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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, July 29, 1914, 4 P.M. City Edition, Image 6

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TUp nnnCN STANDARD. OGDEN UTAH WEDNESDAY. JULY in 4. - . '1
I AT Tl GREAT AGE
OF 103 YEARS
I H udge J A Bagley received word
H Oil morning that his father had died
M In Lincoln. Neb., last Thursday at
ol the age of 103 years.
3k An account of the death gPf J
m the Lincoln News of July 23, as fol
J 10 Horace Bailey, oldest resident
tji 1 incoln in point of age, died at a
. m locl Thursday morning at the home
of his daughter. Mrs. James Steven
I Ml SOU. 639 S0Uth EleVeth,St,S?r o"hJ
- tl Mr Bagley lived till September .
m would have been 103 J?" old. Dee
kj was due to old age. He ' g
suffering, passing away as if falling
; vM asleep. . . , or,
Jll For nearlv twentj years he has been
hlind and almost totally deaf and these
N3B afflictions have been a great cross to
' one of his energetic temperament
Wk Though confined to his home for many
M rears he has never been 111 and his
fa appetite has been unlformally good.
. I Horace Bagley came of sturdy New
' 1M England stock and was boru in er-
M moot. He claimed that his extremely
m long life was due to abstemious bab-
M its He was a moderate eater, neve, ,
m drank intoxicants and used very little
& tobacco He was ret fond of broad
I iM and milk and never ate anything else
-W for his evening meal.
?M He is survived by three daughters
Mjm and two sons. They are Mrs. Tames
.'M tenon and Mrs. Joseph Johnson or
jfl Lincoln Mrs. L. A. Clark of British
Co'um'jia. Judie J. B, Bagley of
B Ogdei.. I'tah, and Horace N. Bagley of
3iB Snokane. Wash.
;, XM Ho-ace Bagley was accounted a man
'. ' of great bus'nes3 ability and at one
- lm tini? Tvai' a man r ,arse wealth- In
y4H an earL aa' he settled near McGregor.
tfsm la., and owned large tracts of valua.de
il9 laEf1- He was one of the bis armer3
Vm oi that section of the state and lhed
l Sn one of the most beautiful homes in
"$B. Iowa.
I I tfll Horace Baglev was a son of one of
I the early Plymouth settlers who later
Jl moved to Vermont where Horace was
I M born in 1811. At the age of twentj-
" -jl one the son went to .-Mobile. Ma .
'"m where he engaged in the mercantile
business and laid the foundat;on for a
:sT large fortune. He was opposed to
J slavery and because of his pronounced
views "on the subject left the south and ;
J came north. Mr. Bagley wa3 advised
I U to settle in Illinois which was then a
s'ate of great romise. While in 1111
-tm no's p waB 'nauced ,0 attend a lot
U sa.e where the city of Burlington. la.,
IS1 is now located Lts were selling as!
EM low as $3 a lot but pessimists whom
jjfl the prospective investor met expressed
ifll the opinion that the place would never
W amount to much because It wa? too
Hi far west and Mr. Bagley did not in j
mm vest. He afterwards found that Iowa
j was one of the l6t and richest states
7w In the union.
M He cast his first vote for "Old Hick-
ory ' Andrew Jackson In when!
jw he was just twenty -one yeari old. He i
ffl was first a whig !n politics bin when
.3 the Republican party was organized he
3i became an ardent follower of Abraham j
J Lincoln When in the mood, he was
'j able to give a very interesting account
4j of the exciting campaign when Jack-
J son was elected to the presidency
$9 nearly eighty years ago He talked
Mexican war of 1S4G. He was deeply
interested In the political and military
history of the United States and HkeJ
nothing better than to discuss the
various wars which the country en
gaged In from the time of sVashlngton
to the present day He was an en
thusiastie admirer of Theodore Roose
velt 8nd lamented when Teddy spoke
In Lincoln, that he was unable to hear
him discuss the political issues of the
day He has been a resident of Lin
coln for three years. Since his dis
ability Mr, Bagley has lhed around
among hlB children.
I See J. Kerrigan in "At
Mexico's Mercy," and "The
Perils of Pauline' at the Og
den tonight. Advertisement.
I mm FINE PAID
BY A SALT LAKER
In response to a telephone commu
nication from Deputy Sheriff J, L.
ABOUT AUGUST 1ST
we move to larger quarters
I at 2425 Washington.
'TIL WE GO
countless wonderful bar
gains such as $15 to $35
' suits at $10.75 and $16.75.
Get Yours, Men!
