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The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, July 31, 1914, 4 P.M. City Edition, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1914-07-31/ed-1/seq-8/

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J jhE OGDEN STANDARD. OCDEN. UTAH. FRIDAY. JULY 31. 1914.
8
I
I Round Trip jshhj
I SUMMER MR
' EXCURSIONS W
! --VIA--
UNION PACIFIC
I FROM OGDEN
New York, via Standard Lines $86.00
I New York, via Differential lines. .$83.00
I ' Boston, via Standard Lines $86.00
Boston, via Differential Lines $82.50
Chicago $56.50 Memphis $59.85
Colorado Springs. $22.50 St. Paul $53.50
Denver $22.50 Omaha $40.00
I Kansas City $40.00 St. Louis $51.20 i
Proportionate Rates to Other Points.
I s
Dates of Sale :
I August 5, 12, 19, 26.
! September 2, 16.
Long Limits Liberal Stopovers Diverse Routes.
CITY TICKET OFFICE
2514 Washington Ave.
W. H. CHEVERS, PHONE PAUL L. EEEMER,
General Agent. 2500 City Pass A Tkt. Agent.
BOOKING OFFICE IMPORTANT STEAMSHIP LINES.
I For That Tired Feeling
I BEEF, IRON AND
I WINE I
II
I y A tonic for old and young.
I 75c the bottle.
I I Tyf cBRIDE !
I I 1V1 Drug Co.
I I 'THE HOUSE OF
I I 1 QUALITY"
I 1 2463 Wash. Ave.
tm 9 i i i i
imrm DOLLAR
PI OR TWO
Im SAVED '
Weekly isn't much at the
start, but keep it up for one
year, and you'll have quite
I a sum to your credit.
Fortunes have had their
start from such savings
isn't it time for you to be
gin) Four per cent interest
allowed.
i
1 Ogden Savings Bank
Ogden. Utah.
M. S. Browning. President
L. R. Eccles, Vice-President.
John Watson, Vice-President.
Chas. H. Barton, Cashier.
Don't You Want to Meet Her?
Before a woman shopping goes.
She reads the ads all through,
j But you will never see her face
I nless she reads yours, too.
CITY COUNCIL ASSISTS.
Brigham City, July 30 The City
council granted the Peach day com
mittee free use of the city for Peach
day. This has been the custom In
the past, and it affords the promoters
of the big celebration an opportunity
of handling all concessions without
the usual formalities of procuring li
( enses.
COFFEE EXCHANGE CLOSES.
New York. July 31 -The coffee ex
change decided to close- until Monday.
M Pull nliL See our stock of premiums. You 'LI a
L resllre It ;m to uve Lljrt M Coupoaj K
M tod Tigs. LrlleJ ipecUlly larlted. B
Fa Hemenway & Moser Cigar Co. JL I
W 2403 WuWh At,., O.dta, Hub O
BANK
OF OGDEN, UTAH. i
IU. S. DEPOSITARY.
Capital $150,000.00
Surplus and Undivid
ed Profits 250.000 00
Deposits $3,000,000.00 I
M. S. Browning, President.
John Watson, Vice-President. B
L. R. Eccles, Vice-President.
R B. Porter, Vice-President. '
Walter J. Beatle, Cashier.
Jas. F. Burton, Asst. Cashier. I
WHEN THE "PINCH"
COMES
be certain that your Banking Credit
is established with the
UTAH NATIONAL BANK
OF OGDEN
I Southeast Corner Washington Ave
nue and Twenty-fourth Ctreet.
I
An old substantial growing Institu
I tion, managed by officers with
years of Banking experience.
GOVERNOR SPRY TALKS
OH THE AUTO ROAD
THROUGH UTAH .
i i
The Tribune says:
Straight rroni the shoulder. Gover
nor William Spry yesterday answered
his critics on the threatened loss oi
the Lincoln highway.
