OCR Interpretation


The Ogden standard. [volume] (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, August 15, 1914, 4 P.M. City Edition, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058396/1914-08-15/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

Km
THE OGDEN STANDARD, OGDEN, UTAH: SATURDAY, AUGUST 15, 1914. j
'4 " : " i
ESTABLISH ElDlfcTO)
An Independent Newspaper, published
v-y evening except Sunday, without
xuulf or a club.
TERMS OF St'BSCRIPTlON:
tJpiitv in njcn City, per month t jj
Dailv In Ogden City, per year S.BJ
DaJiv outride of Ogden. per yftar
Drily outride of Ogden, 2 months. ... w
Saturday iue only, per year
No anoi.ymo'ja communications pud
Hahed vllllam Glasmann, Pvibllaher.
I' WHEN NAPOLEON WAS
FIGHTING.
When Xajiolpon had Europe Id his
grasp and finally had to face the com
blned fcfyxiies of England, Prussia
Russia, and Austria, there were les!
than one million men engaged Th.v j
-iif rhe worlds great war At the,
present lime the opposing forces ol
Germany on the one side and Franc
on the other, total 29.000.000 men
rAnr.ble of entering the confix The
Napoleonic wars dwindle to in.;ignifi
nnce by comparison.
. An
I CANNERIES AND TIN
SHORTAGE.
Tin is produced in Cornwall, Eng
land, in iho Malay Peninsula and in
some of the islands off the south
coast of Asia Since the beginning
cf the war. no tin has arrived In the
Vnited States and there is said to j
lija !e?s than two weeks supply In
this country.
Perhaps we sliould nol bp worried
mer the. tin supply or give a second
thought to the subject, but we are
deeply concerned because there ts
eome doubt expressed as to thp abil
ity of the can factories of the United
States to furnish tin cans for the can
neries which, throughout Hip I'nited '
States, are now working to capacity '
to keep the canneries stocked
tlf a can shortage occurs between
now and the end of September, our
fruit and tomato canneries may su"
fer severe losses.
Ogden and vicinity Is looking for
ward " to an unprecedentPd tomaio
pack, whioh. without cans, may never
materialize.
With the government doing every
thing possible to restore shipping
there Is a possibility that within thir j
ty days regular passenger and freight
ships will be running between New
York and England when the danger
yt -h tin shortage will disappear, and
' our canning Industry be relieeci of an
uncertainty
oo
PARADCXICAL SITUATION
IN UTAH.
I Senator George Sutherland of Utah
' is so seldom right that it affords the
Standard pleasure In reproducing the
following comment whlh he gave out
ill Salt Lake vfcHtrday:
r"There a paradoxical situation
lnali. We have the Democrats in
Trie riJrVTtM enacting affirmative leg
islation for the first time in the his
ory of the party On tbis leglsla
tlon there can be but two positions
taken One must either be for or
against this leglslallon Colonel
Roosevelt the national leader of the!
Progressives, has denounced In bit
ter terms the policies of the present
national administration. But In Utah
v,a find the Progressive party uniting
with the Democrats in support of the
national administration
"Mr. Moyle must stand with hi6 par
ty. He must declare for free sugar,
for that Is the position his party has
taken Senator New-lands. Senator
Shafroth and Senator Thomas pro
fes6ed to favor protection for sugar,
vet they had to ote with their party
to eliminate this protection Mr.
Moyle must stand with his president
on the canal tolls question. Mr. Moyle
must Indorse the Colombian treaty.
In which the government apologizes
for the acts of Colonel Roosevelt, the
leader of the Progressives The po
sitlon of the fusion parties lu Utah
,-oS--.80 absurd as to be indefensible "
The Standard has expressed the
same thought In somewhat different
language, but the emphasis given by
Senator Sutherland adds to the force
of our observations of the mixed poli
tics In this state.
I- oo .
FROM THE FIELDS OF
PEACE TO WAR.
Chile's nitrate lndustr is receiv
ing widespread attention since the be
ginning of the mighty conflict in Eu
rope. A bulletin from the Pan-American
union in Washington, describing
the nitre deposits of Chile, says
The use of nitrate of soda as a fer
tilizer, though very general now, has
been known to our chllization less
than a century The story goes that
an old Scotchman who lived near the
present nitrate fields about 1816.
spread some soil containing white
crystals over part of his garden.