Buchmitter & Rowers
" Drwsers f Merv
41 WAW11NCTN AVIMUS
ONE GOOD MEAL
deserves another. Every
meal we serve is good so
when you eat one here
you'll surely want another.
THE PALACE CAFE
mm 176 25th St.
HobiOU, to the effect that a warrant
had been issued for his arrest on the
charge of speeding in Ogden canyon,
in an automobile. C W. Fleck or Salt
Lake sent a letter to Judge W. W
Reeder vesterday. The commumca
Hon contained a check for $15. which
thp writer explained was to pay a his
- fine for the offense
He also said thai he noticed that
the Judge had fined several other men
for a like offense and commented that
the fines were frell deserved and he
hoped other 'speeders would be
treated likewise.
"A Letter from Home,' at
the Isis tonight, and the big
orchestra. Advertisement.
HOUS DISEASES
CURED BY MENIAL
PROCESS
Rev Thomas Parker Boyd of San
Francisco, who will deliver the ser
mon at the Church of the Good Shep
herd next Sunday morning, will give
a series of lectures during the week
at the parish house, His subject w!l
be the Emmanuel movement.
Dr Boyd has been practicing psy-cho-theraputy
for the past twenty
years. Unlike many healers, he does
not fear that others should learn the
method by which he cures diseases.
On the contrary he says In hit. "How
and Why of the Enmanuel Move
ment: '
"I am anxious that all the sensible
people who can be induced to lesrn
it ran; do so. and find the royal road
to health, to peace, to contentment
and success
In his lectures. Dr. Boyd will ex
plain how many diseases, especially
those of a nervous nature arise from
mental and spiritual causes, and caa
be successfully cured only by mental
and spiritual methods.
-oo
SMALLPOX COMES
FBOM OTDED PLACES
City Sanitary Inspector r.eorgt
Shorten reported today that, with the
release of the only smallpox patient
in the city up to yesterday, two more
cases were placed under quarantine
The one released was Moroni Sher
wood. 345 Dan street, and the new
ones were Isabel Hornsby. L'43 Wash
ington aenue. and Mrs. Ballantyne.
284 Twenty seventh street Miss
HornBby came from Salt Lake where
she contracted the disease, and Mrs
Ballantyne has been visiting in Mor
gan and was exposed there
MEETING OF THE
CITY BOARD
Th.s morning the city board of
commissioners approved the tax list
and plats for sidewalk district No.
' 124 on Hudson avenue, between
Twenty third and Twenty-fourth; No.
j 12-6 on Nan Buren between Twent
I Bixth and Twenty seventh and curb
I and gutter No 112, on Van Buren.
between Twenty-sixth and Twenty
seventh streets
The recorder w as authorized to pub
lish the time for the meeting of the
board of equalization which will be
gin July 30 and continue five days.
Miscellaneous claims in the sum of
; $20 and refund claims recommended
I by the city engineer in the sum of
$240 were allowed and the auditor
I instructed to draw warrants for the
I amounts.
oo
j Fifth series of "Million Dol
I lar Mystery," at Orpheum to
I night. Advertisement.
I rr '
; PACKAGES MISLAID
! IN THE LOBBY OE
One of the causes of complaints
received at the local poBtoffice on
account of mistakes made in the
handling of mail, which are wrongful
ly charged to the civil service, was
brought to light this morning, through
the finding of a package addressed to
a local business house, on one of the
writing desks In the lobby of the
postoffice, by a representative or The
Standard.
! The package was taken into the of-
fice of the postmaster and delivered
to Assistant Postmaster Rufus Qar
ner After expressing due apprecia
tion, Mr. Garner said that It was no
uncommon thing to find letters er
packages on the desks In the
and nr-nn c Inn n 1 1 in ..fca
baskets. The parties to whom letters
are addressed or their representa
tives, he said, often get the mall from
the private boxes and in order to
look for a parcel notice, will plact
it on the desk. In this way a letter
Is often overlooked when the party
leaves the lobby. Complaints then
come into the office to the effect that
a certain letter, which had been ex
pected, was uot received and in some
instances has caused considerable
trouble to the clerks through an in
vestigatlon by a postoffice inspector
In this regard, Mr. Stevenson, chle
clerk in the postmaster's office, re
called the finding of a valuable ' reg
istered letter, addressed to a local
bank in the lobby, which would have
caused the government employee eon
dderable trouble had it been found
bv some unscruDuloua person.
iGlASTFCOUBT
AND COLORED MAN
ORDERED TO PAY
Ed Douglass and John Anderson
were tried this morning In the munic
ipal court on charges of drunkenness.