To twelve members of the Kmar
club who called on him to seek W
co-operation in having the route
around the south end of the lake open
ed he pledged his support In thai
movement and declared that a state
merit that he was responsible for ug
don's apparent victory was made d
either fool, or knave knave It n
understood the facts and fool if he
did not understand them. " I WOUW
Ike to tell him that to his face, the
governor added.
Reminded bv the committee inai
Ogden had broken a gentlemen s
agreement to cease working for a
northern route in return for bait
Lake s abandonment of the project 16
have the route from Evanston to bait
Lake come by way, of Chalk creek
and Parley! canyon, the governor
said it would be an easy thing to have
the latter route declared the official
-tate highway if Ogden persisted in
repudiating the agreement. He inti
mated that he would be willing to
recommend such action to the stat.
road commission if necessary to pre
I vent Salt Lake being shut out en
! tirelv
The governor declared that the Lin
coin highway project, so far bs its
$10 000,000 finances is concerned is
a lot of hot air and a myth, con
cocted by the automobile interests to
sell their cars
He explained that the route around
the northern end of the lake, over
which Ogden Is diverting the trans
continental traffic at present, to the
elimination of Salt Lake, was declar
ed a state blghwa In connection with
the Midland trail project when it was
generally supposed that the mam
transcontinental road would extend
from Grand Junction to Salt Lake,
north to Ogden and around the lake
The money spent in improving that
road, he said, was appropriated by
the legislature at the urgent request
of the autolsts of the state and could
not be spent in any other way.
"If there is any criticism due In
this matter It belongs to the autolsts
oi the state and particularly to those
of Salt Lake, who laid awake nights
getting that appropriation through
the governor declared with consider
able warmth.
The Rotarlans laid before the gov
ernor the charge that Ogden had brok
en raitn with Salt Lake in the matter
of the Lincoln highway The Ogden
. q had agreed to drop the northern
route around the lake if Salt Lake
would abandon Its effort to have tn
rhalk creek and Parley's canyon
route officiallv declared, they alleged
Agreement Admitted.
The governor admitted that such
an agreement had been made by the
Ogden men to himself when the route
v as declared down Weber canyon to
Ogden and thence south to Salt Lake.
"If they have broken that agree
ment, and apparently thev hae, then
there is but one thing to do, and
that Is to declare the official highwa
down Chalk creek and Parley's can-
on cutting Ogden out entirely," said
the governor.
Will G Farrell, one of the delega
1 tion, handed the governor a pimphlet
; gotten out by the Ogdn interests in
j connection with a Nevada association,
which he declared to be absolute
proof that Ogden had repudiated ano
broken its pledge
"I used to turn a deaf ear to the
stories of Ogden? antagonism when I
W3s secretary of the Commercial
club," he said "I was for brotherly
I love and all that but brotherly love
will lose us the transcontinental auto
traffic in this case "
The governor suggested that the
' Ogden people be given notice that
, unless they keep the pledge the route
will be declared down t naik creeK.
The Rotarlans insisted that such
! notice was not due them; that they
I had deliberately broken faith with
I Salt Lake and that Salt Lake should
no longer consider the Junction City.
Suggestion Is Made.
F C Schramm suggested that the
building of a road from the mouth ot
I eber canyon to Farmlngton to con-
nect there with the present state road
! nughl solve the difficult) Tourists
could then make heir choice at the
mouth of the canyon between Ogden
and Salt Lake This suggestion was
hailed as a good one.
Tt was generally agreed that the
route around the south end of the
lake must be put into condition for
traffic before the city can hope to
J If is only a Question ol time until I
you will wear
j Scowcroff s
I Ncvcr-Rip Overalls
j WHY NOT START RIGHT NOW?
Ask the man who already wears them. He will tell you
I he never knew there could be such a difference in
OVERALLS
f MADE IN OGDEN UNION MADE
I JOHN SC0WCR0FT & SONS CO., Manufacturers
meet Ogden on equal ground The
governor explained that the southern
route was officially declared a state
highway last September by the stato
road commission and that the money
was available to put It into good con
ditlon except for a dispute between
Grantsville and Tooele as to which
way the road would run through
Tooele county
Members of Committee.