Things planted In this particular spot
grew wonderfully. Samples of the
Soil were sent to Scotland for analy
sis, and the nature of the substance
and its value as a fertilizer was soon
established. According to tradition,
however centuries before the Spanish
conquest, the lncas of Peru and some
of the natives of Bolivia knew of the
fertilizing value of the white crys
tals, and v e supposed to have known
B Worth $1.25 to $2.50.
I SHIRTS 95c
aM Our Great Removal Sale
Ends Tonight.
jH Get Yours, Men.
1 Buchmiller Flowers
V . Draasfev oT Man."
HH Mfe WAflMl!HC7M AVENUE
ARMIES MASS TS BELGIUM AND IX ALSACE NEAR THE FRONTIER
yr&aL T3wzuk r
T?ie-fMieeJ s I V Si M
r VWY J
FRONTitES j
The opposing armies in the European war are about ready to strike hard in two different place. In
Beltrium at Kamirr. French, English and Belgians in great numbers are ready to battle the huge German army
on Belgian soil. In Alsace, near Muelhauscn in Germany, a great French force is about ready to meet a huge
German army in what may be the first gTeat battle of the war.
-
I how to produce them from the crude
material.
Today ( hile enjos practically a
v orlii monopoly in thn production of
nitrate, and its use is constantly
growing In 1913 the exports reach
ed the high water mark Nearly 3,
Odii.ooo tons were shipped from tho
various ports of the country and went
' tc increase the prodnctlvpnes of the j
soils of many ditferent nations. Inci
dentally, Chile derives a golden harv
est from the product. The revenue
derived from the export duty on ni
trate, If pqually distributed among
the inhabitants of the country, would
give every man. woman, and child no
less than $10 annually. This great
repnue Is being used to build rail
roads. Improve harbors, foster educa
tion, and to build up the nation gen
erally; and. taking into consideration'
the number of Us inhabitants, makes)
Chile one of the richest countries In
thp world.
The Chilean nitrate beds are found
j in a strip of country about 600 miles
long, at a distance varying from 15 to
90 mllps from the Pacific coast. The
deposits lie In great beds or strata
and the product is paslly mined The
overlying strata are penetratpd b
small shafts or drills on through the
natural nitrate beds to the underly
ing bed-rock or substratum of cla or
gravel At the bottom of the shafts
chargps of powder or dynamite are,
placed, which, when exploded break j
up and scatter the surface layers and;
the nitrate. The fragments of nitrate
are then gathered from the debris and
carried in carts or small cars to the I
Oflcinas, or factories, which convert
the natural product Into the white
crystals of nitrate of soda, sack them,
and then transport them to the near
est port for shipment.
Just now. however, the greatest de
mand for nitrate will be to make pow j
der and other explosives Nitric acid:
is needed to manufacture nitrogly
cerine, dynamite, smokeless powder
and the various kinds of high explo
6ives used In these modern timeB
Even in times of peace the United
States uses for manufacturing explo
eiveB three times the amount of ni
trate used In the production of fer
tilizer In times of war no estimate
can be made as to the amount the
world will demand, and doubtless the
price of Chilean nitrate will soar.
uu
WHY JAPAN SHOULD
GO SLOW.
Japan, although an ally of Greai
, Britain, should keep out of the Euro
pean war. The Asiatics should have
no part In determining the future of
the people of Europt, and, further
more Japan should not start a war
in Pacific waterB with any hint at
aggrandizement. The announcement
has been made that the Japanese are
to take the German possessions along
the Asiatic coast and the Samoan
island held by the Kaiser. Such
a course would be inimical to the
best interests of the United States,
and, while this country would not
seek to interfere with whatever Japan
might do agalnat German possessions
in an eriort to help Great Britain,
6till Japan must well know that ag
gressions of that nature would prova
offensive to the United Statea and, In
the future, might cause friction.
Unless Great Britain is in desper
ate straits, the Japanese would do
I well to maintain neutrality.
no
BUSINESS AND THE
GREAT WAR.
War's effect are reflected In the
trade reviews for the week, Brad
street's of today says.
War's unaettlement runs broad and
deep throughout nearly an una of
American trade and Industry and com
modity prices fluctuate sharply,
though genprally tending higher. Still
many features are evident which
seem bound to bring about an ulti
mate restoration of now greatly di.s
organized forces.