In the hearing of the case, it was
learned that both men were guilty
and in addition to being drunk they
bad engaged in a fight Douglaas
was proven to have been the aggres
Bor and for this reason the judge
fined him $15, while Anderson got off
with a five-day suspended sentence.
Ernest Hays appeared before the lo
cal bar of Justice for the first time,
according to his Btateroent. in four
vears. He pleaded guilty to a charg
of drunkenness and as he had injured
no one but himself he was given a
five-dav suspended sentence.
John' Doe. who was charged with
a similar offense, appeared to be wnal
is known In modern parlance as a
"horrible example." He bad lost
one shoe and his hat and stated that
he was drunk through "habit. He
was "broke" and his clothes barely
hung together In telling his story,
he said that he had graduated from
aD academlr course in the University
of Minnesota, but his love for drink
had brought him to his present level
He obtained a livelihood, he said, at
present bv washing dishes in restaur
ants He waa asked by the Judgo
w hen his last money was earned and
he said this' week and that he had $3
yesterday. instead of buying him
self some shoes or clothes, ho spent
the monev for liquor and landed in
Jail After giving him a lecture, the
judge suspended sentence.
John Dalley and Irving Hensler
were charged with petit larceny The
former pleaded guilty and the latter
nor guilty. In telling his story. Da
ley said that he slept in the Montana
rooming house Monday night and
when he left Tuesday morning he
stole the electric clock that was found
in his possession when he and Hens
ler were arrested He was endeav
oring to sell the clock when he me'
Hensler and a few minutes later they
were taken Into custody He also
6aid that Hensler did not know a
thing about the theft of the clock
After telling the story, he was sen-
, ,i-vn tan A ;, v i in t h P Clt
ICIII CU IU 1 ' c J
Jail and, on motion or Acting Assist
ant City Attorney Wade Johnson, the
case against Hensler was dismissed
William Clark, a negro, pleaded
guilty to the charge of keeping a dog
without a license He stated that
he had been unable to pay the license,
but paid SI on it several days ago.
The complaining officer, R S Tay
lor, stated that he had been to the
defendant a home 35 times since last
March t0 ollect the license money.
The defendant, he said had kept
promising to pay the money, but had
never "come through" and it wai:
finallv deemed necessary to bring him
into court. The judge then gae a
lecture on the danger of fooling with
the law by postponing obedience Lo
It and sentenced Clark to pay a fine
of $6 the minimum fine in such ca
Be8anc pave him two days to pay
the other $J in the license.
Ellen Swanson forfeited $50 bail.
She was arrested last night at 2468
Grant avenue, on the charge of sell
Ing llquo- without a license
In the case of the City s F.
Morgan. Attorney W. W. Harcombe
I filed a formal request for a change
of venue, on behalf of the defendant.
Th. request was granted and the
place and time of trial will be sot
later
Adolph Anderson was arraigned on
the charge of assault to do great bod
ily harm The complaint alleges An
derson struck Alphonse Roborts on
the head with a club at Burch Creek
on July 19. 1914 After hearing the
complaint read, the defendant was
ghen time to consult with an attor
ney, and the date for his preliminary
hearing will be 6et later. He was re
leased on Ivis own recognizance on
recommendation of the county attor
ney.
C. J Fleck forfeited $15 ball on the
charge of speeding
oo
Fifth series of "Million Dol-
lar Mystery," at Orpheum to
! night. Advertisement.
oo
CHIEE CLERKS CIVEN
IN INCREASE BY
GOVERNMENT
W. F. Bangasser, chief clerk of the
railway mall service, with headquar
ters in Ogden was one of the fortun
ate ones to come under the recent act
of congress, through which all of the
chief clerks in the service received an
increase in wages.
The clerks will now receive $2100
a year The act was passed after an
investigation by the postal authori
ties, which revealed the fact that the
responsibility carried by the chief
clerks was almost on a par with that
of the district superintendents.
Mr. Bangasser has bowed to the
will of the national law-makers with
good grace and is still speaking to hU
friendB.
uu
SOPHIE CLUTTS
Have you met Misb Clutts? She se
cured a position as waitress at Snak
vllle and made a great hit with the
cowboy boarders, creating a great rj
varly for her attentions. She i9 at
the Globe today and tomorrow, in
one of the biggest hits the Eeaanay
compaiiv ever put on It ig Just one
long laugh lasting fifteen minutes
without a rest The Lubin Feature
showing at the Globe Is excellent. The
Isis presents some excellent blograph
comedy full of action and a drama of
unuBual merit. "A Letter From
Home," in two reels. Muile is the
best in Ogden. Changefe in both
houses every Sunday, Tuesday ajul
Friday Advertisement.