The Rotarlans who called on the
governor were F. O. Schramm, VA C
Orem. Will G. Farrell, W F Jensen,
president of the Commercial club; L
M Bailey, George O. Relf W. F. Ad-1
ams. Dr W L Ellerbcck, N H Ber
tram, F S Murphy. Fred Hornung
and Roderick McKenzle
Mr Orem opened the conference
bv explaining the purpose of the
meeting He said that Ogden had
secured the highway nrouud the north
ern end of the lake, because that
route had been improved by the state,
while the southern route had had
nothing done for It. He said the Ro
tary club desired the aid of the gov
ernor in its attempts to have the
southern route put Into a position to
vie with the northern route
The governor then made a lengthy
statement, telling the whole hlston
of the Lincoln highway project, so far
as he had been connected with It officially
01. T. B. BEfiTTY GIVES
OGDEN A SON
SPANKING
In an address before a mas6 meet
ing of Ogden citizens, held at the We
ber club yesterday afternoon. Dr. T
R. Beattv, secretary of the state board
of health, stated that sanitary and
health conditions in Ogden were de
plorable. This became known to
him. he said, through a thorough
study of the local situation and he
was not surprised that it was true
when he learned that the city health
department was carrying on Us wor
with a $5000 a year allowance The
j fact that the police department, he
said, was allowed $40,000 a year to
j look after the safety of the public.
I while the health department, with
I its much more Important duty the
! guarding of the public health was
j only allowed $5000 was a very bad
j condition.
With ?4'i,iiun a year, ' he contin
ued. "I could make Ogden the most
sanitarv and healthful city in the Uni
ted States."
In speaking of the city sanitary de
partment, Dr Beatty stated that a
city the size of Ogden that had only
I two men in the sanitary inspector's
, office and one of them being required
j to do clerical work, while the other
j went out, appeared to him as nn an
j tedeluvian condition For proper
health conditions, he said, me deparl
1 ment should have at least four com
i petent sanitary inspectors, a clerk, a
, pitj physician, v. ho could give all his
time to the work of the department
and several nurses for duty in all
parts of the city to educate mother
on the proper care of infants.
The necessity for having nurses
connected with the health department
may bp known when the statistic
show that 22 out of every 100 bable
born in Utah, die before they reach
I the age of 1 year The causes o
1 infantile mortality are largely prc
; ventable diseases and the mothers
should be taught hov. to fight them.
Dr. Beatty noticed, he said, in the
?.utomoDile riae about tne city wun
Messrs J. M Kirkham. George Shor
ten and J. D Larson that' the Ogden
roads were far ahead of those in Salt
Lake, but that sanitary conditions
were bad The worst condition that
was noticed was that there was no
garbage system in the city and that
the garbage which had accumulated
in many back yards and vacant lots
was the breeding place of flies, filth
and disease He had learned also
that there were hundreds of houses
in the sewer districts that were not
connected with the sewers though
there was a city ordinance making
this compulsory
The cause of these bad conditions
not alone in Ogden. but in other clt
ies, is largely prejudice and ignor
ance, but the different communities
are beginning to realize the need of
strictly sanitary conditions together
with healthful and cheerful surround
ings. The people should Increase
their activity, the doctor continued,
and not alone provide for healthful
conditions on their own premises, but
should demand that the city authori
ties see to It that the unwilling
should obey the law.
He gave a particularh scathing dis
cussion of the fly question, stating
that the peculiar part of it was that
the people didn't seem to realize that
these pests could be exterminated.
There is no question but that this can
be done through a concerted and con
sistent effort of the people.
Before closing his address. Dr, Be
atty said the foundation stones of a
healthful community were proper
sewage good water, and systematic
destruction of garbage These parts
of the civic structure should there
fore be given much attention Thera
should be water Inspectors on duty
constantly., especially on the stream
from which the city secures its water
supply, above the intake, during the
ramping season. These men should
see that nothing contaminating got
Into the stream, and that sheep and
cattle are kept away from it.
