore for a few minuies
after the collision heard faint calls
Later a dim light in midstream show
ed what appeared to be a few men
clinging to the rigging of the boat
which protruded out of the water.
DEADLOCK MAY
YET BEBROKEN
Mexico City, June 19 The opinion
prevails in well informed circles that
Pedro Lascuram. who was Mexican
foreign minister during the adminis
tration of the late President Bffadero,
is again to be appointed foreign min
ister It is renorted thai Lascurain at first
refused to accept the post, but was
later persuaded by friends to do so.
Washington. June 10. Hope that
the wavering mediation programme
still might bring peace to Mexico, was
expressed here late tonight by Argen
tine Minister Naon as he took the
train tor Niagara Falls after confer
ences with President Wilson and Sec
retarv Bryan and Luis Cabrera of the
Washington agencj of the constitution
alists
Neither Mr Naon nor am of those
with whom he bad conferred would
sa whether any new plan had been
devised to break the Seemingly final
deadlock a I Niagara Falls between the
American and Mexican delegates
Position Unchengcd.
In official quarters, however, it was
made known that there had been no
change In the position of the I'nited
States government, as set forth in the
declaration yesterda by the American
delegates that only a constitutionalist
could be accepted to head the proposed
provisional government in Mexico City
After the conference with the presi
dent and Secretary Bryan, Minister
Naon stated that there still was en
couragemcnt for mediation and Secre
tary Bryan reiterated his declaration
that mediation v. as progressing satis
factorily. No official word came from
the president.
Whpn Mr Naon left his first confer
ence with Secretary Bryan he was
asked if there was still hope for medi
ation "I always look toward the light.' he
said "I never look toward the dark "
"What If the light Is put out?" was
suggested.
"I never could grope in the dark,"
was Mr. Naon'e reply
Neither Secretary Bryan nor Mr.
Naon would admit there had been a
consultation with a representative of
the constitutionalists. When a repre
sentative of the Associated Press who
had seen Mr Cabrera enter the Ar
gentlne legation asked the latter about
his visit. Mr Cabrera expressed
amazement.
"But you do not deny that you were
there?" was asked
"Certainly I deny it."
But ou were seen."
"But can I not still insist that I
wag not there?" Mr Cabrera replied.
Seeks Conference.
After the departure of Mr. Naon,
Secretary Bryan sought a conference
with one of the legal representatives
of Caranza in Washington. But as it
was late the secretary of state failed
to find the lawyer In his office. It
was learned latr that one of the ob
jects of Mr. Naon's visit was to induce
the constitutionalist leaders to waive
temporarily their objection to the con
sideration of the internal affairs In
Mexico by the mediation conference.
He is said to have suggested that If
the constltutlonn llsi s would agree to
a provisional government to succeed
Huerta that the mediatorv powers and
the linted States would aid in set
tling the internal conflbt.
After all 'he conferences of the dav
' and nieht had ended, however, there
I were no oficlal communications and
the Washington government was de
Clared to stand on its position as out
lined in the statement Issued yester
day at Niagara Falls
In the licht of this, ( was believed
here tho fate of mediation still rest
ed with the Huerta delegates at Niag
ara Falls Should they stand on their
public statement issued Wednesday It I
was felt 'hat mediation would fail
no
W. R. Skeen & R. H. Baumunk,
Lawyers, Suite 412 Eccles Bid.
I Advertisement
TRAGEDY IN A
BOSTONRESORT
Boston, lune 19 Police Inspector
; Thomas F Norton was shot fatallj
today in a sensational reolver bat
tle while attempting to arrest Law
' reuce Robinson, who is wanted In
Grand Rapids. Mich , on charges of
' murder anil robbery. Robinson was
I taken to a hospital, suffering from
three bullet wounds. He probably
will recover. His companion, Joseph
F Daniels was locked up on a
charge of murder. The inspector died
soon after reaching the hospital The
shooting occurred In a crowded base
j ment restaurant
Private detectives who had trailed
Robinson enlisted the aid of Norton
and two plain clothes officers En
tering the cafe they found him sit-
ting at a table with Daniels
When the police inspector placed
his hand on Bohinson's arm. a shot,
I said to have been fired bv Robinson,
struck Norton in the abdomen
Leaping over the body Robinson
darted for the stairway leading up to
the street, Three shots from the of
ficers' weapons struck him as he
i reached the steps Although .severe
ly wounded, he emptied his olver
in the direction of the detectives and
r ached the street, where a mounted
policeman overpowered him.