M WORK ON THE ,
STREETS OF TOE
CITY
Contractor Q A Heman placed a
large steam concrete mUer on s. Si
avenue between Twenty-fourth and
Twenty-fifth streets, this morning, to
supply concrete for the gutter and
base for the paving on the west side
of the avenue. Mr. Heman also ha? a
force of men and teams at wofk
grad'ng Twenty-fifth street In the i
cinltv of Harrison avenue.
This morning the J P. O Nelll Con
structlon company began laying bind
er on the south side of Twenty-fifth
street, at the intersection of Wash
ington avenue and it is said by the
contractor that the paving of Twenty
fifth street from Washington to Hir
rison avenues, will be completed at
the earliest possible time The north
side of Twenty-fourth street, between
Washington and Grant avenues. Is
ready for the binder and topping that
section will be surfaced within
6hort time.
The new sfupply of asphalt was re
ceived vesterday and It Is said to be
satisfactory to the city and the con
tractor Speaking of the defect in
the shipment of asphalt of some time
ago. Manager O'Neill stated this
morning that the test made ly the
city corresponded exactly with that
of the companv shipping the asphalt
but tint the Inferiority of the ma
terial was not easy to detect by a
rhemiieal teat
NO DOVE SHOOTING IN
OTAH AS THE LAW
PROHIBITS
I
A number of Ogden's pot shooters
have inquired lately as to whether
there will be a shooting season for
mourning doves There are more
doves now than in many years past
lOe llUUtrlH i iitlLU uiuci ourtico iu
the western country have a dove
shooting season and that they think
such 6hooting should be permlt'ed in
Utah in the month of August, imme
diately after which the birds move
south
Speaking of the matter this morn
ing, Fred Chambers, 6tate fish and
game commissioner, stated that there
could be no shooting season for
doves, as the state law prohibits It
He says there are numerous doves
throughout the state, but that he is
powerless to give permission to shoor
them, In the face of the law.
oo
CITY DEFEATED IN A
TAK SUIT OVER
HUDSON AVENOE
-
In a decision sustain'iig a demurrer ,
to the defendant's answer in the case ,
of Edgar Jones and others against
Wallace Foulger. city treasurer, anu
Ogden City, Judge Nathan J Harris
stateB that the city 'gave no notice
of Intention to levy a tax on the
plaintiffs' property and that the at
inomAv sa xtn atu A9 oi jdutai
authority and illegal."
The suit was instituted to have
cancelled a certain tax ley made by
the city on the plaintiffs' property
for the opening of Hudson enue,
between Twenty-fourth and Twenty
fifth streets, and also to get an order
restraining the city treasurer from
collecting the tax.
The court ruled that the answer to
the complaint entered in court by the
city did not state facts sufficient to
constitute a defense The city con
tended that the tax had been levied
after due notice of intention had been
published
THE SECOND EPISODE
! "The Perils of auline' will be shown
( in three thrllMug reels at the Ogden
tonight. A startling climax Is shown
In the last part in the destruction of
an aeroplane, the death of the pilot,
and the heroines escape from certain
death. The photography throughout
Is most excellent, and the plot clean
and wholesome at the same time be
ing intensely thrllin?. The "Ring and
the Man." a Famous Player produc
tlon will be the offering for Thurs
day, Friday and Saturday -r-Ad ertise
menf. no
MODERN WOODMEN OF
AMERICA OUTING
Indications today are that a large
crowd of merry-makers will join the
big excursion "of the Modern Wood
men of America, Camp No. 9990. to
I-agoon tomorrow. At that time, the
annual log-rolling and picnic of this
popular order will be held and thp
committee, which comprises Charles
M. Ramey, J. R. Hinchcliff and J. H
8hafer, has been successful in com
pleting arrangements for a number
of special attractions.
Lagoon, always popular, was never
ao delightful as this season. The
number of regular attractions has
been Increased and the cool and
beautiful grounds and picnic pavilion
make one of the most ideal spots for
a family outing to be found any
where. There will be all kinds of sport
I ON SALE AT 1
I A GREAT REDUCTION. g
25c to 45c French Ginghams, 17 15c
30c Mercerized Ginghams
35c Ratines
S5c to 90c Ratines
75c Ratines 71 e
, 20c to 25c Lawns and Dotted Swisses 'ff
$1.25 to $3 Parasols 'C
$1.25 to $2.50 Soiled Shirt Waists c ,
m $1.25 to $1.50 Shirt Waists Jc ,
1 175 TAILORED SHIRT WAISTS AT HALF PRICE.