The federal reserve board has be
gun working the possible strike of
western railway men has been avert
ed and submitted to mediation, the
railway freight ra'p situation has
been to a certain extent settled. ban!
Ing and currency conditions are set
tling down to an approximation oi
normal, considering existing condi
tions popular unfMsinPss as to finan
cial matters has been largely con
spicuous by its absence, and the ar
rival of much-needed rains has helped
cotton, late corn and other late plant
ed crops. Efforts to restore the for
eign exchange market to something
like nominal are found in the at
tempts toward an approach to a sys
tem of payment for goods exported to
other countries.
Bradstreet's reports bank clearings
for the week ended August 13 at 2,
216.989 000 a decrease of 19.4 per
cent from 1012, failures at 1'7V
against 272 In 1912, wheat exports
at H. 726, 319 bushels, against 7,517,654
bushels.
Dun s Review offers the follow ing
encouragement
Further progress has been made In
meeting the serious problems of mon
ev , exchange insurance and trade
arising out of the European war. The
government is co-operating with bank
ers and merchants in dealing with the
unprecedented situation and an im
portant conference was held In Sec
retary McAdoo's office In Washing
ton, to which many leading business
men were invited While the ex
changes remain closed and the for
eign trade embargo continues, con
dltions are daily Improving and cour
age is displayed in meeting each new-
emergency. An opening has been
made in foreign exchange bv which it
is possible to move some wheat for
export "
uu
AT THIS STAGE OF
THE WAR.
There are two lines of action open
to the French and their allies in the
struggle now on. One Is to meet
the Germans as far north in Belgium
as they can gather their army in
strength and there resist the south
ward march of the Invaders, without
risking everything on one battle, be
ing prepared to fall back in order
constantly fighting and harassing tho
Kaisers men until the permanent
French defenses are reached along
the French frontier and there try con
clusions. The advantage In those tac
tics would be in forcing the Germans
to fight on ground selected by the
French and under conditions most fa
vorable to the attacked, constantly
forcing the Germans to move against
entrenched lines and always drawing
them further from their base of sup
plies
The other plan that Is open to the
French is to make, counter moves in
v ---- 6a,,.ot ine uermans
While the Kaiser's men are attempt
ing to sweep through northern and
eastern Belgium, the French might
try to drive a wedge up through Al
8ace-Lorralne, In order to keep the
German army from massing at any
point and driving home a mighty, ir
resistible blow.
An offensive movement often
serves to keep an army on Its mettle.
It begins to look now as though the
Germans have established a base well
down In Luxemburg, close to tho
French frontier, and. with one wing
extending northwest, are beginning
to move that arm as a spoke to their
great war wheel, clearing the terri
tory of all opposition. When the outer
edge of this wing gets down to the
French frontier, the decisive battle
of the war may be fought Should th?
Germans at any time prior to reach
ing the French fortifications be seri
ously checked, their prospects of suc
cess would be greatly reduced Only
bv a swift move on the French and :
quirk triumph, can the Kaiser's for
ces expect to win. for if they are de
layed until Russia begins to thunder
at the gates to the roads that lead
to Berlin they will be serloush men
at ed and, divided in strength be less
formidable than they are today.
oo
Last time tonight to see the
European war pictures in
Hearsts' Weekly, ai the Isis.
Advertisement.
uu
THE WORLD'S
MARKET NEWS
Liverpool Cotton.
Liverpool, Aug. 15. A few sales of
niericnn spot cotton were made to
day, but the total was not announced
The price was on basis of 6 50d for
middling There were no imports
Liverpool Grain.
Liverpool, Aug. 15. Wheat Spot
w eak ; Nos 1 and 2 Manitoba, Ss, 6d ;
futures weak; October, 7a. 6d.
Corn Spot American mixed, new,
nominallv, ss. futures, dull; Septem
ber, 6s, 6 l-2d, October. 66, 2 3-4d.
Chicago Livestock.
Chicago, Aug. 15 -Hogs Receipts.
700o ; market 5 (Tilde lower Bulk of
sales. $9,06 9.30; light, f?.00?B.40j
mixed. $8 T 5 9 . 4 : heavy, $8.65
9.35; rough, $8.558 70, pigs. $7.00 C
8.70.
Cattle Receipts 200: market
steady Beeves, $7.25 10.15; steers,
$6.40 9.30; cows and heifers, $3.75 Q
5'. Ho; stockers and feeders, $5.50'(?