: Inside the cafe, meanwhile, the de
I teethes had grappled with Daniels
, and had arrested him Throughout
the shooting. while diners sought
j shelter behind overturned chairs and
I tables, a oung woman pianist made
la brave effort to play a popular air
Grand Rapids. Mich., June 19.
Lawrence P. ("Chippy") Robinson is
j wanted In Grand Rapids in connection
I with the robbery of the Thomson
1 jewelry store last September, in
which three men were shot and kill
ed by two robbers, who escaped with
about $2200 worth of diamonds.
Walter Lawrence, arrested in Cov
ington, Ky., three months ago, Is be
ing held here to answer to the same
charge. The police allege Lawrence
and Robinson were In Grand Rapids
together when the jewelry store was
robbed.
Rewards totaling $7500 have been
offered for the arrest and conviction
of the murderers.
THE LEADING MEN.
' This land lies well," said the visi
tor. "Yes. but you ought to hear the
real estate agents," said the victim
Livingston Lance
Read the Classified Ads. I
SENSATIONS IN THE!
HILLSTROM MURDER j
CASE IN IN
Salt Lake June 20. Sensation af
ter sensation plied up yesterday In
the Joseph Hillstrom murder trial
before Judge M. L. Ritchie In the
district court.
Hillstrom discharged his own at
torneys, F. B. Scott and E. D. Mc
Dougall. in open court, declaring they
were In league with the district at
torney and that he could conduct his
own defense better than they He
re-engaged them In the afternoon,
and Soren X. Chrlstensen also was
entered as associate counsel, repre
senting Judge Hilton of Denver, the
famous labor advocate
Two women entered the cane yes
terday, each shrouded In mystery,
which counsel for the defense could
not or would not clear up.
One is Mrs. Virginia Snow Ste
phen who is prominent in education
al, social and art circles. Mrs. Ste
phen, who is a daughter of the late
President Lorenzo Snow of the Mor
mon church, has long been connected
with the art department of the Uni
versity of Utah, and stands exception
ally high as an instructor. Mrs Ste
phen, it Is said, has never seen Hill
strom. but has become so firmly con
vinced of his innocence that she will
endeavor, while taking her vacation
In the east to raise funds for his
defense
Convinced of Innocence
' The man who wrote the songs
and composed the music that Joseph
Hillstrom has, simply could not be
guilty of so brutal a murder as the
I killing of the Morrisons." Mrs Ste
j phens told F B. Scott, of the de
I fense, before she left for the east.
Dis ussing the Interest that Mrs.
Stephen has displayed In the case.
Mr Scott said yesterday:
.Mrs Stephen came to my office
some time ago and talked to me
about the Hillstrom case. I did not
j know her until she introduced her
I self but she seemed greatly inter
ested in Hillstrom s defense She
said 6he had never seen Hillstrom
but that she could not beliee the
i man guilt v from what she had read
and heard of the case She ap
peared eager to render any assist
ance in her power She told me that
she was going east for her vacation
and that she intended raising funds,
if possible, while absent lo assist
Hillstrom in getting his case prop
erly before the courts At that
time, 1 might add. we did not know
that Hillstrom would be called for
trial at so earlv a date.
"Mrs. Stephen also asked me if I
would like to have assistance in the
case and I told her I would. Hav
ing been Informed that she Intended
stopping in Denver, on her way to
the ea.t I suggested lhat she might
see Judge O. N Hilton, the noted
labor advocate in Denver who was
associated with me In the Sorensen
case That she saw Judge Hilton is
evidenced by the telegram which
came to Soren X Chrlstensen today."
Attorney O. N Hilton, when inter
Mewed in Denver last night regard
ing the connection of Mrs. Virginia
Stephen with the Hillstrom murder
case, said.