1 125 PAIRS OF MODART CORSETS AT HALF PRICE. 1
I ALL SPRING SUITS AT LESS THAN HALF PRICE. I
ALL SUMMER DRESSES, Children's Gingham Dresses and Ladies'
Summer Skirts, Silk Underskirts and Kimonos at COST (
$1.25 to $1.50 Night Gowns, Combination Suits, Corset Covers and
I Underskirts I
250 LADIES' WHITE UNDERSKIRTS, SLIGHTLY SOILED AT
HALF PRICE 1
1 SAMPLE BLANKETS, IN WOOL, WOOL AND COTTON, I
1 AND COTTON; SOME SLIGHTLY SOILED, AT A I
I GREAT REDUCTION, I
Our Entire Stock of Ladies' Neckwear, 1
A Hover Lace and trimmings at
Manufacturers' Cost
60c and 75c Ladies' Lace Hose 19c
35c Children's Lace Hose 15c '
75c Lace Insertion, per yard 15c
60c Lace Insertion, per yard 10c
1 HUNDREDS OF PIECES OF ODD AND END SUMMER i
I UNDERWEAR FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILDREN 1
1 AT HALF PRICE.
1 Pump and Oxford Sale 1
$3.50 Patent Button Oxfords $1.98
$3 and $3.50 Tan Button Oxfords $1.98
$3 and $3.50 Gunmetal Oxfords $1.98
AH $3.50 Dull and Patent Colonial Pumps $2.68
$3.50 Dull and Patent Pumps $2.68 4
AH Cousin's $5.00 Pumps $4.19
AH Cousin's $4.50 Pumps $3 48
1 ALL CHILDREN'S PUMPS AND OXFORDS AT 1
1 REDUCED PRICES. I
1 HUNDREDS OF DOZENS OF PILLOW SLIPS, BED I
I SPREADS. SHEETS AT A GREAT REDUCTION. 1
I Last & Thomas 1
and diversion tomorrow with a social
and dance in the evening. A number
who cannot get away early in the
morning to participate in me run ua
of'amusement will send their families
to the resort early for a day's pic
nicing and join them In the evening
According to the committeemen in
I charge of the outing, no effort has
been spared to make this annual
event more successful and pleasurable
than anv that have gone before
I
NEW YORK ONLY
STRONG MARKET
American Stock Exchange
Only One in World to
Vk 0. II.
Kemam stame.
New York. July 29. The New York
Stock exchange was almost the only
security market In the world to show
Btrength and stability today. While
London and Paris were discouraging
trading and many other foreign ex
changes were entirely closed because
of 'demoralized conditions resulting
from the Austro-Servian war, this
market not only continued to absorb
further heavy offerings from across
the water, but put tho short interest
to rout as well.
The opening here was not caloula
t'-'d to arouse enthusiasm, important
shares declining from 2 to 5 points
After the initial outburst of selling,
the movement abruptly changed
largely as a result of what seemed to
be substantial buying by conservative
investors, attracted by the low range
of prices Before the end of the
first hour all losses were retrieved
with numerous material gains, which
were added to In the course of the
early session.
Recessiona at Midday.
There were some recessions at mid
day on announcement of more gold
exports, together with a resultant ad
vance In call money to 6 per cent
Declines were soon regained hdwfev.
er antl In the final hour highest pri
ces were registered.
Another sharp advance was report
ed In the rate gold shipments asked
by marine insurance companies The
rate yesterday was $1250 for ' each
million dollars shipped. Todav it
Has advanced to $5000 with a slightly
ZZl ' 6h,pments n American
Money.
New York. July 29.-Close-Mer-cant.le
paper B6 1-2 per cent; ster
ling, unsettled; 60 davs, $4 88 de
rnana, w.ys4 95 Commercial bills,
n .V 5?T. 52 l-2c- Mexican
dollars. 40c. Government bonds, firm-
. railroad bonds, irregular.
Call money, strong, 3 l-25 per
cent: rulme rafp R nor nont .
33 1-2 per cent. Time loans, strong,
rates, nominal; R0 days, 5 per cent.
90 days, 5rt? 5 1-2 per cent, six months
5 1-2 per cent. '
NORTH WEBER STAKE 1
OUTING ON TUESDAY I
Next Tuesday will be North Weber
stake day at the Hermitage, when
an outing will be given under the
auspices of the Mutual Improvement
association stake boards
The program will Include a series
of field and track sports and games
'b"oi nuvviiy con
tests. The outing will dose with
dance In the Hermitage hall ln the
evening.
OGDEN SHOE REPAIRING FACTORY
the busiest shop in Ogden. We will take care of your lf
soles, and do it very reasonable and on shortest notice (&
Give Us a Trial.
Respectfully,
OSCAR RINDERMAN.

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