8 10, calves. S8 5011.76.
Sheep Receipts, 2000, market
steady. Sheep. $5.:40T7 6 15 ; yearling,
$6.000.7.10; lambs, $6 608 66.
Kansas City Livestock.
Kansas City, Aug 15 Hogs Re
ceipts 500; market 10 to 15c lower.
Cattle Receipts, 200; market
steady.
Sheep Receipts, none; market
steady.
South Omaha Livestock.
South Omaha, Aug. 15 Hogs Re
ceipts, 7800; market lower. Bulk of
sales, $8.90i?J9 00, heavy, $8.85(3-9. 00;
light, $8.90 9.10; pigs $8,060 8.55-
Cattle Receipts, 100; market
steady Native steers, $7.75 10.75 ,
cows and heifers, $6. 008. 00. west
ern steers, $6 508.75; Texas steer.
$6.00(7 80, cows and heifers, $5.75
(&7 15, calves. $7.50(510.50.
Sheep Receipts. 100; market
steady. Yearlings, $6.00 6.50; weth
ere, $5.65(;6.15; lambs, $7 757.85.
Chicago Hog Market.
Chicago, Aug. 15 Receipts, 8000.
market weak, 15 to 20c lower. Bulk
or sales. $9.00fi9.25; light, 58 90(r;
9 35; mixed, $8.70(39 35; heavy, $8.45
5 9 26; rough. $8 45(5 8 65; pigs, $7 00
(38.70.
Bar Silver.
London, Aug. 15 Bar silver, steady
at 27d per ounce
Wheat.
Minneapolis, Aug 15 Wheat Sep
tember, 96 3-4c; No. 1 hard, $1.09 3-4,
No 1 northern. $1.00 3-4(31.07 3-4;
No. 2 northern, 97 3-4 1.04 3-4c
Money.
New York, Aug. 15. Mercantile pa
per. 67 per cent, sterling exchange,
nominal, for cables, $4 95; for de
mand, $4 90.
CHICAGO GRAIN
Chicago, Aug. 15. Increasing belief
that the resumption of export trade
would be a slow process had a de
pressing Influence today on the wheat
market. Tho Washington conference
from which many bulls had looked for
Immediate help regarding shipments
.Irir.-ini.iiniiju 1 1 m i in U ,
J to Europe served to render more, clear
j the fact that much time at best would
be required to surmount difficulties
Liverpool dispntrhes indicating tint
no extreme scarcity was imminent In
Great Britain counted also on the side
of lower prices. After opening 3-4 to
l 7-8c down, values bore underwent
some additional declines.
Corn sagr.fi with wheat Knd of
the week selling by small longs form
ed the principal feature. The market
openerl 3-8 1-2 to 1 l-2c 0fr. and
showed but little power to rally
Talk of export sales appeared 10
have lost effect in the oats crowd
The cereal had no Independent action
and was governed chiefly by corn.
Normal receipts of hogs caused pro
visions to eas hack First iransar
tions were 2 1-.' to 5c lower and
tlurr was a subsequent further dm,)
Lack of support resulted later In
B f;ill In wheat reaching to P, cents un
der last night. A little rally ensued,
however on news that the Argentine
government had been authorized to
prohibit exports The close was
Steady 2 1-8 to 2 3-8c net lower.
Fairly heavy rural corn offerings
tended to carry prices yet lower, but
not In a lasting maimer The close
was steady at 1-4 to lc net decline.
oo
See Hazel Dawn, at Ogden
Theater tonight. Advertisement.
OGDEN STAKE SUNDAY
SCHOOLS IT OUTING
The annual outing of th1 Opln
Stake Sunday schools was held yes
terday at Lagoon and was participat
ed in by over 500 persons from Og
den and the northern towns of We
her county. The bar at the resort
was closed during the day and eve
ning by a special arrangement be
tween the Bamberger company and
the Sunday school board and this fact
was appreciated by all of the church
people.
An excellent program of sports was
carried out in the afternoon anil i 1
large portion of the crowd remained
for thp dancing In the evening. The
only disagreeable feature In connec
tlon with the event was the inade
quate transportation facilities fur
nished by the Salt Lake A Ogden
Railroad company, both to and from
the resort, many of the excursionists
having to stand up In the cars and
vestibules, or on the steps, In order
to get to and from the resort at a
reasonable hour This condition is
said to be the rulp on excursion
days and has been the cause of con
siderable protest.