"I know nothing of Mrs Stephena
further than that she stated to me
that she represented .he defense
committee of the I W. W. She
was anxious, she said, to see that
'Hillstrom secured U3tlC0j and In case
he was convicted bv a Jury In the
present trial she wanted to be as
sured that he would secure a new
trial and, If necessary, carry the case
to the highest court. I was unable,
by reason of other duties, to repre
sent Hillstrom. and recommended At
torney Soren X. Christensen of Salt
lake. who Is now conducting Hill
strom e defense."
oo
DECISION IN FREIGHT
RATE CASE DELAYED
Washington, June 19. The Inter
state commerce commission's decision
in the eastern advance rate case will
not be announced tomorrow as had
been expected in some quarters, and
the Indications today were that it
would not he made public for several I
days at least. Some of those best
informed on the commission's pro-1
cedure would not be surprised if it
I 1 Refined Entertainment At Maxim's Cafe
A DELIGHTFUL ENTERTAINMENT AMID PLEASANT SURROUNDINGS, IN THE NEATEST AND COOLEST
CAFE IN UTAH 2Mfi ?! lTJT Z t
WfM cares. Come to the comfort care. ,cr
I 1 MAXIM'S Under the Marion Hotel F. C. Blankenship, Manager
I
THE FILTHY, I
DIRTY, DISEASE
BREEDING FLY
ff you found a fly in your soup you would not
eat it.
But what about the fly which crawls all over
your meat before you buy it?
If you knew it, you would not eat that either,
but you don't know.
You are safe only when you purchase U. S.
Inspected Meats.
The Fly has no access to them It cannot carry the filth,
dirt, disease and bacteria from the mire and corruption
of it's haunts into our U. S. Inspected Meats; because
they are thoroughly protected by being completely
wrapped in knitted white cotton bags, protecting them
against flies and dirt from the time they leave our plant
until delivered at the markets.
v
This feature of our method of delivery is in line with M
the cleanliness and sanitation existing throughout our I
entire establishment. By noting the contrast between
! our neat, clean and sanitary manner of handling our
meats and the way the uninspected kind of meats are ex
posed to the flies and dirt of the streets, you will have
somewhat of an idea of the differences in sanitary con
ditions between Government Inspected Plants and unin
spected Slaughter Houses.
You are vitally interested in this propanganda; it is be
ing done for YOUR PROTECTION. You may easily
learn whether your market is handling meats that are
properly protected, by stepping down town some morn
ing early and watch the meats delivered to your dealer.
Or Still better, call us up and we shall cheerfully tell
you.
FOR YOUR OWN PROTECTION PURCHASE
YOUR MEATS AT MARKETS WHO HANDLE
U. S. INSPECTED MEATS EXCLUSIVELY.
WATCH FtiR THE U. S. INSPECTION
STAMP ON ALL YOUR MEATS. i
OGDEN PACKING &
PROVISION CO.
Wholesalers of meats that are sound, whole
some, clean and free from disease.
I were not announced for at least two
weeks.
oo
NOTICE
KINDLY RETURN:
The party who carried away a cap
vasslns-sample, case from the count
er of "Munsej, Mayflower Cipar
Store.' at corner of Hudson and L'5th
Will kindly return same to the store,
or C'reston hotel, no question will be
asked. The most alue of same con
sisted in the collection of photo !
graphs and pictures for use by the!
owner. To save trouble to the party j
who took this sample case its prompt
return will stop further proceedings'
for his arrest (Advertisement)
oo
DELEGATES ARRIVING
FOR BIG CONVENTION
Houston, Tex.. June 1!). Houston
s preparing to entertain the Interna
tional Association of Rotar tlubs
and hundreds or delegates 'including
those of l tah; are expected to arrive
Saturday afternoon. A few delegates
iMimrf ASSES' XiMZSSi !
bas proTPn Catarrh t. incurnoip. -ScIcdco I
' nnd thereto" uirt. ?""tat,0"l ttCMW, j
tn dotes from 10 dZ ' . " tlkr" UraaUj i
directly on til ffig ' Poonful. It acta
the '-rJJ d s mjrf.ce, of
I Bras ",u vxss-issK: a !
-1 T.. H.ir. nil, nu. for MM. j
have already reached the city, amons
the most prominent being chesley R
'Perry of Chicago, international secre
tary and Thomas H. Stephenson of
Edinburgh, Scotland An elaborate ,
program of entertainment has been
prepared, and prominent Housronlan;
liaveleft th city to meet special
trains at St Louis. New Orleans and
other points to escort the delegation
to Houston Following the comple
tion of the local program, a swing
arpund the state in special trains
is planned.
I ONE ATE FOUR 9E f
, WHAT FOUR ?
j GUESS.
FANS REPAIRED
Motors Re-wound.
Work Guaranteed.
Electric Service Co.
Phone 88. 425 24th Si
This Is a Live Town.
ADVERTISE HERE
and Get Busy! l

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