In conclusion, he said that a sani
tary survey of the city should be
made so that the people, knowing tho
facts, could act in an intelligent man
ner toward changing them for the bet
ter Mr Kirkham, secretary of the Utah
Development league, spoke brieflv,
outlining in detail the features of thi
"Clean City" contest that has been
inaugurated by hib organization and
the state board of health
Among the suggestions which he
made for successfully carrying on
the coDlest locally, was that a com
mlttee be appointed at the meeting
to create interest among the people
for a better and a cleaner city Much
good could be done, ho said, by ere
ating interest so strong that civic
pride would do the work.
In accordance with this suggestion.
J. D. Larson, who acted as chairman
fit the meeting named the followinr
citizens as a committee to manage
I This Is Excursion Week To I i
Ogden Canyon 1
WE WISH VOL AO? AN ENJOv7 !:rlsf?; l I '
ABLE TIME. AND IF YOU FIND 0gJen Stake Excursion. Today,
YOU NEED A SUIT. HAT. SHIRT, Carpenters' Union, Aug. 1st.
TIE OR SHOES FOR THE OC- fof N XVeer Stake, Aug. 4. 1
CASION, COME AND MAKE YOUR "J. shriners. Aug. 5th.
SELECTION FROM A STOCK ONLY The Veteran Firemen, Aug. 7th. ,
TWO MONTHS OLD AND EVERY- Manufacturers' Ass'n. Aug. 8th.
IB THING CHEAPER Garment Workers, at Lagoon Au H
I Brown-Carlson-Treseder I I
jmrnewmy MM 11
AND THE MAN , I I BJ 9 fty fa
I I IN LOVE
m If the First Man Has a GAS RANGE in Hh Kitchen, He Won't j
Have to Hustle Kindling In and Ashes Cut, at Any Rate.
If the Second Chap Does Not Begin By Burning GAS, He Will Have
to Hustle for Cash to Buy More Expensive Fuel and for
Something to Keep the Fires of Love Alight.
I Utah Light & My. Co. J
I the "Clean City" contest for Ogden
Meedames John Culley, Edward
Bichsel and R B. Porter, and Messrs
George Shorten. I L Reynolds, J. S
Carver and T B. Evans
no
Dr Pldcock has moed from 2301
Washington avenue to 219 Hrst Natl
Bank Bldg ( dvertl?ement)
oo
WAS SITUATION
BROWS WORSE
Russian Ukase Considered Di
rect Challenge to Germany
and Austria-Hungary.
CITIES LAY IN STOCK
Brokerage and Banking Firms
in Difficulties American
7i A J I
Visitors AQviseu iu
Leave.
Berlin, July 31 The morning pass
ed without a break in the hea war
cloud over the European horizon and!
there was no relief to the almost de
spairing uncertalnt existing in the
German capital and excitement con
tinued to increase
It had been generally expected that
today would bring the decision for
peace or war, and when a decree was
promulgated proclaiming martial law
and consequent military government,
all began to think that armed con
flict could be the only outcome
Withholding Moblllzat'on Order.
Government officials however, re
frained from making anv definite dec
laration, saying they preferred to wait
till all the resources of diplomacy had
been exhausted It was well under
stood that the Issue of an order for
the mobilization of the German forces
would be tantamount to a declaration
of war, and It was decided to poet
pone this action until the last possible
moment in which there was a ray ot
hope for peace
It was evident everywhere today
that the military authorities were
quietly preparing for the speedy mov
ing of troops In case the order for
mobilization should be given.
GERMANS ACTIVE
NEAR FRONTIER
Paris. July 31 Military movements
on the German side of the frontier
were very active today and French
troops sent outpost6.
A German patrol at one point acta
ally crossed the frontier probably ow
ing to a mistake.
In no case has any considerable
force of French troops advanced clos
er to the German frontier than six
mile6.