CARD OF THANKS
W wish to extend our sincere
thanks to all who so klndlv assisted
during the sickness and death of our
son and brother W. O. Biddle, and
for the beautiful floral offerings from
the friends at Carlln Nevada, and
here in Ogden. Also to the speakers,
singers and accompanist at the serv
ice, and to the engineers and firemen
who acted as pall bearers.
MR and MRS W A. BIDDLE
AND FAMILY
MR and MRS W S. WILLIAMS,
Sister and Brother.
MR and MRS L. S. WILLIAMS.
Sister and Brother.
Advertisement.
rkrt
SICK MISSIONARY
RETURNS HOME:
V-1 d r Earl W. Folkman. son ot
George D Folkman, returned home
yesterday from the Georgia confer
ence of the Mormon Southern States
Mission His arrival was a surprise!
to the family as they had not been j
notified of his coming.
Elder Folkman was taken ill with'
malaria, the dreaded southern dis
ease, several months ago and was
thought to be near death about three
weeks ago. He improved in health i
again, however, and the family!
thought that he would bo completely!
cured Georgia weather conditions
were against this, in the belief of the j
mission officers, and they decided1
that he had better come home to the
, I
WANTED
HOUSE TO RENT
Need 4 bedrooms. Must be
modern, on bench, and have
heating plant.
W. C. WRIGHT,
Wright's Store.
LAST CHANCE
Our Wonderful Removal
Sale Ends Tonight.
Men, Get Yours.
Buchmiller & Flowers
"Dressers of Men"
2461 Washington Ave.
'The Pride of Ogden,"
I One of Otir Girls 1
7:00, 8:15 or 9:30 Tonight. '
OGDEN THAT,R
higher altitude and drier climate to j
convalesce.
VIJ
THEATERS
HAZEL DAWN AT THE OGDEN.
The 'Standing Room Only ' sign
was out at the Ogden last night, tho
occasion being our Ogden girl, Hazel
Dawn in tho Famous Players produc
tion, One of Our Girls " Hazel Dawn
lc seen at her best in this play and
captivated hr hosts of Ogden friends
and admirers by her delightful man
ner and her many beautiful costumes.
r lygffWMBMWBSBBMIIIIIII fill '
Cement That Stands I
the Test
Red
Devil
The Rock Cement
Sold by every dealer
in Ogden
Union Portland
Cement Company
Gen. Office: Ogden, Ut.
After seeing her on the screen we
( an readily see why she haa mado
such a trmendom success In New
York. The play will be shown again
tonight for the last time f
Removal Sale Ends
! TONIGHT
GET YOURS, MEN.
Buchmiller & Flowers,
"Dressers of Men." j
2461 Washington Ave. I
I The Housewife's I
Friend
Riverdaie I
High- I
Patent I
Flour
Sold by all leading dealers
OGDEN MILLING 1
& ELEVATOR CO. 1
Ogden. Utah.
I BUY THE CEMENT I
THAT IS BEST BY 1
TEST
PORTLAND CENENTCO)
liiSP I
Trade Mark
I Made by the
Ogden Portland
Cement Co.
Ogden, Utah.
Read the Classified Ad.
oo
Read the Classified Ads.
Round Trip (
SUMMER & I
EXCURSIONS (IP j
-VIA-- I
UNION PACIFIC 1
FROM OGDEN V
New York, via Standard Lines $86.00
New York, via Differential lines. .$83.00
Boston, via Standard Lines $86.00
Boston, via Differential Lines $82.50
ChicaS $56.50 Memphis $59.85
Colorado Springs. $22.50 St. Paul $53.50
Denver $22.50 Dmaha $40.00
Kansas City $40.00 St. Louis $51.20
Proportionate Rate to Other Points.
Date of Sale:
August 19, 26,
September 2, 16.
Long Limits Liberal Stopovers Diverse Routes.
CITY TICKET OFFICE
2514 Washington Ave.
WrlrAVlF:S' PHONE PAUL L. EEEMER, A
Genera Agent. otnn .
2500 City Pass. A Tkt. Agent WW
BOOKING OFFICE IMPORTANT STEAMSHIP LINE8.

xml | txt