The French office officials were
considerably more pessimistic today
because, as they explained, the grav
ity of the situation was Increasing
with the lapse of each day. At th?
same time it was said that it must
not be assumed that all hope of a
peaceful eolutlon had vanished
France It was said, will not mobilize
her army until after Germany h
done so
GOLD IN PARIS
AT A PREMIUM
Paris. July 31 Gold was at 1 1-8
per cent premium here today English
sovereigns were selling at 28 francs
each, Instead of. the normal rate ot
slightly more thin 25 francs I
A cabinet council Is to be called
' - 1
tomorrow to consider an extension ot i
the terms ot payment for obliga
tlons falling due
The apprehensions of the smaller
trades people here hae gone to such'
nn extent thiit many of them refuse
to take the new government 2o franc j
and 5 franc bills.
Department stores are doing about
only half their U6iial business, owing
to the lack of small change.
uj
THE PREJUDICES OF AUTHORS.
It Is to be hoped that the centen
ary may lead to a revival ot interest
in the novels of Sir Walter Scott, an
author of whom England has special 1
need just now. because now here i j
preached more eloquently the virtue !
of tolerance. Scott wrote of English
bistorv In days when religious and
Civil discord was even harsher than
now, and he managed somehow to do!
justice to both sides He show s both
( avallers and Roundheads as fine fel-1
lows, acting according to their princi
ples, and however he may distribute j
praise and blame, he never makes the
mistake of depicting as knaes the
Englishmen allrned on either side. To
turn to his pages from the acrimbn
lous political controversies which dis
figure the British press in these days
is to breathe a purer and serener air,
and to those Olympian heights the
shrill acriniination.s of Whig and Tory
ascend but as a faint echo of past
controversies
Most authors are as full of preju-
dkes as an eg? is of meat, and even
a writer of genius, as Rudyard Kip
; ling has lately showed, may have
mean and unworthj prejudices
I Scott's as one of those large mag
nanimous natures that can take In
i both sides and put more stress on hu
manit than nn thp ch Ihlinlpf h c nvor
j which humanity works Itself up to a
red fury of slaughter. He was a
I great man, a great author, and a great
! force for good, and England has sel
dom had more need of his large per
specthe. wide sympathy, and kindly
i tolerance It would help amazingly
j if politicians and public would forget
i their party wian;rles long enough to
j celebrate the centenary of "Waverlev,
or 'Tls Sixty Years Since." For real
ly each side means well, if the other
i would not believe it, and that was the
I great and Invaluable lesson vrhich the
1 unequaled master of historical ro
mance managed to extract from his-J
tory Springfield Republican
oo
A jointed hoe which throws pota
toes into a net which Is attached to it
has been patented b- a Maine farmer
MORGAN STILL
HOPES JOR PLACE j
Financier Issues Statement Re
garding Exchange Situation
in United States.
MEN MUST KEEP HEADS
War Will Not Hurt America
Greatly, But Small Losses
Must Be Expected.
New York, July 31. J P. Morgan
today issued a statement which said:
"AlarmiDg as the news is from Eu
1 rope, we are still hoping there will
not be a general war While the
:graty of the present situation can
, hardly be exaggerated, there is still
i the opportunity for the sober second
1 thought of the people of Europe to
prevail over their first Impulses
"The situation of the American se
. curity market during the last few jft
i days has been a splendid illustration , '
j of the inherent soundness of flnan
j clal conditions In this country. WMJe
we all earnestly hoped that the New
j York stock exchange might be kept
I open, the situation is fraught with so
: much uncertainty that it sppthpiI nec
essary in the Interest of the whole
country to close the exchange
"It Is essentially a time for the
owners of merlcan securities to keep
their heads Bear in mind that the
actual properties represented by
American securities will not suffer
greatly by a European war.
"It Is idle to say that America will
not be hurt by a general European
war. The wholesale waste of capi
tal involved In such a catastrophe
would result In a distribution of loss
es the world over, but the Iosb herp
would be infinitesimal compared with
the losses to the countries tmmedlate
h involved. There is no doubt that
the whole American people will co
operate to restore normal conditions
throughout this country at the earli
est possible moment."
;
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America's Foremost Carnival Organization, Presenting
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PEERY LOT, 27TH AND WASHINGTON, j - f

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